Motherboard faulty after GPU and RAM upgrade?

Hi all!
After installing new GPU and additional RAM on my 4,5 year old HP Pavillion Elite HPE h8-1320, the computer is not working anymore. Even if the computer starts (ligths on, PSU-fan and CPU-fan running) I get no signal to monitor - and the computer fails to show up in my computer portfolio in my Remote Desktop software.
I have unplugged the new RAM sticks and replaced the GPU back to the original - still black monitor and no appearance in RDT portfolio.
So I suspect Motherboard have been corrupted during during upgrade, despite all precautions taken.
Any other ideas for what can be wrong?
Computer is (ehhh.... was) basicly good enough for my use - so I'd prefer a MB replacement instead of new pc. BUT which MB's are available for a direct replacement in this computer? From what I can find this is a LGA1155 with Z75 chipset - but not entirely shure about this...
Need your help!
Prior to this upgrade attempt, computer had priginal setup apart from additional harddisk - i.e. PSU, GPU, RAM, etc from original spec.
Reply to attelet
10 answers Last reply
More about motherboard faulty gpu ram upgrade
  1. What are your graphics cards, both the old and the new?
    This could be the result of using a graphics card that use more power than the motherboard and/or PSU can handle. (A known issue with factory built computers.)
    Reply to Olle P
  2. Olle P: Thanks for feedback. But power is not likely to be the issue with me.
    Old GPU: Geforce GT640
    New GPU: Geforce GTX1060
    PSU is rated for 460W, whilst Nvidia recommends min. 400W for the GTX1060. Tried boot with no other equipment connected.
    Also - I did swap back to original GPU, and the problem persisted - so something have happened around the upgrade process
    Reply to attelet
  3. The thing is that some of these "special" motherboards can't provide anywhere near 75W through the PCIe slot but more like 30W maximum, and if you try to pull more the motherboard might fry.
    Given the options that were available for the H8-1320 it should be able to deliver a fair amount of power through the motherboard though...
    Reply to Olle P
  4. "The thing is that some of these "special" motherboards can't provide anywhere near 75W through the PCIe slot but more like 30W maximum, and if you try to pull more the motherboard might fry."

    Ouch - I wasn't aware of this! I have only looked at recommended PSU wattage.
    GTX1060 specs describe 120W as maximum(?) GPU load - and that is well above 75W - not to mention 30W!!
    Searching for more info on my PCI-e slot as I write - and it appears that my specific PCI-e is a 3rd gen (since I have Core-i7 CPU) - and therefore should be capable of enough umph to run the GTX1060

    That aside - I still fear my MB is fried, but since this will be my first fried MB, I have to ask: Will a faulty motherboard still power up CPU- and chassis fans? Because "externally" - everything appears normal upon powering up; LED´s light up, fans start to run, no beeping indicating errors. Only the monitor remains black - Doesn't receive the initial "power-up" signal. And the computer is not detected on my network, so start-up sequence is not reaching network registration
    Reply to attelet
  5. attelet said:
    GTX1060 specs describe 120W as maximum(?) GPU load - and that is well above 75W - not to mention 30W!!
    120W is the "Thermal Design Point", but fairly close to actual sustained usage.
    Half or more of that is drawn from the separate 6-pin PCIe power connector though. You've attached that one to the graphics card, right?
    Reply to Olle P
  6. Olle P said:
    attelet said:
    GTX1060 specs describe 120W as maximum(?) GPU load - and that is well above 75W - not to mention 30W!!
    120W is the "Thermal Design Point", but fairly close to actual sustained usage.
    Half or more of that is drawn from the separate 6-pin PCIe power connector though. You've attached that one to the graphics card, right?


    Yep - the 6-pin connector have been connected to the GTX1060 the whole time.

    But again, the computer doesn't work with old GPU attached either - so the PCI-e slot power capabilities are retorical at the moment.
    I need to figure out whether the motherboard is fried or not - and possible available replacement boards.
    Any ideas on this?
    Reply to attelet
  7. Do you get a video feed directly from the motherboard if using the IGP? (Remove the graphics cards first.)
    If you do get a video feed and can enter BIOS to re-route video to the IGP you can then evaluate the amount and nature of damage. The main objective is to find out what part(s) are broken:
    * Just the PCIe slot and/or something else on the motherboard that's gone?
    * Some output line on the PSU? (Preventing computer/graphics card from running.)
    * CPU and/or RAM?
    You can disconnect the PSU from the computer parts. Hot wire it to start, and then measure the voltage on all lines. Might need some load on one or two make it run at all, and even if voltage at no load is okay it might fail when current is drawn.

    You can find out some details about your computer model here:
    https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c03425386
    Given that the motherboard is beyond usable you're correct that it's a Z75 mobo. Any chipset supporting your CPU (Sandy Bridge or Ivy Bridge?) should do.
    Motherboard form factor seems to be "like" mATX. Not sure that it's true mATX though, and if it's not then you will need a new computer case as well.
    Then there's the PSU. If your motherboard use special connectors (which is less likely) you might also need a new PSU.
    Reply to Olle P
  8. Olle P said:
    Do you get a video feed directly from the motherboard if using the IGP? (Remove the graphics cards first.)
    If you do get a video feed and can enter BIOS to re-route video to the IGP you can then evaluate the amount and nature of damage. The main objective is to find out what part(s) are broken:
    * Just the PCIe slot and/or something else on the motherboard that's gone?
    * Some output line on the PSU? (Preventing computer/graphics card from running.)
    * CPU and/or RAM?
    You can disconnect the PSU from the computer parts. Hot wire it to start, and then measure the voltage on all lines. Might need some load on one or two make it run at all, and even if voltage at no load is okay it might fail when current is drawn.

    You can find out some details about your computer model here:
    https://support.hp.com/us-en/document/c03425386
    Given that the motherboard is beyond usable you're correct that it's a Z75 mobo. Any chipset supporting your CPU (Sandy Bridge or Ivy Bridge?) should do.
    Motherboard form factor seems to be "like" mATX. Not sure that it's true mATX though, and if it's not then you will need a new computer case as well.
    Then there's the PSU. If your motherboard use special connectors (which is less likely) you might also need a new PSU.


    First: I am extremely thankful for all your insight and help, Olle P.

    The two IGP connections (DVI) on computers rear side are covered with hard plastic covers fixed by means of "tamper-free" screws and marked "Do not remove"
    From computer specification: *Integrated video is not available if a graphics card or an Intel processor ending with “P” is installed.
    Because of these warnings, I haven't tried the IGP yet - but as my options are running out, I have nothing to loose on trying this.

    I nicked a PSU from a discarded workstation at office - but sadly this had a diffrent type of CPU power connector (not 4-pin), so I couldn't use it :-(

    The uATX or mATX means a MicroATX motherboard - which I guess is a downsized ATX board (e.g. fewer expansion slots). I have not found uATX with LGA1155 socket and Z75 chipset available - but if I understand you correctly, I doesn't need identical chipset, as long as it supports my IvyBridge CPU?
    So I colud use a MB with any of these chipsets: B75, Q75, Q77, H77, Z75 or Z77?
    Reply to attelet
  9. attelet said:
    The two IGP connections (DVI) on computers rear side are covered with hard plastic covers fixed by means of "tamper-free" screws and marked "Do not remove"
    From computer specification: *Integrated video is not available if a graphics card or an Intel processor ending with “P” is installed.
    As noted: Remove the video card at the same time as you remove those covers, and that shouldn't be a problem.
    The covers are there to avoid users hooking their monitor to it instead of the video card, and then think there's something wrong with the computer when there's no image on screen.

    attelet said:
    I nicked a PSU from a discarded workstation at office - but sadly this had a diffrent type of CPU power connector (not 4-pin), so I couldn't use it :-(
    If there's a bit of space around the socket on the motherboard one end of the 8-pin connector should slide right in and be useful. :)

    attelet said:
    ... if I understand you correctly, I doesn't need identical chipset, as long as it supports my IvyBridge CPU?
    So I colud use a MB with any of these chipsets: B75, Q75, Q77, H77, Z75 or Z77?
    Correct! It's just that you won't be able to overclock it with non-Z motherboards. (If the CPU is at all unlocked in the first place.)
    Reply to Olle P
  10. Today´s update: Removed GPU and plugged monitor to IGP socket
    No difference, whatsoever...
    Assume MB is fried, even if CPU- and cabinet-fans are running and no beep errors are provided
    Given the poor availability of replacement boards, and relative high upgrade cost for "outdated" hardware, I will most likely put my money in a new computer.
    Reply to attelet
Ask a new question Answer

Read More

GPUs Computers RAM