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New build for someone that sort of knows what they're doing...

Background info (If you don't care and just want to get to my question, skip to the Too Long Didn't Read [TLDR] part):

I built my rig back in 2011. I went with an ASUS P7p55d motherboard with an i5-760 and a GTX 460. I have 8gb of Ripjaw memory and a corsair 750 modular PSU. Right down the middle of mid-range gaming PC as you can get for the time. I've since upgraded my card to a GTX 760.

I can still play most games, but my equipment is starting to show its age as most games I really have to be selective with what I turn to high, and some things I just have to turn off all together to keep games looking good but still functional. I started thinking I could just upgrade to the "top of the line for the time". i7 CPU, 16GB RAM, 1080 GPU... The problem is, the 1156 socket i7 CPU is still over $250. No one has really been able to upgrade this board to 16GB of RAM, even though the board says it can support it. And I'm wondering if the bus speeds of the board would even be worth putting a modern GPU in it.

My previous computer I researched and compared everything. I had 7 months of deployment time to spend literally months putting combos together through newegg and compared those with amazon and tiger direct. I read comments and ratings for every brand and chipset. You get the idea. I just don't really have the motivation or time to go through every 3d mark stress test and forum to figure out what the latest and greatest tech is today.

TL;DR

I'm hoping you guys can give me a quick run down of what I really need vs what would be overkill. So z270 or z370 board.. Whats the real difference? The socket is the same (though I realize its not compatible) Is it worth it to go z370 or is it just kind of a gimmick? Is that going to eventually be the industry standard?

I want an i7, a GTX 1080, and 16GB of RAM (if not 32). I will not ever be upgrading to SLI. I think its just as cost effective to upgrade to the next generation of card than to hold out and buy another outdated card and then have to deal with the issues that come with SLI. I do not plan on overclocking. I don't care about lights and looking cool. I DO want dual monitors, however my second monitor is not so much for super widescreen, but I keep my chat programs expanded on it so i know who I'm talking to though teamspeak, discord, whatever. I don't need a million PCI-E slots or 900 USB ports. 1080 GPU, maybe a slot for a wireless card, m2 SSD should be all I need and let that ride for the next 5+ years. So, what MB would you recommend for such a setup?
Reply to kgmoynahan
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  1. 1. Z370 is not backward compatible -> it will support coffee lake and forward. Z270 is done, kaby lake is the last gen.
    2. I5-8400 build suits you best, what is your total budget?
    Reply to vapour
  2. Depends on what the PC will be used for (main use) monitor resolution and refresh rate., your budget , and where you live you posted a long as post and never stated any of that.
    In general your not going to get a video card to last 5 years it's better to buy what you need and upgrade the card in a couple years.
    Reply to Zerk2012
  3. If you don't need many cores get Z270. KabyLake has less cores but higher clock speed. If you need more cores get Z370. CoffeeLake has more cores but lower base frequency but also higher turbo frequency, though KabyLake still preforms better in more lightly threaded applications. All you really need to look for in a motherboard is compatibility, features, ports, and most importantly, RGB ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)
    Reply to KittyFish62
  4. Zerk2012 said:
    Depends on what the PC will be used for, your budget , and where you live you posted a long as post and never stated any of that.


    To me, he/she is a gamer, but wants best bang for the money and a rig can last 5+ years.
    Reply to vapour
  5. vapour said:
    Zerk2012 said:
    Depends on what the PC will be used for, your budget , and where you live you posted a long as post and never stated any of that.


    To me, he/she is a gamer, but wants best bang for the money and a rig can last 5+ years.


    A video card lasting 5 years is not realistic no mater what you buy.
    You buy what you need now for the monitor resolution and refresh rate and upgrade in a couple of years.
    I mean 5 years ago you would be using like a GTX 560ti or 4XX
    I also always recommend a K CPU when possible it can get a couple more years life out of the PC when it no longer gives the performance you OC the crap out of it instead of buying all new parts. (a extra 50/60 bucks now or rebuild a couple years quicker.
    Reply to Zerk2012
  6. Ohhh... $1500 +/- is my budget for the main parts. Already have the case, PSU and peripherals.

    I live in Detroit, MI USA.

    I know a video card wont last that long, but I want a MB that will. As I said, I'll upgrade the GPU if I have to, I just don't really care to go SLI to keep up. The MB seems to be my bottleneck at the moment. We'll assume I want to plug in at least one 4k monitor to it eventually.

    More and more games seem to be utilizing the CPU (like Arma for example), and with streaming kodi vids and other things, I think an i7 would still be a better option overall than an i5.

    And Zerk, you're absolutely right, I was indeed running a 460 when I built this thing. My buddy built his about 3 months later and went with the 560ti so your timeframe is spot on.
    Reply to kgmoynahan
  7. What case and PSU do you have? What monitor are you using right now?
    We'll assume I want to plug in at least one 4k monitor to it eventually.
    Their not really a single card out for that still unless you play low demanding games or cut the settings down.
    Buy a card for the monitor your using now and upgrade the card when you get a 4K monitor they will be better stuff out then.
    And yes SLI is a crutch and as of now the drivers for it will not be officially worked on with any of the newer cards.
    Reply to Zerk2012
  8. KittyFish62 said:
    If you don't need many cores get Z270. KabyLake has less cores but higher clock speed. If you need more cores get Z370. CoffeeLake has more cores but lower base frequency but also higher turbo frequency, though KabyLake still preforms better in more lightly threaded applications. All you really need to look for in a motherboard is compatibility, features, ports, and most importantly, RGB ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)


    That's kind of the point of my question, because really, I understand the difference between a $200 board and $300 is often times 3x as many ports for triple video cards and whatnot, which is completely unnecessary for me. I was just curious at what point does the performance actually level out and you're just paying for extra slots?
    Reply to kgmoynahan
  9. Zerk2012 said:
    What case and PSU do you have? What monitor are you using right now?
    We'll assume I want to plug in at least one 4k monitor to it eventually.
    Their not really a single card out for that still unless you play low demanding games or cut the settings down.
    Buy a card for the monitor your using now and upgrade the card when you get a 4K monitor they will be better stuff out then.


    Oh, and I have a Corsair 750W gold rated modular PSU

    Antac 300 case. I know its kind of on the small side, but still fits a standard ATX board. I'm willing to get a better case if I have to. I have an Acer G235H monitor. It's just as old as the rest of my computer. I don't really need 4k honestly. I was just thinking it would be nice to have the option later on.
    Reply to kgmoynahan
  10. kgmoynahan said:
    KittyFish62 said:
    If you don't need many cores get Z270. KabyLake has less cores but higher clock speed. If you need more cores get Z370. CoffeeLake has more cores but lower base frequency but also higher turbo frequency, though KabyLake still preforms better in more lightly threaded applications. All you really need to look for in a motherboard is compatibility, features, ports, and most importantly, RGB ( ͡° ͜ʖ ͡°)


    That's kind of the point of my question, because really, I understand the difference between a $200 board and $300 is often times 3x as many ports for triple video cards and whatnot, which is completely unnecessary for me. I was just curious at what point does the performance actually level out and you're just paying for extra slots?


    If your Power supply is from 2011 it's time to retire it back to the same question what monitor do you have now.
    Reply to Zerk2012
  11. kgmoynahan said:
    Zerk2012 said:
    What case and PSU do you have? What monitor are you using right now?
    We'll assume I want to plug in at least one 4k monitor to it eventually.
    Their not really a single card out for that still unless you play low demanding games or cut the settings down.
    Buy a card for the monitor your using now and upgrade the card when you get a 4K monitor they will be better stuff out then.


    Oh, and I have a Corsair 750W gold rated modular PSU

    Antac 300 case. I know its kind of on the small side, but still fits a standard ATX board. I'm willing to get a better case if I have to. I have an Acer G235H. It's just as old as the rest of my computer. I don't really need 4k honestly. I was just thinking it would be nice to have the option later on.

    Is that the RM or AX series PSU.
    EDIT HX their several different some are better than others.
    Reply to Zerk2012
  12. HX
    Reply to kgmoynahan
  13. http://www.corsair.com/en-us/professional-series-hx750-80-plus-silver-certified-modular-power-supply

    That's literally the PSU i have right now. Silver rated, excuse me :-p
    Reply to kgmoynahan
  14. My suggestion:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8400 2.8GHz 6-Core Processor ($199.89 @ B&H)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z370 PC PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($129.49 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: Crucial - Ballistix Sport LT 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2666 Memory ($139.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: SanDisk - SSD PLUS 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($74.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($43.78 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8GB Mini Video Card ($449.99 @ B&H)
    Case: Fractal Design - Focus G (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair - TXM Gold 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($72.98 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($92.99 @ Best Buy)
    Monitor: Asus - VG248QE 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor ($246.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $1496.07
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-09 22:19 EST-0500

    The monitor is to utilize new gig
    psu is reserved if needed to replace your old PSU
    1070ti can be oced to stock 1080
    Reply to vapour
  15. vapour said:
    My suggestion:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8400 2.8GHz 6-Core Processor ($199.89 @ B&H)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z370 PC PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($129.49 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: Crucial - Ballistix Sport LT 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2666 Memory ($139.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: SanDisk - SSD PLUS 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($74.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($43.78 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8GB Mini Video Card ($449.99 @ B&H)
    Case: Fractal Design - Focus G (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair - TXM Gold 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($72.98 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($92.99 @ Best Buy)
    Monitor: Asus - VG248QE 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor ($246.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $1496.07
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-09 22:19 EST-0500

    The monitor is to utilize new gig
    psu is reserved if needed to replace your old PSU
    1070ti can be oced to stock 1080


    Oh yea, I guess I should've noted that I have that WD 1TB HD as well as a Crucial BX100 2.5 500GB solid state. I was wanting the m2 drive to replace the disk and platter 1TB HD as a boot drive, so it doesn't really need to be super big but also not needed at this point.

    I suppose the 1070ti would suit me just as well for now.

    PSU will probably give me a few more years.

    So that brings us to $1300 and some change. Black Friday will probably knock off another $100-$200 from that, so if you had an extra say $300 to burn from this setup, what would you put it in?
    Reply to kgmoynahan
  16. Best answer
    I will edit like this:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8600K 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($279.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: Noctua - NH-D15 82.5 CFM CPU Cooler ($88.88 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock - Z370 Extreme4 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($159.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: Crucial - Ballistix Sport LT 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2666 Memory ($139.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8GB Mini Video Card ($449.99 @ B&H)
    Case: Fractal Design - Focus G (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.98 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($92.99 @ Best Buy)
    Monitor: Asus - VG248QE 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor ($246.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $1503.70
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-09 22:40 EST-0500
    Reply to vapour
  17. I think i've got a really good starting point. I appreciate you guys a ton!
    Reply to kgmoynahan
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