Power supply buzzing and whining

I just bought an Apevia Warlock 750W after the last one (from 2008, no less) lost over 50% of its power. Couldn't even run Skyrim past the loading screen before overpower protection kicked in.

So I bought a newer one, seems to be a newer revision because instead of four standard 8-pins and two six-pins it's only got two six-pins and two 8-pins for PCI devices.

It's a little noisy but I don't mind because it's gonna be in my case and my games/music will overloud it anyway.

It runs my PC at idle fine, but when I boot up Fallout 4, it starts buzzing. I have a short video of it: https://youtu.be/z10S3LSO8JY

Any insight? Stick with my Corsair CX600?
Reply to EquineHero
10 answers Last reply
More about power supply buzzing whining
  1. Never by an Apevia power supply, they are terrible quality
    Reply to Snipergod87
  2. Is this it:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817148035

    That is one bad quality poorly designed and built PSU.

    Input selector switch 115/230 volts? What is this, 2006?

    Combined 48 amps on 12V. That's 576W. This unit with today's standards would be sold as a 600-650W at best.

    Run fast, run far!
    Reply to Satan-IR
  3. Satan-IR said:
    Is this it:

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817148035

    That is one bad quality poorly designed and built PSU.

    Input selector switch 115/230 volts? What is this, 2006?

    Combined 48 amps on 12V. That's 576W. This unit with today's standards would be sold as a 600-650W at best.

    Run fast, run far!


    My Corsair CX600 has a 115/225 input selector.

    576W is fine for a single 1070 and 80W Xeon.

    I'll stick with the Corsair and keep this for testing motherboards and other components.
    Reply to EquineHero
  4. Yes others might have have too but that is old design and modern good units usually don't have that.

    That 576W is plenty yes, provided it can really provide a constant clean 576W under load and esp if temps raise a bit inside the case.

    That's a good choice, needless to say, everything's life inside the case depends on the PSU.

    Yes, it might work fine for a few years even and do the job or it might give up after a short while and take a few other components with it.
    Reply to Satan-IR
  5. Satan-IR said:
    Yes others might have have too but that is old design and modern good units usually don't have that.

    That 576W is plenty yes, provided it can really provide a constant clean 576W under load and esp if temps raise a bit inside the case.

    That's a good choice, needless to say, everything's life inside the case depends on the PSU.

    Yes, it might work fine for a few years even and do the job or it might give up after a short while and take a few other components with it.


    I'm using my Corsair power supply right now, but if the Apevia proves to be reliable on my test bench I may switch over. The buzzing makes me really, really nervous and I've overclocked my Xeon so I don't want to push a bad PSU and risk frying things until I know that the power supply can hold itself up.

    Normally I have three screens but I upgraded my motherboard and water cooled my 1070.

    Here it is inside my case with my new setup (yes, I did zip tie a 120mm AiO onto my GTX 1070, I'm an idiot like that):









    Reply to EquineHero
  6. EquineHero said:
    Satan-IR said:
    Yes others might have have too but that is old design and modern good units usually don't have that.

    That 576W is plenty yes, provided it can really provide a constant clean 576W under load and esp if temps raise a bit inside the case.

    That's a good choice, needless to say, everything's life inside the case depends on the PSU.

    Yes, it might work fine for a few years even and do the job or it might give up after a short while and take a few other components with it.


    I'm using my Corsair power supply right now, but if the Apevia proves to be reliable on my test bench I may switch over. The buzzing makes me really, really nervous and I've overclocked my Xeon so I don't want to push a bad PSU and risk frying things until I know that the power supply can hold itself up.

    Normally I have three screens but I upgraded my motherboard and water cooled my 1070.

    Here it is inside my case with my new setup (yes, I did zip tie a 120mm AiO onto my GTX 1070, I'm an idiot like that):












    How are you going to determine whether it's reliable? Even if it can hold itself up it doesn't mean it would give up sooner than a well-designed and well-built PSU.

    My experience says if a PSU makes noises and huffs and puffs while working and under load get rid of it. On a slightly different note, why use something that makes you nervous? It'd make me nervous too hearing it making noises all the time.

    That cooling is interesting, how are temps on GPU and VRAM and VRMS and stuff? Done any measurements apart from card sensors? What's the card?
    Reply to Satan-IR
  7. Satan-IR said:


    How are you going to determine whether it's reliable? Even if it can hold itself up it doesn't mean it would give up sooner than a well-designed and well-built PSU.

    My experience says if a PSU makes noises and huffs and puffs while working and under load get rid of it. On a slightly different note, why use something that makes you nervous? It'd make me nervous too hearing it making noises all the time.

    That cooling is interesting, how are temps on GPU and VRAM and VRMS and stuff? Done any measurements apart from card sensors? What's the card?


    It's an nVidia GTX 1070 Founder's Edition, with Samsung memory. I love the thing, it's great.

    With a CPU cooler like that it gets around 55C when overclocked to the balls (2125MHz) on Unigine Superposition. I am going to get a larger rad at some point, but this one is brand new as of today so I'll wait a few months to see how the pump holds up.

    On air, it got to 60C with the fans in full force hurricane mode when running Unigine, and it failed to boost to even 2100MHz.

    As far as VRAM goes... Let's just say I'm not gonna OC the RAM any further until I get full copper minisinks for each chip. It's at +400MHz right now, each chip is stable at around 45-50C under load.

    As for the VRMs...they need a fan. I'm gonna order a Noctual 80mm PWM fan and slap it right on the card's PWM header with a custom acrylic mount so I don't have to deal with the lack of an actual fan mount. I've got an 80mm non-PWM there now going off of a 5v USB header.

    They get hot enough to nearly burn you when it's overclocked, and it doesn't help that I did the power shunt bypass mod. This thing uses about 275W on its own.

    My Xeon gives off far more heat than my 1070 does though, probably because of the IHS and larger die.

    With my 240mm radiator when overclocked to a boost frequency of 3.9GHz (stock 3.7) (BCLK @105.8MHz), I have yet to observe load temps because I haven't done anything but Reddit, Imgur, and Facebook and some Unigine today. Generally under Unigine it fails to exceed 65C, but I've disabled thermal throttling in my BIOS anyway so temperature doesn't matter till it hits 70C or so.

    My RAM itself, because of the BCLK OC, is at 1410MHz, the spreaders get warm, but it's nowhere near concerning.

    Hahaha, my entire PC is overclocked except for my hard drives and SSD...Even the fans are at 110%...

    Here it is in its natural habitat at my old grandma-style desk, and here's a closer look at the pump for the 120mm rad. I know a lot of people are into RGB and Thermaltake Riing and those dumb looking Corsair fans, I prefer a solid color.







    Reply to EquineHero
  8. I can't imagine someone spending so much money, time, and effort building a rig like this and then choosing to go with cheap, low-end, poor-quality power supplies. It's like seeing someone restore a classic sports car and then attaching the brakes with duct tape.
    Reply to DSzymborski
  9. DSzymborski said:
    I can't imagine someone spending so much money, time, and effort building a rig like this and then choosing to go with cheap, low-end, poor-quality power supplies. It's like seeing someone restore a classic sports car and then attaching the brakes with duct tape.


    Well you saw in the newer images, I swapped in my Corsair PSU. The Apevia PSU was $55, and the Corsair goes for $45 open box on Amazon.
    Reply to EquineHero
  10. Yeah my point of view is similar, kudos to you for your enthusiasm and hard work towards all the customization, that's a lot of work and quite appealing for people like us - interested in tech and gadgets.

    Opting for a PSU like that is like going mountaineering with top notch equipment but getting cheap rope.

    Even some of the green labeled CX series are not that good but way better than the Apevia thing.
    Reply to Satan-IR
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