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1060 3gb vs 1050 ti

On a budget thats 750 or below and I want good fps with good graphics. Here's my build

CPU: Ryzen 3 1200
GPU: GTX 1060 3gb or GTX 1050 ti (Don't know which one buts 1050 ti is more budget friendly)
PSU: EVGA 430W
RAM: 1x8 gb
Case: Some 50 dollar ATX case
Motherboard: MSI b350 Tomahawk

And I have an 88 dollar Moonitor thats 21.5 inch and 1080

BY the way is the PSU enough?
Any other things I could go with for a better performance and not kill my budget?
Reply to solomon Hunter
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about 1060 3gb 1050
  1. never buy 1 stick of RAM .... dont do it !

    2 x 4GB

    if you can stretch to a 1060, it has around 40% more compute power. and if you can go that little bit more, get the 6GB version.

    wheres the hdd? you getting a ssd?
    Reply to SoggyTissue
  2. Best answer
    1. 1x8 GB is fine if and only if you wish to upgrade to 16 gigs in the future. If you'll be on 8 gigs for a long time, then 2x4 would be a better choice.

    2. Garbage PSU, get something like the Seasonic S12II 520W, or the CXM 450(gray label one, not green label one).

    3. Board's a bit expensive, try something cheaper like the ASRock Pro4 board or even an mATX board.

    4. To answer your question, get the GTX 1060 3 GB if you aren't compromising too much to get there. A GTX 1060 6 GB would be even better, if you can afford it.
    Reply to Shektron
  3. Shektron said:
    1. 1x8 GB is fine if and only if you wish to upgrade to 16 gigs in the future. If you'll be on 8 gigs for a long time, then 2x4 would be a better choice.

    2. Garbage PSU, get something like the Seasonic S12II 520W, or the CXM 450(gray label one, not green label one).

    3. Board's a bit expensive, try something cheaper like the ASRock Pro4 board or even an mATX board.

    4. To answer your question, get the GTX 1060 3 GB if you aren't compromising too much to get there. A GTX 1060 6 GB would be even better, if you can afford it.


    I wouldn't even advise getting one stick of 8GB with the plan of adding another later. RAM can be so finicky that even buying the exact same RAM (which you should do) doesn't always work.
    Reply to burdenbound
  4. SoggyTissue said:
    never buy 1 stick of RAM .... dont do it !

    2 x 4GB

    if you can stretch to a 1060, it has around 40% more compute power. and if you can go that little bit more, get the 6GB version.

    wheres the hdd? you getting a ssd?



    Made the list off the top of my head sorry. I have a 1TB Western Blue HDD. I don't have an SSD in my cart, should I get one if im on a budget. And I don't feel like pushing to the 6GB, I still need money for games or if anything goes wrong.
    Reply to solomon Hunter
  5. burdenbound said:
    Shektron said:
    1. 1x8 GB is fine if and only if you wish to upgrade to 16 gigs in the future. If you'll be on 8 gigs for a long time, then 2x4 would be a better choice.

    2. Garbage PSU, get something like the Seasonic S12II 520W, or the CXM 450(gray label one, not green label one).

    3. Board's a bit expensive, try something cheaper like the ASRock Pro4 board or even an mATX board.

    4. To answer your question, get the GTX 1060 3 GB if you aren't compromising too much to get there. A GTX 1060 6 GB would be even better, if you can afford it.


    I wouldn't even advise getting one stick of 8GB with the plan of adding another later. RAM can be so finicky that even buying the exact same RAM (which you should do) doesn't always work.


    I read that 2x4 GB of RAM doesn't really matter.
    Reply to solomon Hunter
  6. solomon Hunter said:
    I read that 2x4 GB of RAM doesn't really matter.

    It doesn't. People make a big deal about dual channel memory, but in real-world benchmarks like games it only gives you about a 2% speed increase. You're not going to be able to tell the difference. It's different if you're doing something memory-intensive - e.g. data compression, encryption, or scientific calculations. It can make a substantial (20%+) difference at those tasks.

    However, since your motherboard has 4 DIMM slots, unless you plan to have more than 40GB in the future, you don't really lose anything by getting 2x4GB instead of 1x8GB. It'll limit you to a max 40GB (2x4GB + 2x16GB), but that's about it. So if the price is about the same, might as well get the 2x4GB so the few specialized tasks which benefit from dual channel memory will benefit.
    Reply to Solandri
  7. MERGED QUESTION
    Question from solomon Hunter : "1060 3gb vs 1050 ti"

    solomon Hunter said:
    On a budget and I plan on running the gtx 1050 ti with ryzen 3 1200. I don't know if I should get the gtx 1060 3gb or if I should stick with 1050 ti and upgrade later. This will be my first PC build and I don't want to mess anything up. Budget is 750 and below and my current cart costs 630 for everything


    travis.eno said:
    As fate would have it, I recently built a system with a friend that included the 1060 3gb. Its run every we've thrown at it with no problem. According to comparison benchmarks it's around 70% faster than the 1050ti. I would make the jump for 50 bucks and include it. The next step up after is almost double the cost. (400ish for a 1070)


    Anonymous said:
    The 1060 3GB is about 40-50% faster than the 1050 Ti, unless it hits a situation where more than 3GB VRAM is needed. Then it becomes a stuttery mess while the 1050 Ti remains usable.

    Currently it's pretty unrealistic to run games and settings that push that much VRAM consumption, but in future games it will likely happen a lot more. So the 1050 Ti is more dependable in that way.
    Reply to rgd1101
  8. to OP, don't duplicate thread on your same question
    Reply to rgd1101
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