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Asus Maximus Hero X - Rear I/O Panel Fitting

I've been trying to fit my new Hero X board into my NZXT H440 case and am finding it difficult, having never dealt with a pre-applied IO shield..

As the rear I/O panel is pre-applied to the board, I'm unsure as to how this rear panel should interface with the case. Should it just be pressed up against the inside of it (see pictures below) or should the highlighted metal prongs be pushed in/through the rear of the case?

https://i.imgur.com/WseUep2.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/cOofUDd.jpg
https://i.imgur.com/5QXb1qX.jpg

I've managed to get the board fitted with it pressed up against the inside of the case by taking one of the middle stand offs out as this was stopping it from aligning. It looks to be aligned and screwed in properly now but that rear IO panel just seems odd to me..

Can anyone shed some light on how this fits?

Many thanks!
3 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about asus maximus hero rear panel fitting
  1. Although the fit is not perfect i don't think will cause any problems to leave it that way. If the fit still bothers you try loosening the screws holding the plastic IO cover to the motherboard and adjust it as much as you can.
  2. First, sorry for my english, i am from holland ;-)

    I have the exact same "problem" with my hero X board, but in a Fractal Design define S case. I doesnt really align nice without allot of force. I even damaged the sticker on the i/o shield :(
    But its in now, and when i look at it, it looks exacly the same as your photo's.
    I really dont know why they did it that way, and didnt make the shield exacly the normal size (it seems its a bit to big now).

    ratedslice said:
    I've been trying to fit my new Hero X board into my NZXT H440 case and am finding it difficult, having never dealt with a pre-applied IO shield..

    As the rear I/O panel is pre-applied to the board, I'm unsure as to how this rear panel should interface with the case. Should it just be pressed up against the inside of it (see pictures below) or should the highlighted metal prongs be pushed in/through the rear of the case?

    https://i.imgur.com/WseUep2.jpg
    https://i.imgur.com/cOofUDd.jpg
    https://i.imgur.com/5QXb1qX.jpg

    I've managed to get the board fitted with it pressed up against the inside of the case by taking one of the middle stand offs out as this was stopping it from aligning. It looks to be aligned and screwed in properly now but that rear IO panel just seems odd to me..

    Can anyone shed some light on how this fits?

    Many thanks!
  3. Best answer
    ratedslice said:
    I've been trying to fit my new Hero X board into my NZXT H440 case and am finding it difficult, having never dealt with a pre-applied IO shield..

    As the rear I/O panel is pre-applied to the board, I'm unsure as to how this rear panel should interface with the case. Should it just be pressed up against the inside of it (see pictures below) or should the highlighted metal prongs be pushed in/through the rear of the case?

    https://i.imgur.com/WseUep2.jpg
    https://i.imgur.com/cOofUDd.jpg
    https://i.imgur.com/5QXb1qX.jpg

    I've managed to get the board fitted with it pressed up against the inside of the case by taking one of the middle stand offs out as this was stopping it from aligning. It looks to be aligned and screwed in properly now but that rear IO panel just seems odd to me..

    Can anyone shed some light on how this fits?

    Many thanks!


    I've been lurking around Google for this to be answered as well, as I too have a Hero X, and I too have my mobo's I/O shield applied just like yours. It doesn't bother anything the way it is and im assuming since the way the outside prongs are built that it doesn't need to be outside of the case like we think, or snapped in somewhere. Like I said, if it's not causing you any problems now or hasnt cause you any problems since this post then you should be fine. I was just curious myself as to why i'm here lol. Hope I shed some light on it,
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