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Is overclocking necessary?

Hey guys,

I know that overclocking isn't required but it's nice to overclock it to get stronger results. Though the problem is I am super scared of doing so because I have never done it before and I just dropped $1500 on this new rig so to know that I might damage my new rig by trying it.. I think I rather just keep it stock. Though my question is... Would it be dumb to have such a rig and not over clock it? Or am I fine keeping it stock and enjoying it at stock. here are the specs

i7 7800x
gigabyte aorus x299 ultra gaming
gtx 1080
16gb Corsair vengence DDR4
Reply to aeagan92
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More about overclocking
  1. well, your system is well capable, and will perform very well at stock settings. Some OC for the fun of it, some to eek out extra performance. The performance gains differ from platform to platform, and depend on many variables.

    However, with that said, do you need to? Well, no. There is no requirement to do so. It's a personal choice. Most new systems at stock perform so well, there is no need to OC.

    My advise is to do some research. Google your mobo/cpu combo, and read some guides/watch videos and learn about it before doing it. It's not as daunting as it appears to be. Yes, you need to learn about it, but it can be enjoyable trying to push the system past spec, to see what you can get out of it.
    Reply to keith12
  2. keith12 said:
    well, your system is well capable, and will perform very well at stock settings. Some OC for the fun of it, some to eek out extra performance. The performance gains differ from platform to platform, and depend on many variables.

    However, with that said, do you need to? Well, no. There is no requirement to do so. It's a personal choice. Most new systems at stock perform so well, there is no need to OC.

    My advise is to do some research. Google your mobo/cpu combo, and read some guides/watch videos and learn about it before doing it. It's not as daunting as it appears to be. Yes, you need to learn about it, but it can be enjoyable trying to push the system past spec, to see what you can get out of it.


    Thanks for the reply. That's kinda what I thought. I think from what i've been reading I might just keep it stock for a while. Then in the future if I feel the need to overclock because of higher demanding games etc then I might do so. Though for now like you said, keeping it stock it's more then capable of pushing out great performance. :)
    Reply to aeagan92
  3. I like to build a system that is ready for OC'ing, run it at stock for a few year and then OC it. This way, I get a nice little performance upgrade 3 years into the build, and if I fry it, I fried a 3 year old CPU/Mobo and not something brand new. - my2cents
    Reply to smashjohn
  4. Best answer
    aeagan92 said:
    keith12 said:
    well, your system is well capable, and will perform very well at stock settings. Some OC for the fun of it, some to eek out extra performance. The performance gains differ from platform to platform, and depend on many variables.

    However, with that said, do you need to? Well, no. There is no requirement to do so. It's a personal choice. Most new systems at stock perform so well, there is no need to OC.

    My advise is to do some research. Google your mobo/cpu combo, and read some guides/watch videos and learn about it before doing it. It's not as daunting as it appears to be. Yes, you need to learn about it, but it can be enjoyable trying to push the system past spec, to see what you can get out of it.


    Thanks for the reply. That's kinda what I thought. I think from what i've been reading I might just keep it stock for a while. Then in the future if I feel the need to overclock because of higher demanding games etc then I might do so. Though for now like you said, keeping it stock it's more then capable of pushing out great performance. :)


    Yeah, i think that's a good idea. If you find that the system is holding you back, or your not getting your desired results, then for sure, consider it. But your system is pretty monster right now, so I'd be happy out :)

    Enjoy :)
    Reply to keith12
  5. keith12 said:
    aeagan92 said:
    keith12 said:
    well, your system is well capable, and will perform very well at stock settings. Some OC for the fun of it, some to eek out extra performance. The performance gains differ from platform to platform, and depend on many variables.

    However, with that said, do you need to? Well, no. There is no requirement to do so. It's a personal choice. Most new systems at stock perform so well, there is no need to OC.

    My advise is to do some research. Google your mobo/cpu combo, and read some guides/watch videos and learn about it before doing it. It's not as daunting as it appears to be. Yes, you need to learn about it, but it can be enjoyable trying to push the system past spec, to see what you can get out of it.


    Thanks for the reply. That's kinda what I thought. I think from what i've been reading I might just keep it stock for a while. Then in the future if I feel the need to overclock because of higher demanding games etc then I might do so. Though for now like you said, keeping it stock it's more then capable of pushing out great performance. :)


    Yeah, i think that's a good idea. If you find that the system is holding you back, or your not getting your desired results, then for sure, consider it. But your system is pretty monster right now, so I'd be happy out :)

    Enjoy :)


    Thanks bud! Cheers :)
    Reply to aeagan92
  6. aeagan92 said:
    keith12 said:
    aeagan92 said:
    keith12 said:
    well, your system is well capable, and will perform very well at stock settings. Some OC for the fun of it, some to eek out extra performance. The performance gains differ from platform to platform, and depend on many variables.

    However, with that said, do you need to? Well, no. There is no requirement to do so. It's a personal choice. Most new systems at stock perform so well, there is no need to OC.

    My advise is to do some research. Google your mobo/cpu combo, and read some guides/watch videos and learn about it before doing it. It's not as daunting as it appears to be. Yes, you need to learn about it, but it can be enjoyable trying to push the system past spec, to see what you can get out of it.


    Thanks for the reply. That's kinda what I thought. I think from what i've been reading I might just keep it stock for a while. Then in the future if I feel the need to overclock because of higher demanding games etc then I might do so. Though for now like you said, keeping it stock it's more then capable of pushing out great performance. :)


    Yeah, i think that's a good idea. If you find that the system is holding you back, or your not getting your desired results, then for sure, consider it. But your system is pretty monster right now, so I'd be happy out :)

    Enjoy :)


    Thanks bud! Cheers :)


    No probs, you're very welcome :) On a side note, the system in your sig is still well capable. I'd be holding onto that as a back up/second gaming rig if I were you. Even if you cannibalised some parts for the new rig, a couple of small additions would still make your last one a good backup! :) Just a thought!
    Reply to keith12
  7. smashjohn said:
    I like to build a system that is ready for OC'ing, run it at stock for a few year and then OC it. This way, I get a nice little performance upgrade 3 years into the build, and if I fry it, I fried a 3 year old CPU/Mobo and not something brand new. - my2cents


    Completely agree! I got the Ryzen 1600x with that in mind but it's limited in it's OC, I got it so I could try the OC'ing (because I like to) to see what I can get out of it in the future. The Ryzen's are maxed out about 3.9 to 4.1 depending on what mobo and cooling you use. But now I run it at stock. It kicks ass at everything I throw at it, so I'm happy out. Still, knowing I can get a little extra out of it is peace of mind. On top of the AM4 support until 2020, I can always just stick in Ryzen 2,0 and still get good results.
    Reply to keith12
  8. keith12 said:
    aeagan92 said:
    keith12 said:
    aeagan92 said:
    keith12 said:
    well, your system is well capable, and will perform very well at stock settings. Some OC for the fun of it, some to eek out extra performance. The performance gains differ from platform to platform, and depend on many variables.

    However, with that said, do you need to? Well, no. There is no requirement to do so. It's a personal choice. Most new systems at stock perform so well, there is no need to OC.

    My advise is to do some research. Google your mobo/cpu combo, and read some guides/watch videos and learn about it before doing it. It's not as daunting as it appears to be. Yes, you need to learn about it, but it can be enjoyable trying to push the system past spec, to see what you can get out of it.


    Thanks for the reply. That's kinda what I thought. I think from what i've been reading I might just keep it stock for a while. Then in the future if I feel the need to overclock because of higher demanding games etc then I might do so. Though for now like you said, keeping it stock it's more then capable of pushing out great performance. :)


    Yeah, i think that's a good idea. If you find that the system is holding you back, or your not getting your desired results, then for sure, consider it. But your system is pretty monster right now, so I'd be happy out :)

    Enjoy :)


    Thanks bud! Cheers :)


    No probs, you're very welcome :) On a side note, the system in your sig is still well capable. I'd be holding onto that as a back up/second gaming rig if I were you. Even if you cannibalised some parts for the new rig, a couple of small additions would still make your last one a good backup! :) Just a thought!



    oh most definitely will be keeping it as either a) another gaming pc for the house/backup or b) sell it and make some money back. The thing is I took the gpu and the hd from that one and transferred over to my new rig. So i'm prob gonna buy a gtx970 and another hd for the one in my sig and do those two options. The whole reason for the upgrade was my i5 4690k was having issues with streaming/gaming. At the time I built it I only focused on gaming. Now I wanna stream so decided I needed the more powerful 6 core cpu and of course i had to buy a whole new mobo and ram because of compatibility issues. So that's my story. :)
    Reply to aeagan92
  9. aeagan92 said:
    keith12 said:
    aeagan92 said:
    keith12 said:
    aeagan92 said:
    keith12 said:
    well, your system is well capable, and will perform very well at stock settings. Some OC for the fun of it, some to eek out extra performance. The performance gains differ from platform to platform, and depend on many variables.

    However, with that said, do you need to? Well, no. There is no requirement to do so. It's a personal choice. Most new systems at stock perform so well, there is no need to OC.

    My advise is to do some research. Google your mobo/cpu combo, and read some guides/watch videos and learn about it before doing it. It's not as daunting as it appears to be. Yes, you need to learn about it, but it can be enjoyable trying to push the system past spec, to see what you can get out of it.


    Thanks for the reply. That's kinda what I thought. I think from what i've been reading I might just keep it stock for a while. Then in the future if I feel the need to overclock because of higher demanding games etc then I might do so. Though for now like you said, keeping it stock it's more then capable of pushing out great performance. :)


    Yeah, i think that's a good idea. If you find that the system is holding you back, or your not getting your desired results, then for sure, consider it. But your system is pretty monster right now, so I'd be happy out :)

    Enjoy :)


    Thanks bud! Cheers :)


    No probs, you're very welcome :) On a side note, the system in your sig is still well capable. I'd be holding onto that as a back up/second gaming rig if I were you. Even if you cannibalised some parts for the new rig, a couple of small additions would still make your last one a good backup! :) Just a thought!



    oh most definitely will be keeping it as either a) another gaming pc for the house/backup or b) sell it and make some money back. The thing is I took the gpu and the hd from that one and transferred over to my new rig. So i'm prob gonna buy a gtx970 and another hd for the one in my sig and do those two options. The whole reason for the upgrade was my i5 4690k was having issues with streaming/gaming. At the time I built it I only focused on gaming. Now I wanna stream so decided I needed the more powerful 6 core cpu and of course i had to buy a whole new mobo and ram because of compatibility issues. So that's my story. :)


    Good call! I can't argue with your logic at all. You seem to have a good understanding of where you where, and where you needed to be. Hope you get lots of joy out of both :)
    Reply to keith12
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