Will these Graphics Cards be compatible with my current setup?

My current setup:
CPU - Intel Core i5-3570k 3.40GHz
OS - Windows 7 Ultimate 64-bit SP1
RAM - 16gb
Motherboard - ASRock Z77 Extreme4
HD - 1TB
GPU - AMD Radeon HD 7800 Series
PSU - 850W (50-60 hz)

I am looking to buy a new graphics card as my current one seems to be having issues (see this post for details of that http:// ). I was thinking of either getting a GTX 1060 3gb, GTX 1060 6gb, or GTX 1070. I wanted to check and see if those would be compatible with my current setup - will it work with my motherboard, will there be bottlenecking, Is the PSU good enough, will I need to upgrade any other components in order to use the new card, etc. I just wanted to confirm these things before I bother buying a new card.
Reply to jefflajoie1
35 answers Last reply
More about graphics cards compatible current setup
  1. Your board has PCIe 3.0 slots, so yes, those cards should function as intended in that motherboard. I have seen a few cases where a lack of bios support for newer generation cards on very old motherboards was an issue, but that is usually when using a newer PCI generation card with an older generation slot, ie, a 3.0 gen card in a motherboard designed for 2.0 cards, despite them supposedly being backwards compatible.

    Normally it works fine and in you case I'm pretty certain that it is supported.

    I would like to note however that based on your previous thread I am not convinced the graphics card is the problem.

    What is the model of your power supply and how long has it been in service, approximately?

    This may also be relevant, even if the power supply is not the source of your current problems, to the purchase of a new graphics card as well. Depending on what you have, it may not be advisable to use it with a brand new graphics card depending on what sort of platform it uses and how old it is, in addition to the basic question of what is it's quality level.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  2. darkbreeze said:
    Your board has PCIe 3.0 slots, so yes, those cards should function as intended in that motherboard. I have seen a few cases where a lack of bios support for newer generation cards on very old motherboards was an issue, but that is usually when using a newer PCI generation card with an older generation slot, ie, a 3.0 gen card in a motherboard designed for 2.0 cards, despite them supposedly being backwards compatible.

    Normally it works fine and in you case I'm pretty certain that it is supported.

    I would like to note however that based on your previous thread I am not convinced the graphics card is the problem.

    What is the model of your power supply and how long has it been in service, approximately?

    This may also be relevant, even if the power supply is not the source of your current problems, to the purchase of a new graphics card as well. Depending on what you have, it may not be advisable to use it with a brand new graphics card depending on what sort of platform it uses and how old it is, in addition to the basic question of what is it's quality level.


    This is my PSU http:// . I had this computer built about 4 years ago so all the parts are that old (including the PSU), I wonder if they are all due to be replaced soon or if some may be fine for a while longer?
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  3. I was almost, very surprisingly, going to tell you that was actually a good unit although I had never heard of Xion power supplies. My Who's who of power supplies reference material indicates it being made by Super Flower, who is well respected, however further investigation revealed that while Super Flower does, or did, make a few limited model numbers for Xion, that is not one of them.

    That unit is made by Sirtec, and it's not one of Sirtec's better showings. Not that they are well known for quality, but they've been getting better recently, however that unit is too old to be one of Sirtecs more recent, much improved platforms.

    Seems according to the data at RealHardTechX, that platform is actually only capable of sustaining about 750w rather than 850w like it's labeling and marketing say. Based off the amperage ratings for each rail, I'd say they had WAY over exaggerated their numbers as well. Looking into this platform I can't find any mention of it or it's platform on the Orion database, Jonny Guru website, our own Who's who in power supplies (Had the wrong info actually) or the RealHardTechX database, other than what I've already mentioned.

    This usually means it's pretty bad, else there would be database recognition or a solid review of the platform somewhere. In cases like this I have no choice but to recommend replacement, and as soon as possible, because these kinds of units are generally not well built and while one might last ten years, another may explode into flames taking your entire system and in some cases a lot more than that out with it.

    And if you think I'm exaggerating, I'm not. I can show you the money, so to speak.

    Anyhow, probably be a VERY good idea to allow for a new power supply no matter what else you do. You really want to try and stick to units made or sold by Seasonic or Super Flower, as those are the two premier PSU manufacturers, and you really can't go wrong with almost any of their own branded units (There are a couple, very few, exceptions) or anything listed on tiers 1 or 2 here (Pay very close attention to EXACT model numbers, because often there are different models within the same series with wildly different quality and specs, built by entirely different manufacturers even though they migh both say they are X or Y series units, just as an example):

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2547993/psu-tier-list.html

    I think there is a VERY good chance that the power supply COULD be the source of your troubles, and not the graphics card at all. Do you know anybody with a solid power supply that might loan it to you long enough to test your system in order to eliminate whether the graphics card still fails or if it works with a good PSU installed?

    If so, might be good to try that first. If not, it probably wouldn't be a bad idea to get a new PSU, since you may need it anyway, and then test it with your current GPU card to see if the problem goes away or remains. Might not even have to get a new card, unless you want to anyhow.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  4. darkbreeze said:
    I was almost, very surprisingly, going to tell you that was actually a good unit although I had never heard of Xion power supplies. My Who's who of power supplies reference material indicates it being made by Super Flower, who is well respected, however further investigation revealed that while Super Flower does, or did, make a few limited model numbers for Xion, that is not one of them.

    That unit is made by Sirtec, and it's not one of Sirtec's better showings. Not that they are well known for quality, but they've been getting better recently, however that unit is too old to be one of Sirtecs more recent, much improved platforms.

    Seems according to the data at RealHardTechX, that platform is actually only capable of sustaining about 750w rather than 850w like it's labeling and marketing say. Based off the amperage ratings for each rail, I'd say they had WAY over exaggerated their numbers as well. Looking into this platform I can't find any mention of it or it's platform on the Orion database, Jonny Guru website, our own Who's who in power supplies (Had the wrong info actually) or the RealHardTechX database, other than what I've already mentioned.

    This usually means it's pretty bad, else there would be database recognition or a solid review of the platform somewhere. In cases like this I have no choice but to recommend replacement, and as soon as possible, because these kinds of units are generally not well built and while one might last ten years, another may explode into flames taking your entire system and in some cases a lot more than that out with it.

    And if you think I'm exaggerating, I'm not. I can show you the money, so to speak.

    Anyhow, probably be a VERY good idea to allow for a new power supply no matter what else you do. You really want to try and stick to units made or sold by Seasonic or Super Flower, as those are the two premier PSU manufacturers, and you really can't go wrong with almost any of their own branded units (There are a couple, very few, exceptions) or anything listed on tiers 1 or 2 here (Pay very close attention to EXACT model numbers, because often there are different models within the same series with wildly different quality and specs, built by entirely different manufacturers even though they migh both say they are X or Y series units, just as an example):

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2547993/psu-tier-list.html

    I think there is a VERY good chance that the power supply COULD be the source of your troubles, and not the graphics card at all. Do you know anybody with a solid power supply that might loan it to you long enough to test your system in order to eliminate whether the graphics card still fails or if it works with a good PSU installed?

    If so, might be good to try that first. If not, it probably wouldn't be a bad idea to get a new PSU, since you may need it anyway, and then test it with your current GPU card to see if the problem goes away or remains. Might not even have to get a new card, unless you want to anyhow.


    I was planning on getting a new GPU anyway, but I would prefer to wait for prices to drop a bit if I can. Say I wanted to get the GTX 1070, is there a specific PSU you would recommend? Also I am not sure if I would be able to borrow a PSU but I think it would be a good idea just to buy a new one at this point. I don't know what your opinion of PC Gamer is but they recommended the EVGA SuperNOVA G1 650W. That one is not on the tier list but is it still good enough, or should I go for the G2?
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  5. You don't want the G1. What country are you in and where can you primarily get computer hardware from as far as online vendors are concerned? Or are you planning to buy from a local store or shop?
    Reply to darkbreeze
  6. darkbreeze said:
    You don't want the G1. What country are you in and where can you primarily get computer hardware from as far as online vendors are concerned? Or are you planning to buy from a local store or shop?


    I live in the US and usually buy online. Amazon or Newegg most likely.
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  7. Nice. Ok. Do you think you will be more likely to go with the GTX 1060 or the 1070? Did you have a particular capacity preference? What do you think your max budget is for the PSU. Heck, for the GPU card AND PSU for that matter. Might make a recommendation for that based on your current hardware.


    Any chance you'll be upgrading the rest of the system in the near future?
    Reply to darkbreeze
  8. darkbreeze said:
    Nice. Ok. Do you think you will be more likely to go with the GTX 1060 or the 1070? Did you have a particular capacity preference? What do you think your max budget is for the PSU. Heck, for the GPU card AND PSU for that matter. Might make a recommendation for that based on your current hardware.


    Any chance you'll be upgrading the rest of the system in the near future?


    I'd like the 1070 but the cost is a bit steep at the moment, around $400 or more last time I checked. Getting a 1060 6gb for $250 would be nice but I might decide to go for the 1070 if it will be noticeably better. The PSU appears to be around $120 but it sounds like getting a good PSU is important so I would be ok spending that if it will last a long time. One thing I might do is wait for the 1070 to drop in price (as long as the power supply fixes my current problem).

    I would probably be upgrading the other components too but I don't know if I can afford to upgrade them all at once.
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  9. This is probably the best unit based on the needs of your system, and will work well with whichever graphics card you choose to go with, and whether or not you upgrade the rest of the system at some point. This is a very high quality unit that will serve as a highly reliable cornerstone for the rest of your build, and possibly for several builds to come.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant


    Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $79.99
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-05 02:52 EST-0500

    It's also got Gold rated efficiency, so it going to waste a bit less power than your previous unit which has the additional benefit of creating less heat.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  10. darkbreeze said:
    This is probably the best unit based on the needs of your system, and will work well with whichever graphics card you choose to go with, and whether or not you upgrade the rest of the system at some point. This is a very high quality unit that will serve as a highly reliable cornerstone for the rest of your build, and possibly for several builds to come.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant


    Power Supply: SeaSonic - FOCUS Plus Gold 650W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($79.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $79.99
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-05 02:52 EST-0500

    It's also got Gold rated efficiency, so it going to waste a bit less power than your previous unit which has the additional benefit of creating less heat.


    Thank you, I will probably be ordering that PSU. I will see if that fixes the problem, but if it doesn't do you recommend I replace the GPU at that point?
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  11. I don't see any other option really. Feel free to get back with me at any point if you need assistance or input on the matter at all. Good luck and hopefully that was your problem. Keep in mind too that with a bad power supply it's NOT uncommon for the graphics card to also be damaged due to behaviors from the offending power supply such as power fluctuations, advanced levels of electrical noise and ripple or simply shorted circuit high current draws, so it won't be incredibly surprising if both had issues but we'll hope that it was just the PSU.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  12. darkbreeze said:
    I don't see any other option really. Feel free to get back with me at any point if you need assistance or input on the matter at all. Good luck and hopefully that was your problem. Keep in mind too that with a bad power supply it's NOT uncommon for the graphics card to also be damaged due to behaviors from the offending power supply such as power fluctuations, advanced levels of electrical noise and ripple or simply shorted circuit high current draws, so it won't be incredibly surprising if both had issues but we'll hope that it was just the PSU.


    I got that PSU and installed it into my computer. I am still getting the same issue where I can't get past the windows logo unless I physically remove the GPU, so I will probably be ordering a new one. I did want to mention a few things I noticed that may or may not need to be addressed. When I power on my computer a bunch of numbers show up on my Motherboard. I noticed 4F, then a bunch of numbers including 99, then it settled on A2. Another thing is that the "Clr Cmos" button lights up (although I think it stopped lighting up when I took out the GPU).

    Also, I noticed the fan on my CPU doesn't appear to be spinning. I am not sure if it is supposed to always be spinning or if it just turns on at certain times. Before this problem started I ran a test to show how hot my components were getting and it didn't seem to be getting that hot, so not sure if there is a problem there or not.

    And finally, I heard a noise in my PSU that sounded like something was loose inside it. Maybe this is normal and nothing to worry about. It was only when I was holding it in my hands before installing it, not when the computer is running.

    I decided to add to this post rather than create a new post just in case these issues are related to the original problem. After I install the new GPU I will let you know how that goes.
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  13. I was looking up GPUs and I found the GTX 1070 Founders Edition on Nvidia's own website for $400. I also found some that are "mini". Can I use a mini or do I need a normal GPU? Is the Founders Edition okay or should I get an aftermarket card? The cheapest aftermarket cards I found were around $420.
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  14. It is ALWAYS supposed to be spinning. Anytime the computer is powered up at all. That is a problem.

    Not that it's YOUR fault, but it would have been better if we had known this before. Well, let's move on as it's too late to worry about whether or not you bought a PSU for nothing and at least you have a known good one now so that eliminates that from the equation anyhow.

    From the ASRock manual

    Quote:
    A0 through A7 are Problem related to IDE or SATA devices. Please re-install IDE and SATA devices. If the problem still exists, please clear CMOS and try removing all SATA devices.


    So here's what I'd suggest.

    With the unit off, unplug the power from the wall. Remove the CMOS battery from the motherboard and leave it out for about five minutes. While it is out, unplug the CPU fan from the motherboard and make sure that none of the wires going to the fan on the CPU cooler are broken or frayed. Usually if this happens it is near where the wiring goes into the body of the fan, but it could happen anywhere, especially if there is a bend or kind in the wiring anywhere. You might need a magnifying glass or some higher powered reading glasses to see if anything looks funky.

    Check to see that there are no bent or broken pins on the CPU_FAN 1 header where the CPU cooler fan was plugged into. Check to see that it IS in fact the CPU_FAN 1 header, as labeled on the motherboard itself, that it was plugged into and NOT the CPU FAN 2 header, unless you have a CPU cooler with only a three pin connector instead of a four pin connector, then I suppose it should be on the CPU FAN2 header.

    If everything looks ok, plug it back in making absolutely certain to fully seat the plug and that the key on the header matches up with the slot on the fan connector so that it is plugged in correctly. I've seen people try to plug them in by mistake with one pin off the side of the connector or the connector reversed from the way it's supposed to by. Easy to do if you don't do it all the time. They are only supposed to go on one way, not ok both ways.

    Next, unplug all of the SATA cables going to your storage drives from the motherboard and unplug the power cables from any/all drives as well.

    Put the CMOS battery back in, plug the power cable back in, turn the system on and check to see if the CPU fan is working now. If it is, see if you can get into the bios and if you can then go back out of the bios and turn the power back off. Now, plug your main drive with the OS on it back in to power and to the motherboard SATA 0 header and see if you can boot and whether or not you still have the same error code.


    If the CPU fan did NOT come on and run normally, we need to figure out what is going on with that before we do anything else.

    What model is your CPU cooler and how old is it?

    Do you have any spare fans that are the same number of pins as the one on your CPU cooler that could be used to test the header for the CPU fan?
    If the motherboard doesn't detect a fan signal on one of the CPU fan headers, it will generally not allow the system to boot.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  15. You don't want a mini unless you have to use one because of a small form factor or mini-ITX case. Only if there is no room for a standard sized one. They are not as powerful usually as the full size ones and they definitely have weaker cooling systems so there is less potential for overclocking plus the factory performance level is generally set to a lower, less aggressive configuration so that it won't create as much heat since it has a smaller cooling setup.


    This is probably the best deal going right now.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB SC Gaming ACX 3.0 Video Card ($419.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $419.99
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-08 00:24 EST-0500


    Or, if you want to go with AMD, you could go with Vega 56 that uses a bit more power but seems to wallop the GTX 1070 in a number of titles and at a number of resolutions. I prefer Nvidia cards since they usually have better performance to power ratios, but the Vega cards aren't a terrible option if you can get better performance for the same price or just very slightly less:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    Video Card: PowerColor - Radeon RX VEGA 56 8GB Video Card ($404.98 @ Newegg)
    Total: $404.98
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-08 00:38 EST-0500
    Reply to darkbreeze
  16. darkbreeze said:
    It is ALWAYS supposed to be spinning. Anytime the computer is powered up at all. That is a problem.

    Not that it's YOUR fault, but it would have been better if we had known this before. Well, let's move on as it's too late to worry about whether or not you bought a PSU for nothing and at least you have a known good one now so that eliminates that from the equation anyhow.

    From the ASRock manual

    Quote:
    A0 through A7 are Problem related to IDE or SATA devices. Please re-install IDE and SATA devices. If the problem still exists, please clear CMOS and try removing all SATA devices.


    So here's what I'd suggest.

    With the unit off, unplug the power from the wall. Remove the CMOS battery from the motherboard and leave it out for about five minutes. While it is out, unplug the CPU fan from the motherboard and make sure that none of the wires going to the fan on the CPU cooler are broken or frayed. Usually if this happens it is near where the wiring goes into the body of the fan, but it could happen anywhere, especially if there is a bend or kind in the wiring anywhere. You might need a magnifying glass or some higher powered reading glasses to see if anything looks funky.

    Check to see that there are no bent or broken pins on the CPU_FAN 1 header where the CPU cooler fan was plugged into. Check to see that it IS in fact the CPU_FAN 1 header, as labeled on the motherboard itself, that it was plugged into and NOT the CPU FAN 2 header, unless you have a CPU cooler with only a three pin connector instead of a four pin connector, then I suppose it should be on the CPU FAN2 header.

    If everything looks ok, plug it back in making absolutely certain to fully seat the plug and that the key on the header matches up with the slot on the fan connector so that it is plugged in correctly. I've seen people try to plug them in by mistake with one pin off the side of the connector or the connector reversed from the way it's supposed to by. Easy to do if you don't do it all the time. They are only supposed to go on one way, not ok both ways.

    Next, unplug all of the SATA cables going to your storage drives from the motherboard and unplug the power cables from any/all drives as well.

    Put the CMOS battery back in, plug the power cable back in, turn the system on and check to see if the CPU fan is working now. If it is, see if you can get into the bios and if you can then go back out of the bios and turn the power back off. Now, plug your main drive with the OS on it back in to power and to the motherboard SATA 0 header and see if you can boot and whether or not you still have the same error code.


    If the CPU fan did NOT come on and run normally, we need to figure out what is going on with that before we do anything else.

    What model is your CPU cooler and how old is it?

    Do you have any spare fans that are the same number of pins as the one on your CPU cooler that could be used to test the header for the CPU fan?
    If the motherboard doesn't detect a fan signal on one of the CPU fan headers, it will generally not allow the system to boot.


    There were two cables coming out of the CPU fan that looked like they may have been bent and possibly damaged. I am unsure, but here is a picture http:// (it is quite dusty, I did try to dust it off a bit but there is still more). The small white spot is what I am talking about.

    It was plugged into the CPU_FAN 1 header which appeared to be fine. I followed your instructions and the fan still isn't spinning and I am still getting the same error codes.

    Are CPU cooler and CPU fan two different things? Sorry if I am not very knowledgeable about all this. As far as I am aware I did not buy anything separate so it would just be whatever came with the processor (Intel Core i5-3570k 3.40GHz). I don't have any spare fans.

    Also, when I got to the step where I put the CMOS battery back in and powered up, it brought up a screen that said:

    "Copyright (C) 2011 American Megatrends, Inc.
    BIOS Date: 07/11/2013 17:42:27
    Z77 Extreme4 UEFI P2.90
    CPU: Intel (R) Core(TM) i5-3570k CPU @ 3.40GHz Speed:3400MHz
    Total Memory: 16126MB

    CMOS Date/Time Not Set
    Press F2 or DEL to Run Setup
    Press F1 to Continue"

    Then it set the clock to 7/11/13.


    Do you think buying a new CPU fan/cooler would be a good idea?
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  17. You're (Insert expletive here) joking me right?


    Do you NOT realize that your CPU cooler is COMPLETELY packed full of dust and grime? You are surprised that it doesn't work? I'd laugh but honestly it's really not that funny considering. This has probably been your entire problem for quite some while now. There is NO POSSIBLE way that you could not have had CPU temperatures that were far above acceptable levels.

    Yes, after seeing that you definitely need a new CPU cooler. While you might be able to remove the cooler, completely clean all the crap out of the heatsink after removing the fan, clean all the thermal paste off the bottom of the heatsink and the top of the CPU lid using isopropyl alcohol (Or thermal paste remover specifically made for that, but NOTHING else except those two things) repaste using a drop of thermal paste about 1/3 the size of a new #2 pencil eraser, reinstall the heatsink and reinstall the fan, but honestly I'm pretty sure that the fan motor has probably burned up from not being able to spin anymore. Get a new CPU cooler then get with me on how to clean and install the new cooler, before you do anything else.

    Holy jesus, that's right up there with some of the worst ones I've seen. I've seen worse, but not many.

    I'd really recommend getting a cooler that's better than the stock cooler, but if you just want to get another stock replacment I suppose that's better than nothing. Let me know if you want me to help you figure out what cooler to get or make a recommendation. Think about how much you can afford to spend on one and also how long you plan to keep this system before there being any chance of upgrading to something newer. Might be a good idea to get a cooler you can reuse on a newer system too in the event you do upgrade at some point.

    Don't be too terribly surprised if that time is sooner than you think. With the way that cooler is packed full, and the chances that you've been running it overheated for some time, it's totally possible that you may have cooked the CPU as well, but the fact that it does at least show the POST screen is a good sign.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  18. Of more concern, I think, is the nicks in the wires going to the fan in the upper right corner. If those broke the conductor, it could stop the fan from running, or if it's caught in the fan, it won't spin.

    While the dust is bad, I don't think it's quite at the stage of stalling the fan.
    Reply to Someone Somewhere
  19. I'm not sure about that. He did say he had already cleaned it, so it was likely a good deal worse before. But you're right and I did notice those as well. Kind of figured maybe it was a moot point with it packed full and clearly many years old anyhow. Could actually be either or, but bad no matter how you look at it.

    Looking more closely though I can clearly see there are breaks in the wire that I only "thought" might be breaks in the wire on the first look. I think it's also possible though that given the age of the insulation he may have created those breaks when he was moving the wiring around to unplug and plug the connector as I had asked him to do. Who knows, either way, it's done.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  20. As you can tell this is my first time repairing/upgrading a computer. My last computer was a laptop for school and the one before that was the family computer.

    Do you recommend any good cpu coolers? It would be nice to have one even if I get a new cpu, depending on the cost.

    Also before taking that picture I cleaned some dust off of the fan blades and the loose dust on the rest but anything that is "packed in" I hadn't touched yet.
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  21. The Cryorig H7, which is an outstanding cooler for the price, even at it's normal price, is only sale on Newegg right now for 28 bucks. It's much shorter than most tower style coolers so it will often fit even in cases that can't normally support most 120 or 140mm cpu coolers.

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA4UF2DZ6565&ignorebbr=1


    The only question though is whether there is room to install a tower cooler or if you have a case that requires a smaller "downdraft" style cooler similar, but far superior to the stock style cooler.

    Do you have an aftermarket case or is that a prebuilt system? If it's a prebuilt system I'll need to know the model number, and, if you can take a measurement from approximately where the top of the CPU itself would be to where any cooler would hit the side panel once installed, that would be helpful in determining if a specific cooler will fit or not.

    If it needs a downdraft (also known as "top down") style cooler then perhaps something like this would be a good replacement and I think it's probably the best option if this style cooler must be used. In Frostytech's testing this unit achieved one of the best scores ever recorded for coolers that were 100mm tall or less, and if the overall score is adjusted for noise levels, it becomes the best ever for coolers 100mm or less. At least, based on coolers THEY have tested AND only so far as what had been tested at that point in time which was in 2015.

    Regardless, considering you have a stock configuration and are not overlclocking, this would be a very good choice and probably somewhat overkill, but considering even the stock cooler is similar in price,


    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU Cooler: Intel - BXTS15A CPU Cooler ($28.61 @ Amazon)
    Total: $28.61
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-09 15:35 EST-0500


    this is a very good option and can almost certainly be used with whatever you might ugrade to in the future so long as BeQuiet provides mounting hardware for that specific socket when the time comes.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU Cooler: be quiet! - SHADOW ROCK LP 51.4 CFM CPU Cooler ($28.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $28.99
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-09 15:28 EST-0500
    Reply to darkbreeze
  22. darkbreeze said:
    Do you have an aftermarket case or is that a prebuilt system? If it's a prebuilt system I'll need to know the model number, and, if you can take a measurement from approximately where the top of the CPU itself would be to where any cooler would hit the side panel once installed, that would be helpful in determining if a specific cooler will fit or not.


    This is my case http:// . I measured about 6.5 inches from the top of the CPU / bottom of the heatsink to the side of the case. This was not a prebuilt system, I ordered the parts and had a friend put it together originally.
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  23. That case supports coolers up to 170mm in height. That means just about all of them.

    Since that's the case, I'd probably recommend going with one of these. All of them are good so it's up to you which one you like better, but I'd lean towards the Cryorig or BeQuiet, not because they are outlandishly better than the Gammaxx, but because the quality of the heatsinks and especially of the fans, is much higher and is likely to last considerably longer than the fan on the Gammaxx, and be noticeably quieter as well.

    Choice #1 would be : https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=9SIA4UF2DZ6565&ignorebbr=1

    Choice #2: https://www.superbiiz.com/detail.php?name=FAN-BK009&c=CJ

    Choice #3: https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16835856005&ignorebbr=1&nm_mc=AFC-C8Junction&cm_mmc=AFC-C8Junction-PCPartPicker,%20LLC-_-na-_-na-_-na&cm_sp=&AID=10446076&PID=3938566&SID=


    And that would pretty much be the order I'd recommend them in too, but since you are not overclocking any of them will work. If you think you might decide to overclock, either now OR later, then I'd make some changes to those recommendations but you'd be looking at spending anywhere between 15 and 35 dollars more depending on which cooler you chose. If you know for certain you'll never want to bother with overclocking then any of these will probably last you indefinitely.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  24. I have no plans to overclock. I ordered the cryorig and I'll let you know when I have it. Thank you for your help so far.
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  25. Absolutely. My pleasure.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  26. I have the GPU. Can I install it now or should I wait to replace the CPU fan first?
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  27. Yeah, I would wait. You shouldn't even run that system until the new cooler is installed.

    Plus, installing the new CPU cooler will be a lot easier to do without a graphics card in the way.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  28. The cpu cooler came in today
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  29. Nice. Are you planning to install the cooler with the motherboard still in the case or are you going to remove the motherboard first? It's EASIER to install with the motherboard out, but not STRICTLY necessary. It can be installed with the motherboard still in the case, but it's a bit harder to do. I'd do it with it in the case myself, but I have experience doing this with many coolers. It might not be so easy for everybody. Still, if you are halfway intelligent which I believe YOU are (I wouldn't recommend this to EVERY person, that's for sure), it should not be too much of a problem so long as you make yourself very familiar with what you are going to do before you do it.

    The reason is, it does not install the same as the stock cooler, so it is more involved. These should help and I would suggest that you watch them several times, each one, just to make sure you are familiar, and then read through the instructions that came with it a couple of times as well. You cannot know TOO much about what you are doing, no matter what you are doing. More is always better. :)

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KrROVq0cdCY

    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kNF-GHQthro
    Reply to darkbreeze
  30. I installed the CPU cooler and the new GPU. Everything seems to be working fine. I ran The Witcher 3 on Ultra but only for a few minutes. I ran Speccy and it said the CPU was at 32 degrees, Motherboard at 35, GPU at 49, and HDD at 40. I don't know if these numbers are good indicators or not since I wasn't running the game for long. What would good temperatures be?

    Also, when installing the CPU cooler I tried my best to apply the thermal paste correctly. Is there any way to tell if I did it right? Would the CPU get really hot or would something happen if I did not do it correctly? Are there any signs I should be looking out for?

    At this point it appears the problems have been fixed, I just want to make sure I don't run into any more problems anytime soon that could be avoided. Is there anything else that you recommend I do at this point?
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  31. How much thermal paste did you apply, and how did you apply it?

    What you want to do to verify thermal compliance is put the CPU under a full load by running Prime95 version 26.6, and ONLY version 26.6, on Small FFT option, for about 15 minutes. If none of the CPU core temps exceed about 80°C then you are ok. Monitor temps using CoreTemp.

    Prime95 v26.6: http://windows-downloads-center.blogspot.com/2011/04/prime95-266.html


    CoreTemp: http://www.alcpu.com/CoreTemp/
    Reply to darkbreeze
  32. What I read said to put a dot that is slightly smaller than a pea in the middle of the CPU then when you apply the cooler it spreads it out, which is what I did. I ran Prime95 and the highest temp reached was 61C - here is the screenshot http://
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  33. Then that is perfect. That's the right amount of TIM and the temps are good. I'd say you are good to go and this thread was a success. Can't see your screenshot though. Looks like your link got truncated.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  34. Thank you for all your help with this, I appreciate it
    Reply to jefflajoie1
  35. Anytime. My pleasure. Good luck to you.
    Reply to darkbreeze
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