Solved

FM2+: Recommend a Motherboard (AMD A10-5700, 8 GB RAM, Radeon HD 7570)

What motherboard would you buy to complete a PC with the following components? What is your view on upgrading this build in the future? I have in mind a PCIe SSD and AMD Athlon X4 880K 4.2GHz. Is a PCIe SSD much more worth it than a SATA SSD?



Full Spec.'s:


Retail site: https://is.gd/hzTnyT

Purchased in 2012:
Budget: variable

PSU: Internal 300W (100V-240V)
Form factor: Internal ATX
Total wattage: 300W
Nominal input voltage range: 200-240V/3A (50-60Hz)
Dimensions: 150mm x 140mm x 86mm (5.9 x 5.5 x 3.4 inches)

Mini-tower: uATX (~microATX)
Height: 36.8 cm (14.4 inches)
Width: 16.5 cm (6.4 inches)
Depth: 38.9 cm (15.3 inches)
Weight: 8 Kg (17.6 lbs) - without packaging


Reply to Michael Scott
13 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about fm2 recommend motherboard amd a10 5700 ram radeon 7570
  1. 1| Make and model of your PSU? How old is it?
    2| The FM2+ socket will allow you to drop in an A10-7800series as the absolute maximum APU. If you're looking at a processor only then the x4 880K Athlon.
    3| What sort of a budget are we looking at and what form factor are you bound by? In that aspect, what is the make and model of your chassis?

    I personally prefer mitx builds but then again, it's not everyone's cup of tea.
    Reply to Lutfij
  2. Thank you for you reply.

    OP's updated and edited for user @Lutfij.
    Reply to Michael Scott
  3. Michael Scott said:
    What motherboard would you buy to complete a PC with the following components? What is your view on upgrading this build in the future? I have in mind a PCIe SSD and AMD Athlon X4 880K 4.2GHz. Is a PCIe SSD much more worth it than a SATA SSD?



    Full Spec.'s:


    Retail site: https://is.gd/hzTnyT

    Purchased in 2012:
    Budget: variable

    PSU: Internal 300W (100V-240V)
    Form factor: Internal ATX
    Total wattage: 300W
    Nominal input voltage range: 200-240V/3A (50-60Hz)
    Dimensions: 150mm x 140mm x 86mm (5.9 x 5.5 x 3.4 inches)

    Mini-tower: uATX (~microATX)
    Height: 36.8 cm (14.4 inches)
    Width: 16.5 cm (6.4 inches)
    Depth: 38.9 cm (15.3 inches)
    Weight: 8 Kg (17.6 lbs) - without packaging





    You shouldn't be buying any kind of SSD when your rig is that old.
    It would be better if you upgraded your rig first, to a Ryzen 1200 with a 1050 or something similar.
    Reply to lakimens
  4. lakimens said:

    You shouldn't be buying any kind of SSD when your rig is that old.
    It would be better if you upgraded your rig first, to a Ryzen 1200 with a 1050 or something similar.


    I agree, but I can use the SSD in a future build after I retire this one at some point down the line?
    Reply to Michael Scott
  5. Michael Scott said:
    lakimens said:

    You shouldn't be buying any kind of SSD when your rig is that old.
    It would be better if you upgraded your rig first, to a Ryzen 1200 with a 1050 or something similar.


    I agree, but I can use the SSD in a future build after I retire this one at some point down the line?



    Well, the best CPU is the AMD 880K and the best SSD for the money is Samsung 850 EVO, a cheaper one is ADATA SP600 or SP550.
    Reply to lakimens
  6. lakimens said:
    Michael Scott said:
    lakimens said:

    You shouldn't be buying any kind of SSD when your rig is that old.
    It would be better if you upgraded your rig first, to a Ryzen 1200 with a 1050 or something similar.


    I agree, but I can use the SSD in a future build after I retire this one at some point down the line?



    Well, the best CPU is the AMD 880K and the best SSD for the money is Samsung 850 EVO, a cheaper one is ADATA SP600 or SP550.


    Thank you, I agree with those recommendations. Which motherboard would you recommend to house those components?
    Reply to Michael Scott
  7. Michael Scott said:
    lakimens said:
    Michael Scott said:
    lakimens said:

    You shouldn't be buying any kind of SSD when your rig is that old.
    It would be better if you upgraded your rig first, to a Ryzen 1200 with a 1050 or something similar.


    I agree, but I can use the SSD in a future build after I retire this one at some point down the line?



    Well, the best CPU is the AMD 880K and the best SSD for the money is Samsung 850 EVO, a cheaper one is ADATA SP600 or SP550.


    Thank you, I agree with those recommendations. Which motherboard would you recommend to house those components?


    Dude, if you're also buying a motherboard, get a Ryzen 1200 with an A320 motherboard and some 8GB DDR4 RAM. It will cost maybe $50-$70 more, but be 10x powerful.
    Reply to lakimens
  8. lakimens said:
    Michael Scott said:
    lakimens said:
    Michael Scott said:
    lakimens said:

    You shouldn't be buying any kind of SSD when your rig is that old.
    It would be better if you upgraded your rig first, to a Ryzen 1200 with a 1050 or something similar.


    I agree, but I can use the SSD in a future build after I retire this one at some point down the line?



    Well, the best CPU is the AMD 880K and the best SSD for the money is Samsung 850 EVO, a cheaper one is ADATA SP600 or SP550.


    Thank you, I agree with those recommendations. Which motherboard would you recommend to house those components?


    Dude, if you're also buying a motherboard, get a Ryzen 1200 with an A320 motherboard and some 8GB DDR4 RAM. It will cost maybe $50-$70 more, but be 10x powerful.


    Check my understanding: it's better to spend a little more and invest in a totally new system, than to spend any money on the old rig?
    I agree; I think you're right, but I also have this old pre-built I would like to get working again, and it only needs a new motherboard for <$100. Otherwise the RAM, CPU, and iGPU are all thrown away (I don't want the hassle of selling on eBay).

    If I did invest in a new system, I'd put it towards my main gaming rig. I'd save to buy a powerful Skylake CPU e.g. i7-6700K, and a GTX 1070/GTX 1080.

    In summary, I'd like to get this old pre-built going as a family PC; or do you think it's not worth it and I should chuck it?
    Reply to Michael Scott
  9. Michael Scott said:
    What motherboard would you buy to complete a PC with the following components? What is your view on upgrading this build in the future? I have in mind a PCIe SSD and AMD Athlon X4 880K 4.2GHz. Is a PCIe SSD much more worth it than a SATA SSD?



    Full Spec.'s:


    Retail site: https://is.gd/hzTnyT

    Purchased in 2012:
    Budget: variable

    PSU: Internal 300W (100V-240V)
    Form factor: Internal ATX
    Total wattage: 300W
    Nominal input voltage range: 200-240V/3A (50-60Hz)
    Dimensions: 150mm x 140mm x 86mm (5.9 x 5.5 x 3.4 inches)

    Mini-tower: uATX (~microATX)
    Height: 36.8 cm (14.4 inches)
    Width: 16.5 cm (6.4 inches)
    Depth: 38.9 cm (15.3 inches)
    Weight: 8 Kg (17.6 lbs) - without packaging





    I would go with a standard 480 or 500 GB SSD SATA because of the lower cost currently selling around 150 dollars. This would make your computer faster than most mid range computers out on the market and it should boot up in less than a minute. I would also try to recommend getting another cheap radeon hd 7570 (this should be 20 dollars or less) that's a low profile video card if you can crossfire the cards you have which would give you almost an 80% boost in performance that is close to the current AMD RX 550 video card performance. Should you want to upgrade the power supply for some reason since HP and Dell seem to be miserly in providing power to additional peripherals, the Thermaltake Smart 700W non-modular PSU can occasional be purchased below 40 dollars from Newegg, Amazon, Fry's, etc.

    Are you actually going to get a motherboard for a AMD A10-5700? If so, I can't really give advice to what you should get because the FM2 boards are older and the pricing for all variety of design for the chip is narrower between 40 and 80 dollars. I don't recall any of the board manufacturers in the last 2 years even revising any of their FM2 boards but I could be wrong. The lack of revisions to old, updated, or new boards makes purchasing any of the boards risky in that they may not be able to support Windows 10 and/or several of the device options that have become popular in the last 2 years but you should check the reviews of the boards to see if anyone came up with any problems.
    Reply to fturla
  10. Thank you for your reply. What are your thoughts on the following examples?



    https://is.gd/S0a9cC



    https://is.gd/3mWF2a

    Reply to Michael Scott
  11. Michael Scott said:
    Thank you for your reply. What are your thoughts on the following examples?



    https://is.gd/S0a9cC



    https://is.gd/3mWF2a



    I like GIGABYTE and the second one seems to be newer.
    Reply to lakimens
  12. Michael Scott said:
    Thank you for your reply. What are your thoughts on the following examples?



    https://is.gd/S0a9cC



    https://is.gd/3mWF2a

    Reply to fturla
  13. Best answer
    Hi what do you want your computer to do anyway? From your previous specifications of your old computer, the GPU won't be transferable to your new build unless you use the old motherboard which won't be the case since you are asking what new motherboard to get. THe AMD HD 7570 has a video card rating of about 1000 so you should shoot for an upgrade twice that and the price range I see for older cards in that range would be similar to the GTX 550 Ti. Only get the old version or older architecture video cards that are rated 2000 and above for two reasons. Your cpu is no longer ideal for graphics especially gaming so any significant purchase in the video card department will only be bottlenecked by the cpu in performance. This may be more apparent if you play cpu intensive games such as DOOM or CS GO. I don't suggest you spend over 50 dollars for a card.

    I don't know if you should gamble spending money on getting older video cards or an expensive motherboard since the restricting factor will be your cpu.

    Make a list of what you need the motherboard to do before you pick one. Can you only live with 2 ram slots or do you need 4? Make sure the slots are all the same ram slots and not designed for 2 different ram types such as DDR2, DDR3, or DDR4.
    Don't consider overclocking because it's not worth it because your cpu, ram, or video card will bottleneck the performance anyway. Buying a video card or any peripheral needs to consider if you can use the old 300W PSU you have or do you need to get a more powerful one to be able to use other add on cards to your system. I am assuming you are going with your old 300W HP PSU.

    Don't consider any motherboard over 100 dollars because that's not reasonable for the budget build but if a mother board can be obtained below 100 dollars then you can consider it but not above that price range. Make sure whatever board you pick that you locate the internal speaker connector and make sure that part works because it will tell you if something is wrong with the system when you finally turn the computer on.

    Do you have all the connection features that you want on the motherboard? Too many means you are wasting money on features you will never use.
    Are you going to use legacy parts? The newer motherboards don't have DDR2 ram slots, SCSI or parallel port connections, etc. The older boards don't have USB 3.1, NVME, PCIE, SATA3, Wifi, etc. I don't know what you want, have, are going to use or are willing to buy to adapt. You probably need a new hard drive since old hard drives may not be able to be formatted to use Windows 10. Try to use your old operating system in the new computer but it may not work because the old OS may be intentionally bound to the old hardware. If you have to buy, you can get a new Windows 10 OS for around 20 dollars on the internet and download the OS to your new system.

    The GIGABYTE GA-F2A68HM-H FM2+ seems okay if you can get the latest revision and can tolerate the limitations. Please check the reviews for problems people have faced. But I cannot recommend any FM2 motherboard because I have no experience with those boards to be wary. I am assuming that your budget to build a new computer is only 100 to 300 dollars and not higher than that. Also I think you also want to use old parts from you old computer so my suggestions are not about other alternatives to get a better pc.
    Reply to fturla
Ask a new question Answer

Read More

HD RAM AMD Motherboards Radeon