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Partition Confusion, need advice.

https://imgur.com/a/jIhZT

I have no idea what i have done. The unallocated memory on the far left seems to be stuck there and i cant expand my C drive. My disk drive has been causing many problems for me and i attempted to fix it but i seem to have made it worse. Any input is appreciated!
Reply to bTurtel
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More about partition confusion advice
  1. You can't expand C: partition, because there is no free space next to it. B: partition is in the way.
    If you want to expand C: , then you have to delete B: first.

    BTW - what are trying to accomplish there?
    Reply to SkyNetRising
  2. Best answer
    Windows disk management only allows you to add that disk space to the partition in front of it, say for example the 97.66GB at the end, you can only add that to your B: partition, it cannot be added to C: via Windows Disk Management (you need to use Linux tools like GParted to do so). The 451MB of space can only be made into a new partition and its not worth going thru the trouble of trying to reclaim 450MB.
    Reply to Snipergod87
  3. Your "B" partition of 498+ GB is virtually empty of data. So you can delete that partition which will then become "unallocated" disk-space. Then it will be a simple operation to utilize Disk Management to extend your current "C" (boot) partition to encompass all (or whatever portion you desire) of ALL the unallocated disk-space following the C partition.
    Reply to ArtPog
  4. My school firewall prevents imgur -- so I cannot see it.
    What that tiny <500MB B-partition allocated before working with the partitions? If earlier allocated, did it appear to be empty? It might not have been empty, scuttlebutt elsewhere indicates certain system partition contents, folders & files, are not "see-able" by Windows Explorer. Other utilities can see such though. An example: my Windows 7's System Reserved is not read by explorer, does not carry a drive letter, and has folder and file content.
    I like to learn more about your Windows' boot setup.
    Reply to RolandJS
  5. RolandJS said:
    My school firewall prevents imgur -- so I cannot see it.
    What that tiny <500MB B-partition allocated before working with the partitions? If earlier allocated, did it appear to be empty? It might not have been empty, scuttlebutt elsewhere indicates certain system partition contents, folders & files, are not "see-able" by Windows Explorer. Other utilities can see such though. An example: my Windows 7's System Reserved is not read by explorer, does not carry a drive letter, and has folder and file content.
    I like to learn more about your Windows' boot setup.


    Roland:
    it's best you do not comment on the post unless you're able to view the screenshot of Disk Management that the OP wisely submitted. The B partition is NOT a SR partition of MB; rather it's a "normal" partition of nearly 500 GIGABYTES.
    Reply to ArtPog
  6. In addition to the above partition recommendations, which I will not add to so as not to muddy the waters...

    Whatever partitioning scheme you end up with, don't use "B" as a drive letter for it.
    Yes it works, but Windows reserves A and B for legacy drives. Floppies from last century.
    As such, it will not index data under those drive letters.
    Reply to USAFRet
  7. RolandJS said:
    My school firewall prevents imgur.../quotemsg]
    Roland: it's best you do not comment on the post unless you're able to view the screenshot of Disk Management that the OP wisely submitted. The B partition is NOT a SR partition of MB; rather it's a "normal" partition of nearly 500 GIGABYTES.
    Thanks for the heads-up ArtPog, I was distracted during the school day and missed the reality of the situation -- I'll listen in and learn!
    Reply to RolandJS
  8. It's your system and you can do what you want with it. But it seems to me incredible that you would not simply delete the B: partition (that is effectively devoid of data) which would result in 498.92 GB of unallocated disk-space. Together with the remaining 97.66 GB of unallocated disk-space, that would yield a total of some 596+ GB of unallocated disk-space. Then it would be a simple matter of using Disk Management to extend the boot (C:) partition to encompass that 596+ GB of disk-space. Doesn't that make sense to you?
    Reply to ArtPog
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