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Motherboard Error Or CPU?

I have two kits of the same RAM in my rig both 2x4gb and my motherboard's manual says its compatible in all DIMM slots yet it no longer lets me boot up in 16Gigs. Could my SSD cause this also, because I formatted it without knowing that I should have afterwards. My SSD has super high disk usage and the response time now is too high could this be the cause for everything?

Specs:
Windows 8.1 64-bit
ASUS Z97-PRO
i5-4670K
G.SKILL F3-14900CL9D-8GBSR
HX750 Corsair
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  1. I'm going to break down your post here as it seems to be a few questions in one.
    Let's start with the RAM. From what I understand you have 4x4GB of RAM. The kit you listed, F3-14900CL9D-8GBSR, is listed in the QVL for the motherboard which is a good sign. The motherboard appears to support up to 32GB of RAM using the 4 slots it has (4x8GB) so this shouldn't be a problem. What we're left with is improper installation, a possible dead stick or two, and an unstated OS.

    We'll start with the OS here. If the OS you installed to the SSD is 64-bit then you should get all 16GB of RAM. If you installed a 32-bit OS then you would be limited to 3-4GB depending on certain options enabled in the OS (Typically 3.5GB). This can also be effected by other things such as onboard graphics being provisioned a portion of the memory for it's own use.

    Next up is improper installation. This one's simple. Just make sure they're installed correctly. When in doubt just take them out and re-seat them. Make sure the notch in the RAM slot lines up with the notch in the RAM sticks. If they fit well the tabs on the RAM slot should snap in to place. The motherboard's manual has a basic outline of how to do this. The online version of the manual shows this as page "2-6" or Chapter 2, Page 6 which is page 64 on the PDF.

    Last up is having dead hardware. I left this one for last as it is quite a bit more labor intensive and time consuming. If you followed the above and are running a 64-bit OS, the RAM's been properly seated, and are still showing less than 16GB total RAM (12, 8, or even 4GB) then we need to do some digging. First, I'd suggest using Windows' built-in memory diagnostic. It takes a while to check your memory but it's very simple to run and will report if there's an issue. If that passes then it's down to testing individual sticks. From what I understand looking at the motherboard's manual (1-7 or page 23) the system will only work using a single stick if it's installed in slot DIMM_A2 (2nd slot away from CPU). You'll be booting from each stick and checking in BIOS to see if it's detected properly. If you have a dead stick you will know right away with this method as the system will refuse to boot with a bad stick. If you get through all 4 individual sticks then you're on to testing them in pairs. If you go through all variations of the pairs then the final test is all 4 sticks at once. If you put all 4 sticks in and finally have a problem then try shifting the sticks around. This is where it gets time consuming, though. See, you're actually hoping that this test will show you which stick is bad but sometimes you'll have one that doesn't play nicely with the others. Although, this USUALLY shows up with the memory diagnostic. If you make it this far and still have trouble then you're looking at more comprehensive tools to test the RAM. Memtest86+ is my go-to for this. If ANY errors show with Memtest86+ then you indeed have a problem. Typically it will tell you which stick it is as well. Either that or it says what size where the error shows (example: 5,324mbyte or 5.2GB which should be DIMM_B2).

    Now for the rest of the post. Can an SSD cause the RAM capacity to shrink? No. Although, when you formatted it did you install a 32-bit OS to the SSD? If that is the case then certainly the 32-bit OS is the reason for your 'missing' RAM.

    High disk usage and long response time on an SSD. This can be a multitude of things and I've already written a book just to test the RAM.
    Did you do a secure erase if possible?
    Was the format NTFS (assuming Windows) or was the format performed by Windows OS installer?
    Is the BIOS set to AHCI mode for the SATA bus?
    Does the OS see that it's an SSD? This sort of coincides with AHCI mode.
    Does the OS have TRIM enabled?
    Lastly, the high disk usage could be a result of a lot of swap file usage compounded by the RAM issue. Unfortunately, if the RAM capacity is low then the OS will use your storage drives as virtual memory and this will result in high disk usage and writes.
    Reply to compprob237
  2. compprob237 said:
    I'm going to break down your post here as it seems to be a few questions in one.
    Let's start with the RAM. From what I understand you have 4x4GB of RAM. The kit you listed, F3-14900CL9D-8GBSR, is listed in the QVL for the motherboard which is a good sign. The motherboard appears to support up to 32GB of RAM using the 4 slots it has (4x8GB) so this shouldn't be a problem. What we're left with is improper installation, a possible dead stick or two, and an unstated OS.

    We'll start with the OS here. If the OS you installed to the SSD is 64-bit then you should get all 16GB of RAM. If you installed a 32-bit OS then you would be limited to 3-4GB depending on certain options enabled in the OS (Typically 3.5GB). This can also be effected by other things such as onboard graphics being provisioned a portion of the memory for it's own use.

    Next up is improper installation. This one's simple. Just make sure they're installed correctly. When in doubt just take them out and re-seat them. Make sure the notch in the RAM slot lines up with the notch in the RAM sticks. If they fit well the tabs on the RAM slot should snap in to place. The motherboard's manual has a basic outline of how to do this. The online version of the manual shows this as page "2-6" or Chapter 2, Page 6 which is page 64 on the PDF.

    Last up is having dead hardware. I left this one for last as it is quite a bit more labor intensive and time consuming. If you followed the above and are running a 64-bit OS, the RAM's been properly seated, and are still showing less than 16GB total RAM (12, 8, or even 4GB) then we need to do some digging. First, I'd suggest using Windows' built-in memory diagnostic. It takes a while to check your memory but it's very simple to run and will report if there's an issue. If that passes then it's down to testing individual sticks. From what I understand looking at the motherboard's manual (1-7 or page 23) the system will only work using a single stick if it's installed in slot DIMM_A2 (2nd slot away from CPU). You'll be booting from each stick and checking in BIOS to see if it's detected properly. If you have a dead stick you will know right away with this method as the system will refuse to boot with a bad stick. If you get through all 4 individual sticks then you're on to testing them in pairs. If you go through all variations of the pairs then the final test is all 4 sticks at once. If you put all 4 sticks in and finally have a problem then try shifting the sticks around. This is where it gets time consuming, though. See, you're actually hoping that this test will show you which stick is bad but sometimes you'll have one that doesn't play nicely with the others. Although, this USUALLY shows up with the memory diagnostic. If you make it this far and still have trouble then you're looking at more comprehensive tools to test the RAM. Memtest86+ is my go-to for this. If ANY errors show with Memtest86+ then you indeed have a problem. Typically it will tell you which stick it is as well. Either that or it says what size where the error shows (example: 5,324mbyte or 5.2GB which should be DIMM_B2).

    Now for the rest of the post. Can an SSD cause the RAM capacity to shrink? No. Although, when you formatted it did you install a 32-bit OS to the SSD? If that is the case then certainly the 32-bit OS is the reason for your 'missing' RAM.

    High disk usage and long response time on an SSD. This can be a multitude of things and I've already written a book just to test the RAM.
    Did you do a secure erase if possible?
    Was the format NTFS (assuming Windows) or was the format performed by Windows OS installer?
    Is the BIOS set to AHCI mode for the SATA bus?
    Does the OS see that it's an SSD? This sort of coincides with AHCI mode.
    Does the OS have TRIM enabled?
    Lastly, the high disk usage could be a result of a lot of swap file usage compounded by the RAM issue. Unfortunately, if the RAM capacity is low then the OS will use your storage drives as virtual memory and this will result in high disk usage and writes.


    I'm using Windows 8.1 64-bit. I've tried every RAM stick and they booted although I had trouble boot it from other DIMM slots. The PC started and died in half a second after I restarted it a few times and hit the MemOK button to check the RAM everything came normal/okay. I had all 16Gigs working yesterday and today when I booted it up it shutdown as soon it was booted and the motherboard kept cycling through codes for minutes. When I manage to turn on the PC with all DIMM slots the task manager only shows slot 1 and 3 active and 2 and 4 empty.
    Reply to l0lapple
  3. l0lapple said:
    I'm using Windows 8.1 64-bit. I've tried every RAM stick and they booted although I had trouble boot it from other DIMM slots. The PC started and died in half a second after I restarted it a few times and hit the MemOK button to check the RAM everything came normal/okay. I had all 16Gigs working yesterday and today when I booted it up it shutdown as soon it was booted and the motherboard kept cycling through codes for minutes. When I manage to turn on the PC with all DIMM slots the task manager only shows slot 1 and 3 active and 2 and 4 empty.


    Ah, well the 64-bit OS solves the possible addressing limit and that OS is aware of what SSDs are. I have a quick question before I move on to the RAM though. Did you dig in to BIOS and make sure AHCI mode was enabled for the SATA controller?

    Now for the RAM did you enable the X.M.P. for the kit? Typically the initial cycling on boot is the motherboard detecting the RAM's reported capabilities through their S.P.D.. While you're in BIOS you can actually see on the EZ Mode page what the motherboard sees. From the pictures in the manual it shows the population of the DIMMs that it detected and their corresponding slots. It also has the drop-down for the X.M.P. it detected for the RAM. Could you also report what version of the BIOS you're running? It should be in the upper-left corner and say "BIOS Ver. ####". From Asus' support website version 0902 states "2. Enhance accuracy for DRAM frequency." which might be the issue here. Although, the most recent BIOS wouldn't hurt to update to since there was a lot of stability updates.

    Here's the link to the BIOS page: https://www.asus.com/us/Motherboards/Z97PRO/HelpDesk_BIOS/
    Only consider doing the BIOS update if you're on an older version than 0902. I tend to suggest not updating the BIOS unless you absolutely have to because of the slight possibility of making the motherboard unusable. It would be a very specific set of circumstances to cause it but it's still possible. Power outage during flashing, cat/kid disconnecting the power cord during flashing, or a write error of some sort. If you do decide to update the BIOS just make sure to follow the manual. It's pretty straightforward and appears to only need a USB drive with the extracted BIOS file on it. Make sure to read everything on the screen as it will tell you if it was successful or not and what to do afterwards. Oh and after you update the BIOS make sure to load the setup defaults then go back in and re-set all of your settings. Loading the default settings solves a lot of strange behavior I've seen after an update.
    Reply to compprob237
  4. My BIOS version is 2702 and ACHI is enabled. All OC options are disabled.

    UPDATE: I'm 100% sure it's my CPU or the CPU socket. I called asus support and eventually it came down to the CPU initialization issue because the motherboard couldn't read/detect it for some odd reason. So in the future I'll be replacing the CPU and maybe the mobo.
    Reply to l0lapple
  5. l0lapple said:
    My BIOS version is 2702 and ACHI is enabled. All OC options are disabled.

    UPDATE: I'm 100% sure it's my CPU or the CPU socket. I called asus support and eventually it came down to the CPU initialization issue because the motherboard couldn't read/detect it for some odd reason. So in the future I'll be replacing the CPU and maybe the mobo.


    Ah, that's unfortunate. That was going to be the last thing to check after making certain the RAM was fine. You'll probably be looking at getting the motherboard repaired by Asus if that's the case. The CPU detection issue is most likely something with the socket. I've actually had a motherboard with a bad socket before but this one was much more terminal (no POST, status lights next to CPU and RAM). Cost about $100 to have Asus fix it outside of warranty.
    Reply to compprob237
  6. compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    My BIOS version is 2702 and ACHI is enabled. All OC options are disabled.

    UPDATE: I'm 100% sure it's my CPU or the CPU socket. I called asus support and eventually it came down to the CPU initialization issue because the motherboard couldn't read/detect it for some odd reason. So in the future I'll be replacing the CPU and maybe the mobo.


    Ah, that's unfortunate. That was going to be the last thing to check after making certain the RAM was fine.You'll probably be looking at getting the motherboard repaired by Asus if that's the case. The CPU detection issue is most likely something with the socket. I've actually had a motherboard with a bad socket before but this one was much more terminal (no POST, status lights next to CPU and RAM). Cost about $100 to have Asus fix it outside of warranty.


    ASUS wants $210 to fix my motherboard which costs just as much so, I rather buy a new one because the warranty ran out. I tried booting up it up earlier today and had the same results. I managed to run a memtest86 when it was working and came up with no errors after +80min. My CPU has one of the pads instead of pins which old CPUs use. One of them looks like its coming off, looks flaky like, sort of like a scab half way off. Although my socket seems normal, besides that I wouldn't know what to exactly look for besides bent pins. My only real worry is when I get another CPU the socket might ruin it.
    Reply to l0lapple
  7. l0lapple said:
    ASUS wants $210 to fix my motherboard which costs just as much so, I rather buy a new one because the warranty ran out. I tried booting up it up earlier today and had the same results. I managed to run a memtest86 when it was working and came up with no errors after +80min. My CPU has one of the pads instead of pins which old CPUs use. One of them looks like its coming off, looks flaky like, sort of like a scab half way off. Although my socket seems normal, besides that I wouldn't know what to exactly look for besides bent pins. My only real worry is when I get another CPU the socket might ruin it.


    Wow that's a lot to get the motherboard fixed. That's probably their standard fee now, too.

    As for the pads on your LGA CPU that's very interesting. I'd actually like to see a picture of it. It kind of sounds like a manufacturing defect and it's so rare that I didn't even consider it as a possible cause. That's mostly why I thought it was the motherboard instead of the CPU after ruling out the RAM.

    If you know anyone with an LGA1150 CPU you could have them pop it in your Z97-Pro and see if the RAM works with a known-good CPU. If everything works fine then it's most certainly that CPU. On the flip-side, if the problem persists then there's a high probability that something's wrong with the motherboard. The risk to their CPU should be quite low in testing this. Additionally, the person with the LGA1150 CPU could also borrow your RAM and see if it works fine in their system to rule it out. Although, I think we're at the point where it's all but a certainty that the RAM is fine.
    Reply to compprob237
  8. l0lapple said:


    Interesting... The picture of the pins is too muddy to really make out any details (besides, they're quite small anyway). The pad on the CPU though. Hmm, I wonder if that's residue of some sort on the pad. Have you tried lightly scraping it with your fingernail? It suggests that the pin associated with that pad might also be bent slightly. If you can determine what pin that is it would just need to be bent straight a tiny bit.

    I'd only suggest doing this if you really think these components are going to head for the trash. I'd suggest trying a CPU from another computer first before messing with the motherboard pins.
    Reply to compprob237
  9. compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:


    Interesting... The picture of the pins is too muddy to really make out any details (besides, they're quite small anyway). The pad on the CPU though. Hmm, I wonder if that's residue of some sort on the pad. Have you tried lightly scraping it with your fingernail? It suggests that the pin associated with that pad might also be bent slightly. If you can determine what pin that is it would just need to be bent straight a tiny bit.

    I'd only suggest doing this if you really think these components are going to head for the trash. I'd suggest trying a CPU from another computer first before messing with the motherboard pins.


    How would residue end up on the bottom of the CPU? I haven't noticed and bent pins but I'll look again.
    Reply to l0lapple
  10. l0lapple said:
    compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:


    Interesting... The picture of the pins is too muddy to really make out any details (besides, they're quite small anyway). The pad on the CPU though. Hmm, I wonder if that's residue of some sort on the pad. Have you tried lightly scraping it with your fingernail? It suggests that the pin associated with that pad might also be bent slightly. If you can determine what pin that is it would just need to be bent straight a tiny bit.

    I'd only suggest doing this if you really think these components are going to head for the trash. I'd suggest trying a CPU from another computer first before messing with the motherboard pins.


    How would residue end up on the bottom of the CPU? I haven't noticed and bent pins but I'll look again.


    It's difficult to discern from the picture. It could be corrosion (usually just discolors though), etching (partial pin contact + electricity arc), leftover residue from manufacturing (kind of rare), or something that ended up on the pad somehow. I've seen a rather large dust bunny pinched between the CPU and the socket before. It's probably not that but it's just an example. Hmm, perhaps thermal paste? I'm just throwing ideas out here.
    Reply to compprob237
  11. compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:


    Interesting... The picture of the pins is too muddy to really make out any details (besides, they're quite small anyway). The pad on the CPU though. Hmm, I wonder if that's residue of some sort on the pad. Have you tried lightly scraping it with your fingernail? It suggests that the pin associated with that pad might also be bent slightly. If you can determine what pin that is it would just need to be bent straight a tiny bit.

    I'd only suggest doing this if you really think these components are going to head for the trash. I'd suggest trying a CPU from another computer first before messing with the motherboard pins.


    How would residue end up on the bottom of the CPU? I haven't noticed and bent pins but I'll look again.


    It's difficult to discern from the picture. It could be corrosion (usually just discolors though), etching (partial pin contact + electricity arc), leftover residue from manufacturing (kind of rare), or something that ended up on the pad somehow. I've seen a rather large dust bunny pinched between the CPU and the socket before. It's probably not that but it's just an example. Hmm, perhaps thermal paste? I'm just throwing ideas out here.


    I don't know if I should have done this but I used a new Qtip to try to remove whatever that thing was on the pad and it came off. I tried booting it up again and got the asus 00 code. :fou:
    Reply to l0lapple
  12. l0lapple said:
    I don't know if I should have done this but I used a new Qtip to try to remove whatever that thing was on the pad and it came off. I tried booting it up again and got the asus 00 code. :fou:


    According to the manual the 00 code on the Q-Code LED is not used. :??:
    Reply to compprob237
  13. compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    I don't know if I should have done this but I used a new Qtip to try to remove whatever that thing was on the pad and it came off. I tried booting it up again and got the asus 00 code. :fou:


    According to the manual the 00 code on the Q-Code LED is not used. :??:


    Could it be PSU issue because I had my PC running for several hours for long periods of time.
    Reply to l0lapple
  14. l0lapple said:
    compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    I don't know if I should have done this but I used a new Qtip to try to remove whatever that thing was on the pad and it came off. I tried booting it up again and got the asus 00 code. :fou:


    According to the manual the 00 code on the Q-Code LED is not used. :??:


    Could it be PSU issue because I had my PC running for several hours for long periods of time.


    PSU causing your motherboard to forget about sticks of RAM? I highly doubt it. The 00 code makes me wonder though. Not related to PSU still but perhaps have you tried resetting the BIOS to default?
    Reply to compprob237
  15. compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    I don't know if I should have done this but I used a new Qtip to try to remove whatever that thing was on the pad and it came off. I tried booting it up again and got the asus 00 code. :fou:


    According to the manual the 00 code on the Q-Code LED is not used. :??:


    Could it be PSU issue because I had my PC running for several hours for long periods of time.


    PSU causing your motherboard to forget about sticks of RAM? I highly doubt it. The 00 code makes me wonder though. Not related to PSU still but perhaps have you tried resetting the BIOS to default?


    EDIT: I'll probably get a new board because when I hit the power button the it doesn't power on the exhaust fan and it keeps giving me Q code 63 or 00 and the VGA LED lights up even though it's seated properly and connected. Recommend any brands for Z97 chipset?
    Reply to l0lapple
  16. l0lapple said:
    EDIT: I'll probably get a new board because when I hit the power button the it doesn't power on the exhaust fan and it keeps giving me Q code 63 or 00 and the VGA LED lights up even though it's seated properly and connected. Recommend any brands for Z97 chipset?


    Usually Asus but Gigabyte and EVGA are great too. EVGA's got great customer service.

    EDIT: Q-code 63 looks to be related to RAM even though the manual mentions it's CPU-related. "CPU DXE initialization" http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/336587-31-motherboard-stuck-error-code-stands-initialized
    Reply to compprob237
  17. compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    EDIT: I'll probably get a new board because when I hit the power button the it doesn't power on the exhaust fan and it keeps giving me Q code 63 or 00 and the VGA LED lights up even though it's seated properly and connected. Recommend any brands for Z97 chipset?


    Usually Asus but Gigabyte and EVGA are great too. EVGA's got great customer service.

    EDIT: Q-code 63 looks to be related to RAM even though the manual mentions it's CPU-related. "CPU DXE initialization" http://www.tomshardware.com/forum/336587-31-motherboard-stuck-error-code-stands-initialized


    I tried every RAM stick while trying to POST, they all failed.
    Reply to l0lapple
  18. l0lapple said:
    I tried every RAM stick while trying to POST, they all failed.
    Do you have any willing friends that could put your RAM in their computer to test it? It would be a simple way to rule out the RAM as the problem but I honestly think we've determined that it's CPU or motherboard.

    It's unfortunate, this would be such an easy thing to figure out if you had known-good parts you could swap around. I've got a bunch of stuff in my shop but your particular platform is the rare exception. Swapping parts was how I learned something was wrong with the Asus Sabertooth X58 I picked up from ebay a while back. Took known-working parts and put them in that motherboard. Boot issues immediately told me something was wrong. A little double-checking and minor testing and I determined that the motherboard itself was bad.
    Reply to compprob237
  19. compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    I tried every RAM stick while trying to POST, they all failed.
    Do you have any willing friends that could put your RAM in their computer to test it? It would be a simple way to rule out the RAM as the problem but I honestly think we've determined that it's CPU or motherboard.

    It's unfortunate, this would be such an easy thing to figure out if you had known-good parts you could swap around. I've got a bunch of stuff in my shop but your particular platform is the rare exception. Swapping parts was how I learned something was wrong with the Asus Sabertooth X58 I picked up from ebay a while back. Took known-working parts and put them in that motherboard. Boot issues immediately told me something was wrong. A little double-checking and minor testing and I determined that the motherboard itself was bad.



    I talked with someone from ASUS about this, and he thinks its the motherboard which weird because the other one before him thought it was a CPU issue. I keep getting these codes 00, b6, db, a2 and the EZ XMP light turns on for whatever reason. Nothing is overclocked on this board. Could this be a PSU issue because when I hit the power button it takes 3 to 5 tries to boot it up even without a graphics card. The PSU fan would spin up once for a second and just idle, I'm not sure if that's normal because it's a 80+ gold. Before I posted this I was on game and the PC just died twice before I couldn't boot it up anymore, neither CPU or GPU were overheating.
    Reply to l0lapple
  20. Best answer
    l0lapple said:
    compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    I tried every RAM stick while trying to POST, they all failed.
    Do you have any willing friends that could put your RAM in their computer to test it? It would be a simple way to rule out the RAM as the problem but I honestly think we've determined that it's CPU or motherboard.

    It's unfortunate, this would be such an easy thing to figure out if you had known-good parts you could swap around. I've got a bunch of stuff in my shop but your particular platform is the rare exception. Swapping parts was how I learned something was wrong with the Asus Sabertooth X58 I picked up from ebay a while back. Took known-working parts and put them in that motherboard. Boot issues immediately told me something was wrong. A little double-checking and minor testing and I determined that the motherboard itself was bad.



    I talked with someone from ASUS about this, and he thinks its the motherboard which weird because the other one before him thought it was a CPU issue. I keep getting these codes 00, b6, db, a2 and the EZ XMP light turns on for whatever reason. Nothing is overclocked on this board. Could this be a PSU issue because when I hit the power button it takes 3 to 5 tries to boot it up even without a graphics card. The PSU fan would spin up once for a second and just idle, I'm not sure if that's normal because it's a 80+ gold. Before I posted this I was on game and the PC just died twice before I couldn't boot it up anymore, neither CPU or GPU were overheating.


    If it was the PSU it would refuse to boot up at all. The usual symptoms are simple. Either the fans spin briefly and then it turns off (no boot at all, no codes on motherboard) or it will simply not turn on at all.

    The random errors you're getting seem to be more indicating motherboard. Especially because of how erratic they are.

    EDIT: Are these status codes where the motherboard freezes on boot up or are they just numbers you see as it boots?
    Reply to compprob237
  21. compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    I tried every RAM stick while trying to POST, they all failed.
    Do you have any willing friends that could put your RAM in their computer to test it? It would be a simple way to rule out the RAM as the problem but I honestly think we've determined that it's CPU or motherboard.

    It's unfortunate, this would be such an easy thing to figure out if you had known-good parts you could swap around. I've got a bunch of stuff in my shop but your particular platform is the rare exception. Swapping parts was how I learned something was wrong with the Asus Sabertooth X58 I picked up from ebay a while back. Took known-working parts and put them in that motherboard. Boot issues immediately told me something was wrong. A little double-checking and minor testing and I determined that the motherboard itself was bad.



    I talked with someone from ASUS about this, and he thinks its the motherboard which weird because the other one before him thought it was a CPU issue. I keep getting these codes 00, b6, db, a2 and the EZ XMP light turns on for whatever reason. Nothing is overclocked on this board. Could this be a PSU issue because when I hit the power button it takes 3 to 5 tries to boot it up even without a graphics card. The PSU fan would spin up once for a second and just idle, I'm not sure if that's normal because it's a 80+ gold. Before I posted this I was on game and the PC just died twice before I couldn't boot it up anymore, neither CPU or GPU were overheating.


    If it was the PSU it would refuse to boot up at all. The usual symptoms are simple. Either the fans spin briefly and then it turns off (no boot at all, no codes on motherboard) or it will simply not turn on at all.

    The random errors you're getting seem to be more indicating motherboard. Especially because of how erratic they are.

    EDIT: Are these status codes where the motherboard freezes on boot up or are they just numbers you see as it boots?


    It freezes up on code 00 and maybe other codes. I would hit the power button on the case or on the mobo and neither would boot up after many attempts of spamming it and only after that it boots.
    Reply to l0lapple
  22. l0lapple said:
    It freezes up on code 00 and maybe other codes. I would hit the power button on the case or on the mobo and neither would boot up after many attempts of spamming it and only after that it boots.

    That still sounds like the motherboard to me. If it had a bad capacitor it would exhibit erratic behavior like that. I mean, there is a chance that the PSU could be feeding it erratic power but I've never had one do that ever. I've dealt with a lot of PSUs, and repair them, and never came across a single one that did that. Not even the cheap Aspire PSU with a bowed circuit board.
    Reply to compprob237
  23. compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    It freezes up on code 00 and maybe other codes. I would hit the power button on the case or on the mobo and neither would boot up after many attempts of spamming it and only after that it boots.

    That still sounds like the motherboard to me. If it had a bad capacitor it would exhibit erratic behavior like that. I mean, there is a chance that the PSU could be feeding it erratic power but I've never had one do that ever. I've dealt with a lot of PSUs, and repair them, and never came across a single one that did that. Not even the cheap Aspire PSU with a bowed circuit board.


    I tested 1 kit of RAM on another PC with the PSU which booted it up. This is the same kit of RAM I used to boot my PC. I might test the other kit but I doubt anything is wrong with it.

    Any idea why I cannot flashback the bios? Most of my peripherals don't work now when I boot the PC, would that be caused by a CPU error or a board? Also I tried booting my board without a CPU not sure if it would boot without it because its a new board generally speaking, but I got the same code 00, now when I try it just gives me a 63 q-code I know what it means the manual doesn't tell me how to fix it. :pt1cable:
    Reply to l0lapple
  24. l0lapple said:
    compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    It freezes up on code 00 and maybe other codes. I would hit the power button on the case or on the mobo and neither would boot up after many attempts of spamming it and only after that it boots.

    That still sounds like the motherboard to me. If it had a bad capacitor it would exhibit erratic behavior like that. I mean, there is a chance that the PSU could be feeding it erratic power but I've never had one do that ever. I've dealt with a lot of PSUs, and repair them, and never came across a single one that did that. Not even the cheap Aspire PSU with a bowed circuit board.


    I tested 1 kit of RAM on another PC with the PSU which booted it up. This is the same kit of RAM I used to boot my PC. I might test the other kit but I doubt anything is wrong with it.

    Any idea why I cannot flashback the bios? Most of my peripherals don't work now when I boot the PC, would that be caused by a CPU error or a board? Also I tried booting my board without a CPU not sure if it would boot without it because its a new board generally speaking, but I got the same code 00, now when I try it just gives me a 63 q-code I know what it means the manual doesn't tell me how to fix it. :pt1cable:


    Aside from testing your CPU in another known-working system I think it's safe to say the CPU or motherboard is toast. The only way to know for sure is to test the CPU in a working system. I'm afraid to suggest purchasing a used motherboard since the CPU could possibly be bad and you'd effectively burn money. The Q-code makes me think it's the motherboard but the CPU could still be the problem.

    What it boils down to is that you need to take your CPU and test it in a working computer. If it works fine then you need a new motherboard. If it has problems like before then you need a new CPU.
    Reply to compprob237
  25. compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    compprob237 said:
    l0lapple said:
    It freezes up on code 00 and maybe other codes. I would hit the power button on the case or on the mobo and neither would boot up after many attempts of spamming it and only after that it boots.

    That still sounds like the motherboard to me. If it had a bad capacitor it would exhibit erratic behavior like that. I mean, there is a chance that the PSU could be feeding it erratic power but I've never had one do that ever. I've dealt with a lot of PSUs, and repair them, and never came across a single one that did that. Not even the cheap Aspire PSU with a bowed circuit board.


    I tested 1 kit of RAM on another PC with the PSU which booted it up. This is the same kit of RAM I used to boot my PC. I might test the other kit but I doubt anything is wrong with it.

    Any idea why I cannot flashback the bios? Most of my peripherals don't work now when I boot the PC, would that be caused by a CPU error or a board? Also I tried booting my board without a CPU not sure if it would boot without it because its a new board generally speaking, but I got the same code 00, now when I try it just gives me a 63 q-code I know what it means the manual doesn't tell me how to fix it. :pt1cable:


    Aside from testing your CPU in another known-working system I think it's safe to say the CPU or motherboard is toast. The only way to know for sure is to test the CPU in a working system. I'm afraid to suggest purchasing a used motherboard since the CPU could possibly be bad and you'd effectively burn money. The Q-code makes me think it's the motherboard but the CPU could still be the problem.

    What it boils down to is that you need to take your CPU and test it in a working computer. If it works fine then you need a new motherboard. If it has problems like before then you need a new CPU.


    I can't do a BIOS flashback...so I guess that narrows it down to the board.
    Reply to l0lapple
  26. I just watched that video you linked in PM and did some more digging on the hang with Q-code 63. It looks like it's related to RAM. Many posts saying dying/bad stick or bad seating (one had bent pins in the slot!) was the cause. After that it was the motherboard.

    Pull all sticks of RAM and see if it hangs at the same Q-code. Either outcome will give you some more detail. Same Q-code means it isn't the RAM. Different Q-code means the RAM's involved somehow. If you get a different Q-code then try one stick of RAM at a time in DIMM_A2, as per the manual, and see if you get a stick that makes it hang on that original Q-code it hang on. If none match the Q-code hang then try DIMM_A1, DIMM_B2, and finally DIMM_B1 all individually and with each stick one at a time. It may be tedious but it's the last option you have. I'd suggest a visual inspection of the DIMM slots but you'd need to know what to look for and probably need a magnifying glass. Lastly, try removing the CMOS battery for at least a minute to make sure the BIOS configuration is reset and see if that solves it.
    Reply to compprob237
  27. compprob237 said:
    I just watched that video you linked in PM and did some more digging on the hang with Q-code 63. It looks like it's related to RAM. Many posts saying dying/bad stick or bad seating (one had bent pins in the slot!) was the cause. After that it was the motherboard.

    Pull all sticks of RAM and see if it hangs at the same Q-code. Either outcome will give you some more detail. Same Q-code means it isn't the RAM. Different Q-code means the RAM's involved somehow. If you get a different Q-code then try one stick of RAM at a time in DIMM_A2, as per the manual, and see if you get a stick that makes it hang on that original Q-code it hang on. If none match the Q-code hang then try DIMM_A1, DIMM_B2, and finally DIMM_B1 all individually and with each stick one at a time. It may be tedious but it's the last option you have. I'd suggest a visual inspection of the DIMM slots but you'd need to know what to look for and probably need a magnifying glass. Lastly, try removing the CMOS battery for at least a minute to make sure the BIOS configuration is reset and see if that solves it.


    No luck.
    Reply to l0lapple
  28. l0lapple said:
    No luck.
    Same Q-code regardless of RAM stick location or no RAM at all?
    If that's the case: Motherboard or CPU. I can't say for certain if it's either. The memory controller is a part of the CPU so if there's a problem with the CPU it will not behave. If there's a problem with the motherboard then it will act basically the same. I'm leaning more toward the motherboard because I've never had a CPU die on me but have had plenty of motherboards die.
    Reply to compprob237
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