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PC Build Help: Part Choosing

So I've been considering building a PC for a while. There's still a few things I'm still hung up on though.
1. Would an i5-7500 compare similarly to an i5-7600K or an i7-7700K when it comes to gaming? Or would it not be worth it?
2. Is 16GB RAM and 3TB hard drive a little excessive for gaming?
3. Do I need to splash for a more expensive mobo, or will a cheaper one do?
4. I need a good graphics card. I'm looking at the GTX 1050Ti, but I'm not excactly sold on it.
Here's the full build https://pcpartpicker.com/list/vcRvPs

Thanks in advance :):):):):)
Reply to tredalekeru
41 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about build part choosing
  1. Old Gen Intel is not worth the money after coffee lake. ram too expensive, case and psu are no good. My edits:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($194.29 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock - AB350 Pro4 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($73.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($90.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Toshiba - P300 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($79.89 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: MSI - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB ARMOR OCV1 Video Card ($259.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: Fractal Design - Focus G (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - EVO Edition 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($40.98 @ Newegg)
    Optical Drive: Lite-On - iHAS124-14 DVD/CD Writer ($10.99 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Home OEM 64-bit ($89.89 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: HP - 22cwa 21.5" 1920x1080 60Hz Monitor ($89.99 @ Amazon)
    Keyboard: Redragon - S101 Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($27.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Sades - SA-902-B 7.1 Channel Headset ($71.99 @ Amazon)
    Speakers: Logitech - Z200 0W 2ch Speakers ($22.99 @ Best Buy)
    Total: $1093.95
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-18 23:08 EDT-0400
    Reply to vapour
  2. First of all, you're sacrificing a lot of quality just for the sake of RGB lighting. If you want RGB lighting, buy it. Something like I have in my case, the NZXT Hue+ that comes with two programmable LED strips and a controller, plus the software, for around 55 bucks is a much better way to do RGB if you have to have it. Plus, you can do that later, at any time, without having to make a sacrifice on quality and performance now.

    Second, your choice of power supply is not good. Also, that Hyper T2 CPU cooler is a pile. The Gammax 400 I included was reviewed by our native CPU tester Crashman as being one of the best if not THE best budget 120mm air CPU coolers he'd ever tested, especially for the price.

    3TB storage space is probably not overkill, at all, considering some games require 80GB or more, each, and a full clean windows install comes in around 40-50Gb after you factor in the paging file, hibernation, updates and system restore files.

    16GB of RAM isn't strictly overkill, it's nice to have, but 8GB is fine for a primarily gaming type system. If you were using advanced or professional applications as well, might be a different story.

    Don't risk the Lite-on drive. My experience has been, after about ten historical purchases of their optical drives, that about three in ten are bad. LG has a much better track record, even though they still have some rather cheap lower end drives.

    I think you would be much happier with something like this and you can choose whatever peripheral accessories you want. Everything I've changed has been changed for a reason or due to quality issues.

    Also, that micro-ATX B250 motherboard lacks some features, but more importantly, it's small form factor is going to make it awfully hard to fit a tower cooler, gaming card and RAM, without interference or heat issues from the close proximity. It would work, probably, but using a regular ATX board makes things so much easier on yourself when it comes time to build and anytime you have to get in there to do something. TRUST me on that. micro-ATX and small form factor builds are nice, if you are specifically going for that, but they are a pain to work with or on.

    Also, this case is a huge improvement in quality and all the little features you don't notice until you start trying to assemble your build, or once it's running and you realize it sucks and you wish you'd spent a few more dollars. Getting a really crappy case isn't worth saving twenty bucks on. Believe that.

    I also added a 120mm case fan for the rear exhaust, which is pretty much required, and I didn't notice any fans in your build. This case comes with two front NZXT fans and the one I added is a Noctua, which is about as high quality as it gets.


    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-7500 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($184.69 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: Deepcool - GAMMAXX 400 74.3 CFM CPU Cooler ($23.79 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte - GA-Z270-HD3 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($105.49 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($84.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($74.82 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB GAMING Video Card ($259.88 @ OutletPC)
    Case: Fractal Design - Focus G ATX Mid Tower Case ($44.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($68.59 @ SuperBiiz)
    Optical Drive: LG - GH24NSC0B DVD/CD Writer ($15.49 @ OutletPC)
    Case Fan: Noctua - NF-S12B redux-1200 59.1 CFM 120mm Fan ($13.69 @ Newegg)
    Total: $876.42
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-18 23:33 EDT-0400
    Reply to darkbreeze
  3. Really, I don't need the RGB lighting for my RAM, because I'm already getting LED light strips for the case, but I'm nor 100% sure I need 16GB, but it seems safer than getting 8GB. The optical drive I wouldn't mind exchanging, but for a graphics card, a GTX 1060 could be a good upgrade. But should I go with a single fan or dual? Leaning towards dual right now. The power supply, that's definitely changing. The case, most likely I'll go with what you guys said, the Fractal Design Focus G. The mobo... questionable. VERY questionable. For a CPU, I would take a Ryzen 5 over an i5, but I don't really know if I should just take a Ryzen 7 or an i7-7700K. Plus I don't really need the OS on the list(I have a friend that will let me borrow his Windows 10 flash once I build this). And lastly, the case fan. Not really sure if I need one, or if I really need one. Thanks for your responses :) Updated list here.
    Reply to tredalekeru
  4. Dual fan IS better, but even a single fan 1060 is an aimprovement over the 1050ti you had listed.

    If you can expand the budget for the core components by about 200 bucks I could outline a far superior system to the one you originally outlined, improved even over what I listed and way better than any prebuilt you could get for a similar price.

    If you want an i7 system, expand the budget by about 3 bones. Knowing what your actual financial limit is for the core system, cpu, motherboard, case, gpu, psu, cooling, memory and storage, would make it much easier to get you where you want to be for the best price.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  5. Well, I was hoping to spend under $1,000, but that's not happening, so $1,200 will probably be my max limit as a price tag. I'd like to see this superior systen you mentioned though. Thanks :)
    Reply to tredalekeru
  6. To begin with, the case fan, of course you NEED one. Every single modern ATX mid to full tower system NEEDS to have at MINIMUM, one intake and one exhaust. Minimum. And that's just because without them them the system will begin immediately experiencing thermal fatigue even with a good CPU cooler and would not last very long at all even if it never did anything except sit at idle. Well, at idle it might be ok for a while.

    Anyhow, case fans are terribly important. Your CPU and GPU coolers are just recycling hot air if you don't get plenty of fresh air in and ALL of the hot air out. The more circulation you have the longer everything in your case, RAM, GPU card, CPU, Motherboard, hard drives, are all going to last.

    Are you wanting to pull the trigger on this pretty soon or planning this for down the road a little while? The reason I ask is because many of the parts I might suggest, primarily those for the Coffeelake platform, are not currently in stock anywhere but are expected to be at some point.

    If you want something immediately available then I'll stick to Kaby lake parts.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  7. Well, I'm hoping to try and start buying parts potentially before January, but I'm not in any huge rush to get this built. And also, thank you for the lengthy explanation on the purpose of case fans. Added a few, but not sure if they're any good :-: List here. :)
    Reply to tredalekeru
  8. So then, for the price range, this would be hard to beat. And when it comes to fans, it's kind of hard to beat Noctua. Cryorig, NZXT, Fractal design, Corsair, Scythe, Thermalright, Noiseblocker, these guys all have some good fans, but not all of their fans are good so you have to pay attention to the fan model and investigate professional reviews on them.

    Noctua, well, if they make it, it's good. Period. Pretty much the same with Delta, although Delta mainly makes industrial, OEM and server fans, and doesn't much cater to the enthusiast sector. Everybody else is hit or miss so you have to go strictly by fan model because those other guys all have some pretty terrible fans in addition to some really good ones.

    Do you have any particular color scheme preferences you'd like to try to mainly stick with for the whole build, or just whatever performs well for the price?
    Reply to darkbreeze
  9. Well, I don't really need an RGB fan, since I already got RGB lights. That'll be enough. But besides that, performance is my #1 issue for the build. An RGB would be nice, but I can stick with blue. More changes here. Besides that, I'm thinking this will probably be the setup I'm going with. But if I'm shooting myself in the back, let me know. :)
    Reply to tredalekeru
  10. So, I went with the 8600k because it beats or ties the i7-8700k in most of the gaming benchmarks and is within a few frames in all the rest, but more importantly, it's about a hundred bucks cheaper.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/intel-coffee-lake-core-i5-8600k-cpu,5264-5.html

    https://www.techspot.com/review/1505-intel-core-8th-gen-vs-amd-ryzen/

    The Gammax cooler is not one of the top coolers out there, but it IS one of the top budget coolers as I mentioned before. It's also a MUCH better cooler than the average stock cooler and of course, these newer processors don't come with a cooler anymore anyhow. Plus, it has blue LEDs, so there you go.

    The Gigabyte Z370 HD3 motherboard is not a high end board, but it's plenty good enough for the average gaming rig and much better than some high end boards from only one or two generations ago. It has 4+3 power phase, M.2 storage header, basically a lot of stuff standard that was only found on high end boards with Z97 and Z170.

    16GB-DDR4 3000 G.Skill memory. You wanted 16GB, you got it. Plus, G.Skill is almost certainly the best, most reliable memory brand out there. The Trident-Z modules are a bit better than the Ripjaws, but I had to cut something back in the budget somewhere, so I went with these because they're still better than the majority of memory modules out there.

    Here's the fun stuff.

    I included a Samsung 960 EVO M.2 drive for the operating system and applications. It's only 250GB but that's plenty for the OS and a ton of applications. Here's the thing about M.2 if you are not familiar with the NVME storage speeds on Samsung drives. Generally most regular 2.5" SSDs give you somewhere between 500 and 550MBps sequential read and write speeds with anywhere from 10,000 to 90,000 IOPS random read and write speeds.

    This 960 EVO gives you 3200MBps sequential read and 1500MBps sequential write speeds, and up to 330,000 IOPS random read and write speeds.

    So this is VERY fast storage for the operating system and applications. At minimum, you're looking at three to five times faster than a standard SSD and in some cases possibly 7-10x faster. VERY fast. This is pretty much the second fastest consumer storage drive on the market and it's not far behind the fastest, which is the 960 Pro.

    Also included a 2TB storage drive for games, movies, music, etc.

    GTX 1060 6GB dual fan card, because, "I need a good graphics card". This is a good graphics card. At 1080p it outperforms last generations GTX 980 in most titles and at 1140p and 4k, it almost performs as well as the 980TI. For the price, this is an outstanding value considering guys were paying 6-800 dollars for this kind of performance two years ago.

    The Enthoo Pro M tempered glass case is a wonder for the price. I haven't worked in THIS specific case, but I have built several systems in the Enthoo Pro and Enthoo Pro M original versions and I can tell you that this case has just about every feature you could ever want and is so much easier to build in than the majority of other cases in this price range that it makes you wonder why anybody even bothers with most of the others. Plus with it's full view tempered glass side panel you won't have to worry about scratches like cases with acrylic windows and it's beautiful to boot.

    It also comes with 140mm Phanteks fans. One front intake and one rear exhaust. At some point you might want to add another intake and a top exhaust, but for now that should be just fine. If you ever decide to overclock or if you tend to push the system hard for extended periods, a couple of additional case fans will be a good thing to consider adding. If and when you do I'd suggest adding two more Phanteks fans just like the ones that come with it, or a couple of 140mm Noctua black Chromax fans, which are an even better choice and are probably several decibels quieter.

    Had to drop out the Seasonic power supply to try and keep it near the budget you wanted, but this CX 650M is semi-modular and has very good reviews for a somewhat budget power supply. Obviously another twenty bucks would get you a much better quality Gold rated EVGA or Seasonic unit, but for the price this Corsair unit will be just fine and has a five year warranty.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8600K 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($279.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: Deepcool - GAMMAXX 400 74.3 CFM CPU Cooler ($20.89 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte - Z370 HD3 (rev. 1.0) ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($126.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($148.55 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Storage: Samsung - 960 EVO 250GB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive ($117.49 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Hitachi - Ultrastar 7K3000 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($56.50 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: MSI - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB ARMOR OCV1 Video Card ($269.86 @ B&H)
    Case: Phanteks - Enthoo Pro M Tempered Glass ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair - CXM 650W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Optical Drive: LG - GH24NSC0B DVD/CD Writer ($15.49 @ OutletPC)
    Total: $1205.62
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-21 22:24 EDT-0400


    As I said before, your peripherals and accessories, or any RGB lighting you might want to add can be added at any time. If the budget is a bit stretched right now, don't worry, just add them when you are able to save a few more bucks. Believe me when I say you'll be a lot happier with a long lasting, great performing machine that you can add lighting to later than to skimp on something now just to make some lighting options fit and end up with a system that is not nearly as good as you could have had.

    When you DO get ready to add lighting, I highly recommend the NZXT Hue+. This is what I use and it gives you endless options.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  11. OK, I think I'm ready for this. I'll probably go a little cheaper on the case, because I was already planning on getting a Hue+, and getting the AER fans to go with it. But besides that, I'll stick to this lineup. Added AER fans and peripherals. It's a little more than I expected to spend, but I know this will get me through for a long time. Thanks for all the responses :) You guys are great. http://
    Reply to tredalekeru
  12. No problem. If you ever have questions don't hesitate to ask.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  13. Ok, so this is probably a dead thread by now but I figured out I had WAY more in my budget than I thought, so I made some upgrades. One final look if you please. Thanks.


    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1700 3.0GHz 8-Core Processor ($289.78 @ OutletPC)
    Thermal Compound: Arctic Silver - 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver 3.5g Thermal Paste ($5.39 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte - GA-AX370-Gaming K5 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance RGB 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($179.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: Western Digital - Blue 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($89.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital - Blue 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($63.19 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB AORUS Video Card ($474.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Cooler Master - MasterBox Lite 5 RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($76.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: EVGA - 500W 80+ Certified ATX Power Supply ($37.39 @ SuperBiiz)
    Monitor: Acer - GN246HL 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor ($187.49 @ B&H)
    Keyboard: Redragon - S101 Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($27.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Corsair - Raptor HS40 7.1 Channel Headset ($42.99 @ B&H)
    Total: $1611.04
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-29 17:31 EDT-0400
    Reply to tredalekeru
  14. Edited your post. Sorry. Much easier to look at this way.

    So, right off the bat I'll offer these observations, and you can take them or leave them, for what they're worth.

    I'm not sure the Ryzen 7 is an "upgrade" from the 8700k. Seems that, from the benchmarks I'm seeing, the 8600k either beats or closely ties the Ryzen 7 in almost every game title when choice of CPU makes any difference at all, except for a few that are actually well optimized for a wealth of threads and I promise you that it's the minority of games, still to this day, that do that. But we'll go with AMD if you like that better. Just maybe not THAT model.

    The "wraith" cooler that comes with the Ryzen 7, while perfectly capable for mainstream systems, is not at ALL suitable for a gaming machine that is going to live the vast majority of it's life at gaming loads. I can almost guarantee you will have thermal issues at some point with the stock cooler. At the very least I'd like to see a budget aftermarket cooler like the Gammaxx 400 or Cryorig H7 added to the build. Something like the Cryorig H5 or Noctua NH-U12S or U14S would be a lot better, but even one of those two budget coolers would be a big improvement over the stock cooler.

    Still not a fan of the Corsair RGB memory. The G.Skill memory, even their Ripjaws lineup, uses better IC memory chips and that's been related to me directly in the past by Tradesman1 who probably knows more about memory modules than 99% of people on this planet. IF you like the RGB factor more than having fast, stable, reliable memory that is less likely to have compatibility issues, ever, then that's fine. Corsair sells some good memory too, primarily their Dominator series, I'm just not a big fan of the Vengeance lineup.

    Most important of all though, you've moved from a mediocre mid quality power supply, in the Corsair CXm unit I suggested (Based on price alone. Certainly it's not one of the best units out there, but definitely better than a lot of others in it's class) to a terrible, absolutely terrible EVGA W series unit that is unlikely to make it through the first three months in that build, much less have a long life. That unit is in NO way complementary to the rest of the build and if you make no other changes at all, you definitely need to discard that choice and go with a better unit.

    People don't seem to understand, even though we say it over and over and over again, the power supply is the MOST important component in the entire build, because if ANYTHING is not working correctly with that, then NOTHING else in the whole build is going to be working correctly either. Plus, a crappy PSU is highly inclined to either destroy the rest of your build in one fell shot, or slowly decimate your other components over time due to unacceptable levels of noise and ripple.

    I don't mean to knock your work that you put in, but it seems to me that once again you've moved backwards on this build for the sake of pretty lights and an overkill GPU card. Nice to have the GTX 1070, but the GTX 1060 will probably max out just about any game title you want to play at 1080p, based on your monitor selection. In my opinion, if you have more to spend than originally thought, then this would be the way to do it.

    I promise you that in the end, you'll be a LOT happier with a system that kicks a#$ and keeps doing so for a long time, than one that looks really swell with a bunch of lights and fluff, but doesn't last or simply doesn't work at all because of a couple of poor hardware selections.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 7 1700X 3.4GHz 8-Core Processor ($299.88 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($34.89 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Asus - PRIME X370-A ATX AM4 Motherboard ($116.88 @ OutletPC)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($148.55 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Storage: Western Digital - Blue 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($89.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital - Blue 2TB 3.5" 5400RPM Internal Hard Drive ($63.19 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB AORUS Video Card ($474.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Cooler Master - MasterBox Lite 5 RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($76.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($68.49 @ SuperBiiz)
    Monitor: Acer - GN246HL 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor ($187.49 @ B&H)
    Keyboard: Redragon - S101 Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($27.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Corsair - Raptor HS40 7.1 Channel Headset ($42.99 @ B&H)
    Total: $1632.19
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-29 18:24 EDT-0400
    Reply to darkbreeze
  15. I can sacrifice RGB RAM. I don't care a ton for it. But I was REALLY hoping for that GIGABYTE motherboard so I could hook up RGB Fusion and connect with the case fans, GPU, and potentially the case fan. Power supply... I thought i had switched that out but I guess not. I see why I would need this though, because now I'm considering overclocking the CPU and GPU. I'm really hoping for 1440p, because if thos build can't reach it, I'll go back to a 1060. I just can't bring myself to admit that I don't need RGB lighting. I could probably cut a few hundred dollars if I cut RGB, and then get a quality keyboard and mouse. So please just cut as much RGB as possible, because I won't do it without struggling. But that's not even my biggest pet peeve here.


    It's the fact I still can't decide whether to go Ryzen or Intel. For Intel, I would go with either a 8600K or a 7700K. Maybe a 7700. For Ryzen, anywhere from a 1600X to a 1700X. They both have their perks, but I still can't really make a decision after weeks of research. I'm probably going to play some higher quality games, and I know Intel would be better for it, but Ryzen is good for everyday tasks, and I'm going to need a lot of it. I also might get into streaming and a lot of video rendering with most likely Sony Vegas, and they both lean so close to one side or another I can't really decide.
    Reply to tredalekeru
  16. Best answer
    Ok, so we'll do it your way with the Gigabyte motherboard. Also, if you want to overclock, or even if you don't, seems the 1600x is a much better value because you can attain 1700x stock performance by overclocking but it still gets terrific performance even if you don't. Most review sites say the 1600x is a far better value and perform just as well.

    I did notice too that you made another boo boo. You have a 5400rpm drive in your build. No way you want that in there either. If you're going to stick yourself with a mechanical drive, you make sure it's at least a 7200rpm unit. 5400rpm drives are ok for laptops because they create less heat but you don't want to use them in a desktop unless you already have the drive and are just looking to stack on some additional storage space. Not a fan of the Western digital SSD. Samsung fully rules in performance and longevity in my experience and to the best of my knowledge. Especially when the price difference is like less than six bucks.

    So I put your motherboard back in, added G.Skill Trident Z memory, which is hands down the best consumer enthusiast memory you can get and added the NZXT Hue+, because what the hell, you gotta have some lights, LOL.

    I also changed the graphics card. Still a GTX 1070, but a bit cheaper. Still a very good card with a lot of extra features and it comes with a backplate.

    Try this.
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600X 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($224.49 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H5 Universal 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($42.89 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte - GA-AX370-Gaming K5 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($158.79 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($94.99 @ B&H)
    Storage: Toshiba - P300 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB SC2 Gaming iCX Video Card ($429.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Cooler Master - MasterBox Lite 5 RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($76.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($68.49 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case Accessory: NZXT - Hue+ LED Controller ($52.20 @ Amazon)
    Monitor: Acer - GN246HL 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor ($187.49 @ B&H)
    Keyboard: Redragon - S101 Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($27.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Corsair - Raptor HS40 7.1 Channel Headset ($42.99 @ B&H)
    Total: $1602.27
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-30 02:59 EDT-0400
    Reply to darkbreeze
  17. darkbreeze said:
    Ok, so we'll do it your way with the Gigabyte motherboard. Also, if you want to overclock, or even if you don't, seems the 1600x is a much better value because you can attain 1700x stock performance by overclocking but it still gets terrific performance even if you don't. Most review sites say the 1600x is a far better value and perform just as well.

    I did notice too that you made another boo boo. You have a 5400rpm drive in your build. No way you want that in there either. If you're going to stick yourself with a mechanical drive, you make sure it's at least a 7200rpm unit. 5400rpm drives are ok for laptops because they create less heat but you don't want to use them in a desktop unless you already have the drive and are just looking to stack on some additional storage space. Not a fan of the Western digital SSD. Samsung fully rules in performance and longevity in my experience and to the best of my knowledge. Especially when the price difference is like less than six bucks.

    So I put your motherboard back in, added G.Skill Trident Z memory, which is hands down the best consumer enthusiast memory you can get and added the NZXT Hue+, because what the hell, you gotta have some lights, LOL.

    I also changed the graphics card. Still a GTX 1070, but a bit cheaper. Still a very good card with a lot of extra features and it comes with a backplate.

    Try this.
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600X 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($224.49 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H5 Universal 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($42.89 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte - GA-AX370-Gaming K5 ATX AM4 Motherboard ($134.99 @ Amazon)
    Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($158.79 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($94.99 @ B&H)
    Storage: Toshiba - P300 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB SC2 Gaming iCX Video Card ($429.99 @ Amazon)
    Case: Cooler Master - MasterBox Lite 5 RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($76.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($68.49 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case Accessory: NZXT - Hue+ LED Controller ($52.20 @ Amazon)
    Monitor: Acer - GN246HL 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor ($187.49 @ B&H)
    Keyboard: Redragon - S101 Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($27.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Corsair - Raptor HS40 7.1 Channel Headset ($42.99 @ B&H)
    Total: $1602.27
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-30 02:59 EDT-0400


    OP give this guy a beer.
    I think that a RX 580 8gb is cheaper than a GTX 1070 and has similar performance.
    Reply to xD4rk_
  18. Honestly, I don't want a Hue+ when i can just use RGB Fusion or Aura Sync. That's enough. I went with a ASUS mobo and GPU because. A 1070 is a little overkill, because I doubt I'm going for 1440p, so I went back to a 1060. Also is there any difference bewteen the Trident Z w/o RGB and w/ RGB? If there isn't, I'm taking the RGB.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600X 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($224.49 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H5 Universal 65.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($42.89 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Asus - STRIX B350-F GAMING ATX AM4 Motherboard ($107.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($185.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($94.99 @ B&H)
    Storage: Toshiba - P300 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Asus - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB Strix Video Card ($324.99 @ B&H)
    Case: Cooler Master - MasterBox Lite 5 RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($76.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($68.49 @ SuperBiiz)
    Monitor: Acer - GN246HL 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor ($187.49 @ B&H)
    Keyboard: Redragon - S101 Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($27.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Corsair - Raptor HS40 7.1 Channel Headset ($42.99 @ B&H)
    Total: $1445.26
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-30 13:36 EDT-0400
    Reply to tredalekeru
  19. Not really. Trident Z uses the very best Samsung memory IC chips, so both are or at least should be equally good.


    Yes, that build looks pretty solid now.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  20. One last thing: can I get 1440p gaming out of this or not?
    Reply to tredalekeru
  21. If you want to use medium or slightly higher than medium settings, sure. If you want high settings, or ultra, not a chance, not if you want 60fps or higher.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  22. My confidence is regained. I might switch around the peripherals and maybe use GIGABYTE for a mobo and GPU instead of ASUS, but I'll try to stick to this.
    Reply to tredalekeru
  23. Sounds good. Good luck.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  24. OK. One LAST question. If I were to switch out the mobo with the Intel equivalent and got a 8600K instead of a 1600X, would that have better performance?
    Reply to tredalekeru
  25. For gaming, yes. For multi and mixed threads in general application use or in games that are WELL optimized to use all available threads/cores, then the 1600x might win out. See for yourself.

    https://www.techspot.com/review/1505-intel-core-8th-gen-vs-amd-ryzen/
    Reply to darkbreeze
  26. One week later:

    Black Friday approaches us. And yet I have lost hair over few things.
    So I started messing with the build again, and I came out with two builds that are kind of similar, but have differences such in processor, motherboard, and RAM. (And peripherals, but that's not the big issue.) One last comparison, I hope. The price tags are pretty similar, so I might screw around on the Skylake setup to make room for a 6GB 1060, since I don't really wanna go the RX 580 route with cryptomining and all that.

    Build 1:
    PCPartPicker part list/Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-7600K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($220.39 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($34.89 @ OutletPC)
    Thermal Compound: Arctic Silver - 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver 3.5g Thermal Paste ($4.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte - GA-B250-HD3 ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($55.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Patriot - Viper Elite 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($59.99)
    Memory: Patriot - Viper Elite 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($59.99)
    Storage: Western Digital - Green 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($58.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1060 3GB 3GB Windforce OC Video Card ($208.89 @ OutletPC)
    Case: Deepcool - EARLKASE RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - EVO Edition 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($65.98 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit (Purchased For $0.00)
    Wireless Network Adapter: Gigabyte - GC-WB867D-I PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter ($38.89 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: Asus - VP228H 21.5" 1920x1080 60Hz Monitor ($109.00 @ Best Buy)
    Keyboard: Redragon - K555 INDRAH RGB Wired Gaming Keyboard ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Corsair - M65 PRO RGB FPS Wired Optical Mouse ($44.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Sades - SA-902-B 7.1 Channel Headset ($26.99)
    Other: Steam ($200.00)
    Other: Overwatch ($50.00)
    Other: Extra wires ($20.00)
    Total: $1439.92
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-08 22:32 EST-0500



    Build 2:
    PCPartPicker part list/Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8600K 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($279.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($34.89 @ OutletPC)
    Thermal Compound: Arctic Silver - 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver 3.5g Thermal Paste ($4.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z370-A PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($109.89 @ OutletPC)
    Memory: Patriot - Viper Elite 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($59.99)
    Storage: Western Digital - Green 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($58.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1060 3GB 3GB Windforce OC Video Card ($208.89 @ OutletPC)
    Case: Deepcool - EARLKASE RGB ATX Mid Tower Case ($59.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - EVO Edition 620W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($65.98 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit (Purchased For $0.00)
    Wireless Network Adapter: Gigabyte - GC-WB867D-I PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter ($38.89 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: Asus - VP228H 21.5" 1920x1080 60Hz Monitor ($109.00 @ Best Buy)
    Keyboard: Redragon - ASURA K501 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($33.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Redragon - Mammoth Wired Laser Mouse ($26.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Sades - SA-902-B 7.1 Channel Headset ($26.99)
    Other: Steam ($200.00)
    Other: Overwatch ($50.00)
    Other: Extra wires ($20.00)
    Total: $1449.34
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-08 22:32 EST-0500


    Honestly, the only reason this is a debate for me is because I want to see what Intel has for CPU's in following generations, and I'd rather not get a new motherboard for it. But if Intel releases suck in the future, I would stick with the Skylake.
    Reply to tredalekeru
  27. Intel releases, at least over the last ten years, have never sucked, unless by sucked you're meaning in comparison to it's last generation prior to the one you are looking at. If you compare performance gains between platforms, every two years or so, regardless of tick tock, or tick tock tick, or tick tac toe, there are significant changes in some way shape or form. If it's not an increase in IPC, it's a die shrink that reduces power consumption. If neither of those are terribly significant, it's the addition of support for faster or newer technologies in the chipset on the new platform. Or simply the addition of more functional cores, as with Coffee lake.

    Every generation something happens that adds a benefit of some kind from the generation before. Naysayers will have you believe that some releases are merely marketing ploys, but I've not seen a new platform in recent memory that didn't offer something making it worth upgrading if you were at least two releases behind. The only REAL problem I see is the the newly adopted policy of insisting that new boards be necessary for each new generation rather than generally having two generation compatibility like in past years.

    So I don't forsee future Intel releases "sucking", but it's almost always the case that if you've recently upgraded in the last cycle or two it's uncommon for there to be a compelling reason to do so until the next time there is at least a die shrink to a smaller node.

    I also have real concerns about the choice of case. There is a reason why they don't provide images of the back side of the case with the panel off, and that's because they provide very little room for cable management or drive installation on the backside under the motherboard tray on most their case models. I've built about five machines for other people in the past using Deepcool cases and I've never been particularly happy with the quality of lack of features on any of the five cases. I've not done a build in THAT particular case, but looking over reviews on Newegg and Amazon (Which are usually not reliable if you want to know anything really usefull as far as whether it's ACTUALLY a good product or not, but is usually a good indicator of whether there are common problems) it seems that a good number of them have a common them of missing or damaged parts.

    Certainly that's a decision that's totally up to you, but to be honest I haven't seen much to be pleased about with any of the Deepcool products I've worked with in the past except for a few of their CPU coolers, and even then they worked a lot better if you replaced the fan they came with.

    Of course that's something that's entirely up to you. Your case, your build, your decision, but at or near that price range I think you'd be a hell of a lot happier with a case selection that I KNOW for a fact is a high quality product, with great features from companies that provide pretty terrific customer service in the event you should ever need it.

    The Fractal design Define S with window (Happens to be the exact case I use, and I paid about forty bucks more than this for it about a year ago)

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    Case: Fractal Design - Define S w/Window ATX Mid Tower Case ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $64.99
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-09 03:40 EST-0500

    OR

    Phanteks Eclipse P400 tempered glass

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    Case: Phanteks - ECLIPSE P400 TEMPERED GLASS ATX Mid Tower Case ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Total: $64.99
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-09 03:43 EST-0500


    Would be choices that I think you'd be a lot happier with in the long run, but that's just my opinion and I'm not the one who has to build in it or live with it, so just an opinion.

    I'll tell you right now you definitely don't want two kits with each having 2 x4gb to get 16GB of RAM. Maybe that's just a mistake, I don't know, but if you want 16GB of RAM then you want to get 2 x8GB, also a matched set. Also, the more RAM you add, as far as the number of modules, the more likely you are to encounter problems due to voltage issues. Four modules has twice the electrical demand on the controller and the chipset than two modules does, but even if you do go with four modules, you certainly want them to be all a matched set or you may encounter compatibility issues even if they are all identical part numbers. Matched sets have been verified to all work together in either dual or quad channel operation, depending on the platform.

    You never want to get 4 x4GB modules just to get to 16GB, not even if the cost is less than a 2 x8GB kit.

    You also have the Seasonic S12II 620 power supply, which is entirely different from the Seasonic G unit I had used before. The S12II platform is not compatible with the C6/C7 low power states used on Haswell and newer Intel CPU chipsets. It is a group regulated design and you will have problems with it unless you disable the low power states in the bios the first time you start it up and configure your bios settings. I can give you more information on that if you like, but bottom line is, it's an older platform, and while it's a pretty decent platform and will work if you disable the C6 and C7 states, it's better all around to just go with a unit that has DC to DC regulation and not have to worry about it.

    Other than those things, either build will be fine.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  28. PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-7600K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($220.39 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($34.89 @ OutletPC)
    Thermal Compound: Arctic Silver - 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver 3.5g Thermal Paste ($4.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z270-A PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($89.88 @ OutletPC)
    Memory: Patriot - Viper Elite 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($74.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital - Green 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($58.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Hitachi - Ultrastar 7K3000 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($68.83 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Sapphire - Radeon RX 580 4GB NITRO+ Video Card ($249.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT - S340 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($61.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.59 @ SuperBiiz)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit (Purchased For $0.00)
    Wireless Network Adapter: Gigabyte - GC-WB867D-I PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter ($38.89 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: AOC - G2460FQ 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor ($183.99 @ Newegg)
    Keyboard: Redragon - K552-R KUMARA Wired Gaming Keyboard ($34.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Corsair - Harpoon RGB Wired Optical Mouse ($24.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Sades - SA-902-B 7.1 Channel Headset ($26.99)
    Other: Steam ($200.00)
    Other: Overwatch ($50.00)
    Other: Extra wires ($20.00)
    Total: $1512.37
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-09 17:41 EST-0500


    I hope. The S340 had a lot of high reviews last time I checked, and it might be good for cable management. But all in all, I switched to an RX 580 and put in an overclocking motherboard(i think).

    And then there's this:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($193.44 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: ASRock - AB350M Pro4 Micro ATX AM4 Motherboard ($74.33 @ OutletPC)
    Memory: Patriot - Viper Elite 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($74.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 250GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($94.99 @ B&H)
    Storage: Hitachi - Ultrastar 7K3000 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($68.83 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Sapphire - Radeon RX 580 4GB NITRO+ Video Card ($249.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT - S340 (White) ATX Mid Tower Case ($61.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Power Supply: *SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.59 @ SuperBiiz)
    Wireless Network Adapter: Gigabyte - GC-WB867D-I PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter ($38.89 @ OutletPC)
    Monitor: Acer - GN246HL 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor ($187.49 @ B&H)
    Keyboard: Redragon - K552-R KUMARA Wired Gaming Keyboard ($34.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Corsair - Harpoon RGB Wired Optical Mouse ($24.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Sades - SA-902-B 7.1 Channel Headset ($26.99)
    Other: Steam ($200.00)
    Other: WIRES ($20.00)
    Other: Overwatch ($50.00)
    Total: $1469.50
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    *Lowest price parts chosen from parametric criteria
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-09 18:05 EST-0500
    Reply to tredalekeru
  29. No doubts. The 7600k squashes the Ryzen 5 1600, even when the Ryzen is overclocked to 3.9ghz.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/reviews/amd-ryzen-5-1600-cpu,5073-4.html
    Reply to darkbreeze
  30. Now I know this build I'm posting below is way out of my range. But I was thinking, with Black Friday and all that, could something like this be potentially in the $1400-1600 range?

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8600K 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($279.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: NZXT - Kraken X62 Rev 2 98.2 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($148.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Thermal Compound: Arctic Silver - 5 High-Density Polysynthetic Silver 3.5g Thermal Paste ($4.98 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Asus - ROG STRIX Z370-G GAMING (WI-FI AC) Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($176.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Memory: G.Skill - Trident Z RGB 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($194.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($148.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($78.88 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Video Card: Asus - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8GB ROG STRIX Video Card ($499.98 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: Phanteks - Enthoo Pro M Tempered Glass (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.59 @ SuperBiiz)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit (Purchased For $0.00)
    Monitor: Acer - GN246HL 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor ($187.49 @ B&H)
    Keyboard: Razer - Ornata Chroma Wired Gaming Keyboard ($87.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Razer - Mamba Tournament Edition Wired Laser Mouse ($67.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Razer - Kraken Headset ($45.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $2100.50
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-09 22:54 EST-0500
    Reply to tredalekeru
  31. I doubt it. Most of you see on sale during Black Friday are last years parts that they are trying to empty the inventory on.

    You could get that kind of performance though, again, sacrificing a few aesthetic bells and whistles, by doing something like this.


    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8600K 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($279.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: Corsair - H115i 104.7 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler ($109.99 @ Amazon)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte - Z370 AORUS GAMING WIFI (rev. 1.0) ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($129.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: SanDisk - Ultra II 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($88.49 @ Adorama)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($78.88 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8GB AMP Edition Video Card ($468.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: Phanteks - Enthoo Pro M Tempered Glass (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($109.98 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: Corsair - CXM 550W 80+ Bronze Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($34.99 @ Newegg)
    Operating System: Microsoft - Windows 10 Pro OEM 64-bit (Purchased For $0.00)
    Monitor: AOC - G2460VQ6 24.0" 1920x1080 75Hz Monitor ($129.99 @ B&H)
    Keyboard: Cooler Master - Devastator II Wired Gaming Keyboard w/Optical Mouse ($25.39 @ OutletPC)
    Headphones: Razer - Kraken Headset ($45.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1662.56
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-10 07:00 EST-0500
    Reply to darkbreeze
  32. Its a nice selection. But could this probably end up in the mid 1300's on Black Friday? Because if it can, I can stick with that. But hey, let's try the middle. I know a 8600K has much better performance, but with what you said about retailers trying to empty out on last gen stock, I put in the 7600K and also, since apparently all 1070 Ti's have the same stock clock, I may as well go with the cheapest one. I may end up docking it down to a 1070 since it's a little older and more likely to be on sale. The keyboards is surprisingly a Cherry MX Red for $50 dollars, which is nice. I have a sweet spot for that Mamba Tournament mouse though, with the RGB lighting and the adjustable DPI, and the fact that it's Razer, etc. I went back to 75hz for some reason. If prices are nice I'll do 144hz. Mainly I'll have around $1,600 to spend on Black Friday, and I want to set aside around $250 for games. Buy a few now and save the rest for the Steam Summer Sale. Either way, I think this is a middle ground from the time I started this thread around a month ago.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-7600K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($220.29 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($34.89 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z270-A PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($89.88 @ OutletPC)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($148.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8GB Mini Video Card ($449.99 @ B&H)
    Case: NZXT - S340 Elite (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.59 @ SuperBiiz)
    Wireless Network Adapter: Gigabyte - GC-WB867D-I PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter ($34.00 @ B&H)
    Monitor: AOC - G2260VWQ6 21.5" 1920x1080 75Hz Monitor ($119.99 @ Best Buy)
    Keyboard: Logitech - G610 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Razer - Mamba Tournament Edition Wired Laser Mouse ($67.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Sades - SA-902-B 7.1 Channel Headset ($26.99)
    Total: $1620.45
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-10 16:17 EST-0500
    Reply to tredalekeru
  33. You'll just have to wait and see I guess, but I doubt it. Chances are good that Coffee Lake i5 and i7 SKUs are going to actually be even more expensive than they are being advertised for now while they are out of stock, because even once they begin receiving stock it's going to coincide with the shopping season and are likely to be wiped off shelves rather quickly.

    Same with graphics cards especially since bitcoin seems to just keep going up and up in value.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  34. Well, if everything goes south, let's just call this my PC Build to survive the cryptomining apocalypse.
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-7600K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($220.29 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($28.90 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Motherboard: MSI - B250M PRO-VD Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($39.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - NT Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($69.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - NT Series 8GB (1 x 8GB) DDR4-2400 Memory ($69.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital - Green 120GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($58.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB AMP! Edition Video Card ($259.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT - S340 Elite (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.59 @ SuperBiiz)
    Wireless Network Adapter: Gigabyte - GC-WB867D-I PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter ($34.00 @ B&H)
    Case Fan: Noctua - NF-A14 PWM 82.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($21.95 @ Amazon)
    Case Fan: Noctua - NF-A14 PWM 82.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($21.95 @ Amazon)
    Monitor: AOC - G2260VWQ6 21.5" 1920x1080 75Hz Monitor ($119.99 @ Best Buy)
    Keyboard: Logitech - G610 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Logitech - G502 Wired Optical Mouse ($49.99 @ Best Buy)
    Headphones: Sades - SA-902-B 7.1 Channel Headset ($26.99)
    Other: Silverstone Tek 140mm Ultra Fine Fan Filter with Magnet Cooling FF143B (Black) ($7.16 @ Amazon)
    Other: Silverstone Tek 140mm Ultra Fine Fan Filter with Magnet Cooling FF143B (Black) ($7.16 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1304.89
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-10 16:46 EST-0500
    Reply to tredalekeru
  35. Nope. You have two separate 8GB memory modules again. You need a single kit with 2 x8GB in it, so they are matched and play well together. I explained that before. Believe me, plenty of people who have bought identical sticks of the same RAM and they would not play well together.

    Does it happen that way every time, no. Does it happen often enough to mention, absolutely.

    You also dropped down to a 120GB SSD from a 250GB SSD. 120GB is not going to leave much room for expansion of windows updates or installation of programs since a bare bones Windows 10 installation, which you forget to include in your build, will take up about 20GB before any updates or service packs. Factor in the fact that on a 120GB drive you really only have 111GB of usable capacity to begin with as HD manufacturers define 1GB as 1000MB, 1MB as 1000KB, and 1KB as 1000B. The rest of the world (except Apple) defines 1GB as 1024MB, 1MB as 1024KB, etc.

    So down to 111GB minus 20GB for the Windows installation leaves about 91GB. Windows hibernation creates images in the average of about 75% of RAM, so about another 12GB, leaving 79GB.

    Windows restore and all of the Windows updates that it will download and install take up maybe another 15GB, at least until you do a drive cleanup and make sure that it gets rid of the Windows.old folder after updating. That leaves 64GB.

    Windows also creates a recovery partition when it is installed, uses about 500GB. 63.5GB left.

    Since you'll be using an SSD, it's highly recommended that you overprovision the SSD, so that there is space reserved for wear leveling and TRIM operations to ensure the drive has enough good blocks to write to later in life once some blocks have begun to fail. Overprovisioning is recommended to be at least 15-20% of overall drive space, which in this case is 111GB, so we'll take another 22.2GB off for that.

    Now you have 41.3GB of free space left to install every program and game you're ever going to need to install, unless you install game files to another drive or create your whole steam folder elsewhere. 41GB isn't very much room when you consider applications can take that space up quick, not to mention future windows updates or application updates.

    Minimum recommended SSD or HDD size for the operating system drives, these days, is 240GB. You need a bigger SSD just like your previous builds and my builds had included.

    The S340 already comes with a full length front filter, so there is no need for those filters you added. Exhaust fans do not need filtration.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  36. PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-7600K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($220.29 @ OutletPC)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($28.90 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Motherboard: MSI - B250M PRO-VD Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($39.99 @ Newegg)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($148.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB AMP! Edition Video Card ($259.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT - S340 Elite (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.59 @ SuperBiiz)
    Wireless Network Adapter: Gigabyte - GC-WB867D-I PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter ($34.00 @ B&H)
    Case Fan: Noctua - NF-A14 PWM 82.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($21.95 @ Amazon)
    Case Fan: Noctua - NF-A14 PWM 82.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($21.95 @ Amazon)
    Monitor: AOC - G2260VWQ6 21.5" 1920x1080 75Hz Monitor ($119.99 @ Best Buy)
    Keyboard: Logitech - G610 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Logitech - G502 Wired Optical Mouse ($49.99 @ Best Buy)
    Headphones: Sades - SA-902-B 7.1 Channel Headset ($26.99)
    Total: $1400.47
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-10 17:53 EST-0500

    Made the edits. Just realize this is my last ditch build. My first choice is going to be the 1070 Ti build above, but if prices are still inflated, I'm building this one above.
    Reply to tredalekeru
  37. Motherboard is pretty low quality for the rest of the build, and the B250M micro-ATX motherboard is going to be extremely tiny in that mid tower case, plus you're losing a lot of functionality that a full size ATX Z270 motherboard would offer, but other than that it looks pretty solid.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  38. OK, so I've took 3 similar build ranging in price. Depending on Black Friday this year, and the amount of money I have by then, I'll pick from one of these.

    Build 1: Very Excessive
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-8600K 3.6GHz 6-Core Processor ($279.89 @ B&H)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($28.90 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Motherboard: *Gigabyte - Z370 HD3 (rev. 1.0) ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($101.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: *G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: *SanDisk - SSD PLUS 480GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($137.99 @ Amazon)
    Storage: *Hitachi - Deskstar 3TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ Amazon)
    Video Card: *Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8GB Mini Video Card ($448.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: NZXT - S340 Elite (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.59 @ SuperBiiz)
    Wireless Network Adapter: Gigabyte - GC-WB867D-I PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter ($34.00 @ B&H)
    Case Fan: Noctua - NF-A14 PWM 82.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($21.40 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Case Fan: Noctua - NF-A14 PWM 82.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($21.40 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Monitor: AOC - AG241QX 23.8" 2560x1440 144Hz Monitor ($299.99 @ Newegg)
    Keyboard: Logitech - G610 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Razer - Mamba Tournament Edition Wired Laser Mouse ($67.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Sades - SA-902-B 7.1 Channel Headset ($26.99)
    Total: $1897.07
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    *Lowest price parts chosen from parametric criteria
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-11 12:53 EST-0500

    Build 2: A Little More Conservative:
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-7600K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($195.00 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($28.90 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z270-A PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($89.88 @ OutletPC)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($148.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 8GB Mini Video Card ($448.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Case: NZXT - S340 Elite (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.59 @ SuperBiiz)
    Wireless Network Adapter: Gigabyte - GC-WB867D-I PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter ($34.00 @ B&H)
    Case Fan: Noctua - NF-A14 PWM 82.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($21.40 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Case Fan: Noctua - NF-A14 PWM 82.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($21.40 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Monitor: Acer - GN246HL 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor ($187.49 @ B&H)
    Keyboard: Logitech - G610 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Razer - Mamba Tournament Edition Wired Laser Mouse ($67.99 @ Amazon)
    Headphones: Sades - SA-902-B 7.1 Channel Headset ($26.99)
    Total: $1698.47
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-11 12:53 EST-0500

    Build 3: Last Resort
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Core i5-7600K 3.8GHz Quad-Core Processor ($195.00 @ Amazon)
    CPU Cooler: CRYORIG - H7 49.0 CFM CPU Cooler ($28.90 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Motherboard: MSI - Z270-A PRO ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($89.88 @ OutletPC)
    Memory: G.Skill - Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory ($159.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Samsung - 850 EVO-Series 500GB 2.5" Solid State Drive ($148.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Seagate - Barracuda 2TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($64.99 @ Newegg)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1060 6GB 6GB AMP! Edition Video Card ($259.99 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT - S340 Elite (Black/Red) ATX Mid Tower Case ($74.99 @ Newegg)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - G 550W 80+ Gold Certified Semi-Modular ATX Power Supply ($67.59 @ SuperBiiz)
    Wireless Network Adapter: Gigabyte - GC-WB867D-I PCI-Express x1 802.11a/b/g/n/ac Wi-Fi Adapter ($34.00 @ B&H)
    Case Fan: Noctua - NF-A14 PWM 82.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($21.40 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Case Fan: Noctua - NF-A14 PWM 82.5 CFM 140mm Fan ($21.40 @ Newegg Marketplace)
    Monitor: AOC - G2260VWQ6 21.5" 1920x1080 75Hz Monitor ($119.99 @ Best Buy)
    Keyboard: Logitech - G610 Wired Gaming Keyboard ($59.99 @ Amazon)
    Mouse: Logitech - G502 Wired Optical Mouse ($44.99 @ Best Buy)
    Headphones: Sades - SA-902-B 7.1 Channel Headset ($26.99)
    Total: $1418.97
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-11-11 12:54 EST-0500

    So basically, I'll most likely have somewhere between $1,500 and $1,700 on Black Friday, but I want to save about $250-300 for games and maybe another $15 for wires if they're not included. So basically, I'm looking for between a $1,300-$1,400 dollar build on Black Friday, which I'm expecting will be about $1,600-$1,700 now. The first build I listed is a little excessive because if by some miracle I do build it, it's gonna be for 1440p gaming, or even maybe 4K with a few upgrades. I realize I'm going to probably switch to 60hz for more demanding games, but that's not a huge problem, because it'll still be beautiful. I also will probably have to overclock the GPU, because all the reviews say a 1080 is good for 4K and a beast at 1440p. But most likely, I'm expecting to do the second build with the 7600K and the 1070 Ti. Either way, this will last for a long time no matter what I build. Or I could get depressed on Black Friday and just save the rest of the money to get the 1440p setup. Doesn't matter a ton. Plus if there's some extra money, I'll optimize it for Hue+ :)
    Another Option: I found a prebuilt that's actually pretty similar, with a 120GB SSD and a 1TB hard drive. It won't be too hard to upgrade, but this is actually really similar to what I was doing before. If prices are still really inflated, I might go with this. Especially if the 8600K goes out of stock again, or the 1070 Ti.
    https://jet.com/product/CyberpowerPC-Gamer-Xtreme-with-Intel-i5-8600K-36GHz-Gaming-Computer-Black-GXi110/2effc92041aa4801b4014416232739da
    Reply to tredalekeru
  39. Just go with what your gut tells you. I think I've given you more than enough information for you to be able to make a decision on your own. If in doubt, look back over this thread and just make sure you are not overlooking anything that I've mentioned as being a problem.

    I would avoid all prebuilt systems. They generally either skimp on quality or are grossly overpriced compared to what you'd get if you built it yourself. They have to make money on the build, you don't, so they can't build you a comparable system for the same price you can. Plus, they mostly all suck.

    I don't see any glaring issues with any of those builds.
    Reply to darkbreeze
  40. Wel, I'll build one of them. Thanks for the help. I'll try to send pics once I build, especially if I use the hue+

    :D thanks for everything
    Reply to tredalekeru
  41. For sure. Once you get it built be sure to post pictures to our members build gallery.

    http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/310222-31-hardware-member-system-gallery/page-86
    Reply to darkbreeze
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