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Changing RAID setup on storage drives (non-boot)

I have a machine with a SSD as boot drive, and two identical 750gb HDDs connected in a RAID 0 configuration, used for storage. I'd like to change their configuration to RAID 1. I don't seem to be able to find any information about this - all questions from others seem to be refer to boot drives rather than storage drives. Any help would be much appreciated.
Reply to clarkaidan
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More about changing raid setup storage drives boot
  1. Process would be the same. Delete the RAID 0 and create a new RAID1. All data on the drives will be lost.
    Reply to kanewolf
  2. Thanks, the problem is that I can't find any option to do this in the BIOS. I can switch from AHCI to RAID but then it won't boot.
    Reply to clarkaidan
  3. So your RAID 0, was created as a striped volume from the OS rather than a RAID volume from the controller in the motherboard?
    Reply to kanewolf
  4. kanewolf said:
    So your RAID 0, was created as a striped volume from the OS rather than a RAID volume from the controller in the motherboard?


    It's probable. I didn't actually build the machine myself, it's second-hand. But I do know that one of the hard drives wasn't originally in the system, and was added later to create the RAID 0.
    Reply to clarkaidan
  5. I don't generally recommend RAID for home use in any situation. You will be more secure if you create two volumes and use one for backups. RAID 1 only protects against drive failure. That is not the most likely reason for data loss. Read thiese articles --
    https://www.smallnetbuilder.com/nas/nas-features/31745-data-recovery-tales-raid-is-not-backup
    https://www.smallnetbuilder.com/nas/nas-features/32168-data-recovery-tales-prepare-the-right-way-for-raid-failure

    I would create two independent volumes and use good backup software.
    Reply to kanewolf
  6. kanewolf said:
    I don't generally recommend RAID for home use in any situation. You will be more secure if you create two volumes and use one for backups. RAID 1 only protects against drive failure. That is not the most likely reason for data loss. Read thiese articles --
    https://www.smallnetbuilder.com/nas/nas-features/31745-data-recovery-tales-raid-is-not-backup
    https://www.smallnetbuilder.com/nas/nas-features/32168-data-recovery-tales-prepare-the-right-way-for-raid-failure

    I would create two independent volumes and use good backup software.


    Thanks. So say I was to convert the RAID to two separate volumes, how would I go about it?
    Reply to clarkaidan
  7. Best answer
    You are going to need to look at disk manager to see if it was created as a Windows Striped volume. I think you can just wipe all the partitions off each disk. But, I have never done it. I am just guessing on this. Anything you do your data is gone, so you can't really hurt anything...
    Reply to kanewolf
  8. kanewolf said:
    You are going to need to look at disk manager to see if it was created as a Windows Striped volume. I think you can just wipe all the partitions off each disk. But, I have never done it. I am just guessing on this. Anything you do your data is gone, so you can't really hurt anything...


    Thanks. How can I tell if it is a striped volume? Under "type" it says "basic".
    Reply to clarkaidan
  9. This seems contradictory to my understanding. If it isn't a HW RAID from the motherboard, then it would have to be a software RAID at the OS. BUT to be a software RAID at the OS it would have to be a dynamic volume -- https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa363785(v=vs.85).aspx

    Which way is the BIOS set? RAID or AHCI ? Maybe I misinterpreted your earlier about switching ...
    Reply to kanewolf
  10. kanewolf said:
    This seems contradictory to my understanding. If it isn't a HW RAID from the motherboard, then it would have to be a software RAID at the OS. BUT to be a software RAID at the OS it would have to be a dynamic volume -- https://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/windows/desktop/aa363785(v=vs.85).aspx

    Which way is the BIOS set? RAID or AHCI ? Maybe I misinterpreted your earlier about switching ...


    Yes, this is what's confusing me. The BIOS is set as AHCI, which is why I can't do anything to change the RAID configuration there. But the drive is definitely showing as Basic rather than Dynamic.
    Reply to clarkaidan
  11. So, it appears now that the HDDs weren't set up as RAID 0, as I was told, but are actually being used in a Storage Pool. Some sort of virtual array. Absolutely bizarre. I'm removing one and then I'll reinstall it separately. Seems to be working out now. Thanks very much for your help.
    Reply to clarkaidan
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