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First Pc Build. Are all my parts compatible

Hello,

Im building my own pc for the first time and I would like to get verification all parts I have picked go together.

NZXT S340 Elite case

Corsair Vengeance RGB 16GB - Kit de memoria entusiasta (16 GB, (2 x 8 GB), DDR4, 3200 MHz, C16 XMP 2, iluminación RGB LED), negro (CMR16GX4M2C3200C16)

NZXT Kraken x62 cooler

STRIX Z270F GAMING Intel Z270 LGA1151 ATX

i7 7700K

1080gtx ti (ill choose the one i get when I place the order due changing prices and availability)

Samsung 960 EVO NVMe M.2 250GB

Samsung 850 EVO 500gb SSD

Corsair RM650x PSU

WD 2tb Blue

Also what is the forum opinion should I wait for the 8700k to get more stock or just settle for the 7700k. I would buy it if I could get one soon-ish. But I guess there is no guarantees there will be enough stock for them during end of 2017...

Also is some of the ryzen CPUs an option. My setup is mainly for games 1440p 144hz.

I am also taking on suggestions for improvements on the other parts if you guys have any good ideas.

Thank you for your time and help.
Reply to ralexpalex
22 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about build parts compatible
  1. depends on pricing.

    the Corsair RMx is usually a good deal pricier than a Bitfenix Whisper M, a Seasonic Focus or an EVGA G3

    depending on availability (and pricing) an 8700k+Z370 board woud be a nice combo, not necessary though
    Reply to Isokolon
  2. you could definitely go Ryzen. It would take better advantage of that 3200mhz RAM you got there. It would mean switching to an X370 or B350 chipset on the AM4 platform.

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813157761 <--- incredible value.
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16813128999 <--- decent value, great quality.


    Also, I wouldnt get any smaller than 650w PSU. I just calculated ur build, with 3 120mm case fans youre looking at 496w from what i came up with. 650w doesnt leave you a lot of room for expandability in the future. If it were me, id drop it from a GOLD certified to a BRONZE or SILVER and see what 700 or 750w PSU you could get for less than $100.
    Reply to Franklin_4
  3. https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139051

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438025


    Heres two good ones. With current rebates they are $50, and $55 respectively. BRONZE rating is plenty in my eyes...
    Reply to Franklin_4
  4. Franklin_4 said:

    you could definitely go Ryzen. It would take better advantage of that 3200mhz RAM you got there. It would mean switching to an X370 or B350 chipset on the AM4 platform.

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16... <--- incredible value.
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16... <--- decent value, great quality.


    Also, I wouldnt get any smaller than 650w PSU. I just calculated ur build, with 3 120mm case fans youre looking at 496w from what i came up with. 650w doesnt leave you a lot of room for expandability in the future. If it were me, id drop it from a GOLD certified to a BRONZE or SILVER and see what 700 or 750w PSU you could get for less than $100.

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139051
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438025


    Heres two good ones. With current rebates they are $50, and $55 respectively. BRONZE rating is plenty in my eyes...


    1) a Ryzen CPU for a 144 Hz screen? I love Ryzen but for 144Hz screens you want an Intel CPU. Ryzen manages good stable minimum fps, but they don't reach high fps. even Intel has some problems getting 144Hz at some games, Ryzen gets less.
    2) how does Ryzen take better advantage of 3200MHz RAM? only difference is if anything, you lose performance with slower RAM on Ryzen. it just makes a difference as the whole memory controller works differently.
    3) 3 case fans are around 2W of power draw. odd thing to mention. as for expandability: it's a top of the line card and top of the line CPU. adding HDDs, SSDs, RAMs, fans is next to nothing in power draw. Gaming loads will typically be around or below 400W. but yeah, I agree, 550W would be cutting it close.
    4a) the EVGA B1 is not a good PSU
    4b) while the Corsair CX750M (2015) is a decent budget unit, it's not particularly great. running an i7 and a 1080Ti on it is almost a shame. it uses some good caps on the secondary stage but only some. soldering is good but not perfect. ripple is better than expected but far from a decent unit. it's a good PSU for a 800$ system, not a system with a 800$ video card.
    5) what good would 750W do? doesn't allow you to run a 2nd GPU, but is way too much for anything you could add or overclock
    Reply to Isokolon
  5. Best answer
    A good top end build.
    From a performance point of view, I see benchmarks showing I7-7700K and I7-8700K performing the same in games.
    You could go either.
    If you were to be heavy into multitasking or editing, then it might pay to wait for the 8700K and the additional threads it provides.
    With a GTX1080ti, I see little value in extra ryzen threads at the expense of lower single thread performance.
    On your ssd setup, I would suggest that a single 1tb 960 nvme drive would perform better and give you more capacity at a small increase in cost.
    You could consider deferring on the hard drive until you actually need the space.
    If you are storing large data files, that is what the hdd is best suited for.

    Your case is an excellent cooling case.
    I would buy two 140mm front intake fans.
    That will give you all the cooling air you need and be quieter than 120mm fans.

    You have no need for a aio cooler.
    Spend your money elsewhere.
    You have room for a 160mm tower type air cooler.
    The Noctua NH-D15s at half the price will cool equally well and be quieter.
    Here is the noctua tdp chart:
    http://noctua.at/en/tdp-guide
    If the beige color of the noctua fans offends you, Phanteks has equally good coolers in different colors.
    My canned rant on liquid cooling:
    ------------------------start of rant-------------------
    You buy a liquid cooler to be able to extract an extra multiplier or two out of your OC.
    How much do you really need?
    I do not much like all in one liquid coolers when a good air cooler like a Noctua or phanteks can do the job just as well.
    A liquid cooler will be expensive, noisy, less reliable, and will not cool any better
    in a well ventilated case.
    Liquid cooling is really air cooling, it just puts the heat exchange in a different place.
    The orientation of the radiator will cause a problem.
    If you orient it to take in cool air from the outside, you will cool the cpu better, but the hot air then circulates inside the case heating up the graphics card and motherboard.
    If you orient it to exhaust(which I think is better) , then your cpu cooling will be less effective because it uses pre heated case air.
    And... I have read too many tales of woe when a liquid cooler leaks.
    google "H100 leak"
    I would support an AIO cooler only in a space restricted case.
    -----------------------end of rant--------------------------

    Your pc will be quieter, more reliable, and will be cooled equally well with a decent air cooler.
    Reply to geofelt
  6. Isokolon said:
    Franklin_4 said:

    you could definitely go Ryzen. It would take better advantage of that 3200mhz RAM you got there. It would mean switching to an X370 or B350 chipset on the AM4 platform.

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16... <--- incredible value.
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16... <--- decent value, great quality.


    Also, I wouldnt get any smaller than 650w PSU. I just calculated ur build, with 3 120mm case fans youre looking at 496w from what i came up with. 650w doesnt leave you a lot of room for expandability in the future. If it were me, id drop it from a GOLD certified to a BRONZE or SILVER and see what 700 or 750w PSU you could get for less than $100.

    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817139051
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817438025


    Heres two good ones. With current rebates they are $50, and $55 respectively. BRONZE rating is plenty in my eyes...


    1) a Ryzen CPU for a 144 Hz screen? I love Ryzen but for 144Hz screens you want an Intel CPU. Ryzen manages good stable minimum fps, but they don't reach high fps. even Intel has some problems getting 144Hz at some games, Ryzen gets less.
    2) how does Ryzen take better advantage of 3200MHz RAM? only difference is if anything, you lose performance with slower RAM on Ryzen. it just makes a difference as the whole memory controller works differently.
    3) 3 case fans are around 2W of power draw. odd thing to mention. as for expandability: it's a top of the line card and top of the line CPU. adding HDDs, SSDs, RAMs, fans is next to nothing in power draw. Gaming loads will typically be around or below 400W. but yeah, I agree, 550W would be cutting it close.
    4a) the EVGA B1 is not a good PSU
    4b) while the Corsair CX750M (2015) is a decent budget unit, it's not particularly great. running an i7 and a 1080Ti on it is almost a shame. it uses some good caps on the secondary stage but only some. soldering is good but not perfect. ripple is better than expected but far from a decent unit. it's a good PSU for a 800$ system, not a system with a 800$ video card.
    5) what good would 750W do? doesn't allow you to run a 2nd GPU, but is way too much for anything you could add or overclock



    jeez a lot to address here...

    1. i wasnt aware of ryzen performance decline on 144hz screens.
    2. higher mhz needed by ryzen for performance. idk about the 8700k but the 770k has nearly the same performance at 2400 as it does at 3200 from benchmarks ive seen.
    3. hahahah "funny thing to mention" i honestly didnt know what the power consumption was of a few fans, but the tool i was using to calculate power asked for a few things he didnt mention so i just took the liberty of "guessing/standarizing" his build a little bit.
    4a & b & 5... LOTS of psu snobs here at tomshardware, excuse my brutal honesty...TANGENT: i havent had any of my 3 PSUs die on me, so i kind of blame "User Error" on all these system burn outs that people referrence. STOP OCing like a fkn maniac people. lets be real,it doesnt really do that much.....end tangent.
    Bronze Cert should always be enough if you do your math right. 82% efficiency at 100% of power. 496W is 66.1% of 750. Its about 71% of 700w, and 71% is starting to get a little close to the 82% mark for me to be comfortable with any OC'ing/future upgrades. I honestly believe +95% of PSUs will work perfectly fine for +95% of users as long as your base build uses about 2/3 of your max PSU ability. Again, i understand efficiency and reliability are two different things, but companies make good products because they want to keep making sales. of course they skimp here and there to reduce costs, but not without extensive testing on their new products. it doesnt behoove companies to put crap products out there. I have had a Corsair CX600 for a couple years, and everyone said was utter garbage. Hasnt had a hiccup for me. Its bronze rated and i dont think ive ever even hit the 400w mark on a 600w PSU so im well within my personal PSU rule of thumb.
    Reply to Franklin_4
  7. Big fan of ditching 1 SSD for a bigger evo960. Also big fan of dropping the HDD. If you need a lot of storage, go for it! Personally i dont need that much storage (my new build is gonna have a 250gb evo960 and a 250 2.5") and if i ever need more storage i'll opt for a fancy lookin external drive.

    Also a big fan of your stance on cooling. Especially the h20 thing...unless you have a reservoir and sizable volume of coolant, the closed-loop will get up to temp fairly quick...even with such an amazing R-Value....and once your coolant is up to temp its probably only netting you like 4-6 degrees Celcius better than your stock cooler would have (maybe better, idk) at which point a passive cooler with similar results looks wayyyyy more appealing to me.

    geofelt said:
    A good top end build.
    From a performance point of view, I see benchmarks showing I7-7700K and I7-8700K performing the same in games.
    You could go either.
    If you were to be heavy into multitasking or editing, then it might pay to wait for the 8700K and the additional threads it provides.
    With a GTX1080ti, I see little value in extra ryzen threads at the expense of lower single thread performance.
    On your ssd setup, I would suggest that a single 1tb 960 nvme drive would perform better and give you more capacity at a small increase in cost.
    You could consider deferring on the hard drive until you actually need the space.
    If you are storing large data files, that is what the hdd is best suited for.

    Your case is an excellent cooling case.
    I would buy two 140mm front intake fans.
    That will give you all the cooling air you need and be quieter than 120mm fans.

    You have no need for a aio cooler.
    Spend your money elsewhere.
    You have room for a 160mm tower type air cooler.
    The Noctua NH-D15s at half the price will cool equally well and be quieter.
    Here is the noctua tdp chart:
    http://noctua.at/en/tdp-guide
    If the beige color of the noctua fans offends you, Phanteks has equally good coolers in different colors.
    My canned rant on liquid cooling:
    ------------------------start of rant-------------------
    You buy a liquid cooler to be able to extract an extra multiplier or two out of your OC.
    How much do you really need?
    I do not much like all in one liquid coolers when a good air cooler like a Noctua or phanteks can do the job just as well.
    A liquid cooler will be expensive, noisy, less reliable, and will not cool any better
    in a well ventilated case.
    Liquid cooling is really air cooling, it just puts the heat exchange in a different place.
    The orientation of the radiator will cause a problem.
    If you orient it to take in cool air from the outside, you will cool the cpu better, but the hot air then circulates inside the case heating up the graphics card and motherboard.
    If you orient it to exhaust(which I think is better) , then your cpu cooling will be less effective because it uses pre heated case air.
    And... I have read too many tales of woe when a liquid cooler leaks.
    google "H100 leak"
    I would support an AIO cooler only in a space restricted case.
    -----------------------end of rant--------------------------

    Your pc will be quieter, more reliable, and will be cooled equally well with a decent air cooler.

    Reply to Franklin_4
  8. For sizing a psu, I use this chart:
    http://www.realhardtechx.com/index_archivos/Page362.htm
    The size needed is primarily determined by the graphics configuration.
    In the case of a GTX1080ti, 600w should be sufficient.

    I have no problem overprovisioning a PSU a bit. Say 20%.
    It will run cooler, quieter, and more efficiently in the middle third of it's range.
    A PSU will only use the wattage demanded of it, regardless of it's max capability.

    As to quality, there are several lists of quality tiers.
    Here is one:http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/id-2547993/psu-tier-list.html
    Clearly avoid the cheap units which do not have sufficient protective circuitry and can damage parts if it should fail under load.
    I find that it costs little more to buy a tier 1 or 2 unit.
    Seasonic seems to be always good.
    Gold or better efficiency is ok if you value quiet. Their fans will probably never spin at all.
    Overprovisioning is an alternate way to reduce psu noise.

    Modular is another popular option.
    But, you are going to use most of the leads anyway.
    In a full sized case, there is always room to tuck unused leads out of the airflow stream.
    Reply to geofelt
  9. Thank you all for the suggestions.

    You have me convinced that I should opt for the air cooling instead. I just really liked the aesthetics of the Kraken :<
    Does the Phantek TC14PE fit in the case(is it any good)?
    And would 2x Phantek f140MP be good for the front case fans? (is there much of a difference between the different case fans that phantek has?)

    As for the memory I would like a separate drive for the OS and atleast here in Spain the 1tb evo is alot more expensive. I could almost buy for same price 2x500gb. So would you guys prefer 250gb for the OS and 500gb for a second M.2 or just go with a normal SSD for the 500gb (I also would like to have one SSD drive just for the visuals in the case).

    I found a 750w version of the rmx for the same price so I guess that would be a good quality pick?
    Reply to ralexpalex
  10. Quote:
    jeez a lot to address here...

    1. i wasnt aware of ryzen performance decline on 144hz screens.
    2. higher mhz needed by ryzen for performance. idk about the 8700k but the 770k has nearly the same performance at 2400 as it does at 3200 from benchmarks ive seen.
    3. hahahah "funny thing to mention" i honestly didnt know what the power consumption was of a few fans, but the tool i was using to calculate power asked for a few things he didnt mention so i just took the liberty of "guessing/standarizing" his build a little bit.
    4a & b & 5... LOTS of psu snobs here at tomshardware, excuse my brutal honesty...TANGENT: i havent had any of my 3 PSUs die on me, so i kind of blame "User Error" on all these system burn outs that people referrence. STOP OCing like a fkn maniac people. lets be real,it doesnt really do that much.....end tangent.
    Bronze Cert should always be enough if you do your math right. 82% efficiency at 100% of power. 496W is 66.1% of 750. Its about 71% of 700w, and 71% is starting to get a little close to the 82% mark for me to be comfortable with any OC'ing/future upgrades. I honestly believe +95% of PSUs will work perfectly fine for +95% of users as long as your base build uses about 2/3 of your max PSU ability. Again, i understand efficiency and reliability are two different things, but companies make good products because they want to keep making sales. of course they skimp here and there to reduce costs, but not without extensive testing on their new products. it doesnt behoove companies to put crap products out there. I have had a Corsair CX600 for a couple years, and everyone said was utter garbage. Hasnt had a hiccup for me. Its bronze rated and i dont think ive ever even hit the 400w mark on a 600w PSU so im well within my personal PSU rule of thumb.


    A lot to address indeed.

    1) there's no 'decline'. Ryzen has never been up to speed for 144Hz screens. It still is a tad slower than Intel's lineup due to the weaker IPC & clock speeds. It's like with a freight train: if you put 2-3 locomotives in traction they can carry more (as Ryzen can with it's numerous cores) but the train won't be any faster. Most games, correction, all games, still require a high single core performance. For a sub 100Hz screen Ryzen is perfectly fine and definitely the way to go. But with a 144Hz screen (and the fastest GPU on the market) Intel is the better choice as it can actually deliver 144 FPS.

    2) yes, Ryzen profits off faster RAM. However not because of the RAM but the general architecture. With Intel's core architecture the memory controller is separated from other parts and controllers (or at least that's the best I can do to explain in English). Other north-bridge duties are handled separately.
    Ryzen has a different architecture. Essentially the whole north-bridge, PCIe traffic alongside the memory communicates over something AMD calls infinite fabric. This infinite fabric however uses the frequency of the memory controller. So faster RAM means faster communication over the infinite fabric and that's what's making the whole system faster. RAM doesn't actually do much, just like with Intel.

    4) good for you. However I've seen enough people who's Corsair CX suddenly stopped working, went out with a bang or were just causing issues.
    As for PSU snobs: a friend of mine decided to buy a new gaming computer around 2.5 years ago. I told him to tell me when he does so I would build one for him so he gets the best for his money. He didn't listen and went some Thermaltake prebuild with a locked i7 & a GTX960? 970? something like that. After 6-7 months he started having random system hangs and sometimes a bluescreen. Memtest was okay. Happened on the iGPU as well. I lend him my old XFX PSU when I built a new computer (before shipping my old one to my mum) to try it instead of his mediocre Thermaltake, which would be around the same quality as a Corsair CX or EVGA B1. Didn't have a single issue for the week. Not only is his system not overclockable, he wouldn't have a clue on how to do it.
    And yes, a Corsair CX is mostly a stable unit for 18-24months, sometimes they run 6 years without issues. but many other users aren't as fortunate. And I've seen enough threads on this very boards about issues or PSU failures with mediocre units like that after 2-3 years.
    So why not pay 20 lousy bucks extra for a unit that comes with 5, 7, 10 years warranty?
    Why paying the same money for a mediocre 750W unit not to stress it when I can a decent 550-650W unit for the same money?

    Also what are you on about efficiency? You don't need any math there. A Corsair CX550M can deliver 45.8A @12V, resulting in 549.6W. it might draw 660W from the grid when doing so but that's irrelevant. Efficiency just shows how much power is wasted until the rated output of the unit. 550W is the rated output, not the input. If the PSU is rated for 550W it will deliver 550W under max load regardless of the efficiency.

    I agree however that efficiency doesn't really matter for a residential grade gaming computer --- however there is a bunch of mediocre and straight bad bronze certified units while fewer of them with gold certificate and none that I know of in the categories above (yet). As those efficiency levels are harder to achieve it's usually not considered for budget PSUs so they don't use budget parts in there. There's no direct correlation between efficiency and quality of course but there's a reason Seasonic hasn't released any bronze rated PSUs in the last couple of years. The most important thing is that the build quality is good, meaning
    - good soldering
    - all the necessary safeguards present and strong enough to protect the system
    - high quality caps
    - redundant caps
    - proper sized choke
    - modern design (f.e. DC-DC converters, focus on 12V output, rail design that tackles the needs of a modern gaming system)
    - usage of a doubleball or hydro-dynamic bearing, maybe a rifle bearing fan instead of a simple sleeve bearing fan
    Reply to Isokolon
  11. ralexpalex said:
    Thank you all for the suggestions.

    You have me convinced that I should opt for the air cooling instead. I just really liked the aesthetics of the Kraken :<
    Does the Phantek TC14PE fit in the case(is it any good)?
    And would 2x Phantek f140MP be good for the front case fans? (is there much of a difference between the different case fans that phantek has?)

    As for the memory I would like a separate drive for the OS and atleast here in Spain the 1tb evo is alot more expensive. I could almost buy for same price 2x500gb. So would you guys prefer 250gb for the OS and 500gb for a second M.2 or just go with a normal SSD for the 500gb (I also would like to have one SSD drive just for the visuals in the case).

    I found a 750w version of the rmx for the same price so I guess that would be a good quality pick?


    the MP-fans are mostly made for coolers or radiators. they don't push as much air and are louder than the other Phanteks fans, but they have a higher static pressure.
    I'd go for the XP or SP by Phanteks (alternative, depending on the pricing in Spain, consider Bequiet Silent Wings, or Cougar fans)
    if it's the same price, go for it. otherwise 750W will serve little to no benefit to a 650W PSU for your system.
    Reply to Isokolon
  12. thank you for the insight and POVs @iskolon. there is a LOT about hardware i need to learn.
    Reply to Franklin_4
  13. how is the rosewill PHOTON 550 in terms of quality, @iskolon?
    Reply to Franklin_4
  14. Franklin_4 said:
    how is the rosewill PHOTON 550 in terms of quality, @iskolon?

    jonnyguru is one of the most respected psu reviewers.
    The 750w version got just so so reviews.
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story6&reid=405
    And... 550w may not be enough.

    By comparison the Seasonic 550w focus got near perfect 9.8
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story6&reid=529
    Spend $90 for the 650w version and get a 10 year warranty:
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151186
    Reply to geofelt
  15. Updated part list

    NZXT S340 Elite case

    Corsair Vengeance RGB 16GB - Kit de memoria entusiasta (16 GB, (2 x 8 GB), DDR4, 3200 MHz, C16 XMP 2, iluminación RGB LED), negro (CMR16GX4M2C3200C16)

    Phantek TC14PE CPU Cooler

    Bequiet Silent Wings 3 Case coolers 2x

    STRIX Z270F GAMING Intel Z270 LGA1151 ATX

    i7 7700K

    1080gtx ti (ill choose the one i get when I place the order due changing prices and availability)

    Samsung 960 EVO NVMe M.2 250GB

    Samsung 850 EVO 500gb SSD

    Corsair RM750x PSU

    WD 2tb Blue

    Tomorrow I will order all the parts if this seems satisfactory.
    Reply to ralexpalex
  16. geofelt said:
    Franklin_4 said:
    how is the rosewill PHOTON 550 in terms of quality, @iskolon?

    jonnyguru is one of the most respected psu reviewers.
    The 750w version got just so so reviews.
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story6&reid=405
    And... 550w may not be enough.

    By comparison the Seasonic 550w focus got near perfect 9.8
    http://www.jonnyguru.com/modules.php?name=NDReviews&op=Story6&reid=529
    Spend $90 for the 650w version and get a 10 year warranty:
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=N82E16817151186




    thanks but 90-100$ just seems like a lot of dough when my mobo was only 75$. ill stick to my sub $50 budget bronze rated for now i guess...
    Reply to Franklin_4
  17. TC14PE is 171mm tall, too tall for your case which permits 161mm.
    The very best that will fit is the noctua NH-D15s.
    coolers with 120mm fans will come very close.
    Phanteks PH-TC12DX, noctua NH-U12s, scythe kotetsu is a bargain at $35.
    https://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.aspx?Item=13C-0004-00005
    Here is a review:
    http://www.silentpcreview.com/article1391-page1.html
    Reply to geofelt
  18. why is everone linking newegg when OP is from Spain?

    Scythe (FUMA, Mugen, Kotetsu), Cryorig (H5, maybe H7) & Thermalright (True Spirit / Macho) usually got the best pricing
    Noctua is a bit more expensive generally (but top notch!)
    Reply to Isokolon
  19. Isokolon said:
    why is everone linking newegg when OP is from Spain?

    Scythe (FUMA, Mugen, Kotetsu), Cryorig (H5, maybe H7) & Thermalright (True Spirit / Macho) usually got the best pricing
    Noctua is a bit more expensive generally (but top notch!)


    I link to newegg because they consistently have the best descriptions.
    In this particular case, they correctly say how tall the alternative coolers are.
    One other consideration for very large coolers is clearance.
    They often will impact ram with tall heat spreaders.
    Or... some are so wide that they impact a graphics card in the first pcie slot.
    The redesigned s variants of the noctua coolers, NH-D15s, are offset a bit to allow such clearance.
    Reply to geofelt
  20. Im between two choices the Phanteks TC12DX or Noctua NH-D15s which is quite pricey compared. Also the coulour isnt the nicest either.
    Would the Phantek be ok performance wise and does it have enough clearance around it considering other parts.

    And the newegg links are good. I just live in Spain I dont speak the language so I still have to google for descriptions of the parts ;)
    Reply to ralexpalex
  21. Thank you all for your help. Everything is now being ordered and the painfull wait begins.
    Also got a small snafoo of getting my Amazon account locked. Probably for using my finnish credit card ordering to a spanish address but now everything is sorted after an email and a fax... who would believe they still use those.
    Reply to ralexpalex
  22. May I suggest that while you are waiting, you do two things:

    1. Download and read, cover to cover the case and motherboard manuals.
    2. Buy yourself a #2 magnetic tip Philips screwdriver; it is invaluable for assembly.

    Buena suerte.
    Reply to geofelt
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