My DVD won't let go of my files

I stored some RAR files on a dvd disc because i didn't have a portable HDD at the time, the rar files that were stored on the dvd disc were parts of a folder that was archieved, now i'm trying to get them back to in order to completely restore the folder but a message keeps popping up saying "can't read from source disk" everytime I try to copy or extract the files. I was able to get some of the files off the disc but it's being stubborn about the rest, the disc is not damaged in anyway in fact this was the first time i used the disc at all. Is it because i made sure to fill the entire disc space with the rar files that some part of it might be working? or can dvd's just malfuction for no reason? please help me it would really save my day if you could, I've been at this for days now at just need 8 remaining parts from this disc but it won't let them go.
Reply to irishdragon
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  1. Let's just say the quality of media isn't what it once was, back when 2x discs were $10 each. Worse, things work best when the drive has a stored write strategy for the media, but any older drive isn't going to recognize many newer discs so will revert to a default write algorithm that may end up working poorly.

    It reminds me of how the quality of floppy disks deteriorated badly by the end of their run after all the major manufacturers dropped out, bad enough that floppies in general now have a bad rep (they were actually quite reliable earlier). However you can still buy Verbatim discs with AZO dyes new, so it's not quite so bad yet.

    BTW even a 1-bit error that the drive's error-correction cannot fix can result in an archive file that cannot be opened, so optical is not a safe place to store them.
    Reply to BFG-9000
  2. BFG-9000 said:
    Let's just say the quality of media isn't what it once was, back when 2x discs were $10 each. Worse, things work best when the drive has a stored write strategy for the media, but any older drive isn't going to recognize many newer discs so will revert to a default write algorithm that may end up working poorly.

    It reminds me of how the quality of floppy disks deteriorated badly by the end of their run after all the major manufacturers dropped out, bad enough that floppies in general now have a bad rep (they were actually quite reliable earlier). However you can still buy Verbatim discs with AZO dyes new, so it's not quite so bad yet.

    BTW even a 1-bit error that the drive's error-correction cannot fix can result in an archive file that cannot be opened, so optical is not a safe place to store them.


    I apologize if my response sound svery ignorant since i'm not very tech savy,from you're saying it sounds like a older drive won't work with a newer dvd disc or is it that dvd's are not a good storage device for new computers? in my case my dvd disc is actually older than the computer currently using, but I gonna jump straight to the point is there a way I can get my files back from the disc? whether I have to rip them from the disc forcefully or if there's safer more sure fireway to remedy the problem. I'm all ears if there is a solution to my problem.
    Reply to irishdragon
  3. A generic write strategy can work, but sometimes doesn't--compatibility is a big issue and drives get firmware updates for a couple years or so to cover new media as they come out, but the strategy your drive selected may for example have properly identified your disc as CMC magnetics, and could have tailored things for today's discs but not your old one. Back in the old days they had a poor reputation but now even manufacture Verbatim discs so things change. If you try a combo nobody's tried before then you are doing the beta testing, and shouldn't rely on it until you are satisfied it's reliable

    You can use data recovery software to try to recover the files but note that such software usually will simply fill any truly unreadable parts with zeroes. Most disc tests seem focused on compatibility with standalone DVD players, where such bit errors aren't a big deal--the movie will still play, perhaps with a small glitch. With compressed files though even a single-bit error will make the checksum fail and the file will be marked as corrupt!
    Reply to BFG-9000
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