MSI - B350 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard

I was wondering what effect does the motherboard have in gaming. I will play FPS games like PUBG and GTA 5 and high FPS games like those.

I am hope to buy the hardware below:

MotherBoard: MSI B350 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard
CPU: Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor
GPU: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB G1 Gaming Video Card
Monitor: AOC - Q2778VQE 27.0" 2560x1440 60Hz Monitor

I hope to buy these and I was wondering for the CPU and GPU is the MSI B350 the best match and would it work well? Also if I get a better and more expensive motherboard would I need to buy more than a 620W power supply?

For suggestions I do not want anything over £250. Since the MSI B350 is only £100.
Reply to Itz_TryFX
6 answers Last reply
More about msi b350 tomahawk atx am4 motherboard
  1. Motherboards does not have a DIRECT effect in gaming. In can, however, INDIRECTLY affect the possible components that one can use, to which such components (like GPU, CPU, RAM) can directly affect gaming.

    Some motherboards can support multi-GPU (some Nvidia SLI, some AMD CrossFire only), which, can produce higher FPS (frames per second), provided, the multi-GPU setup scales well with the game.

    Some motherboards also have better VRMs/Power Phases/Optional Additional +12V which can aid the voltage regulation of CPUs/RAMs during high or extreme OC'ing, which, also can produce higher FPS, provided, an appropriate cooling setup.

    Some motherboards can support higher speed RAM, provided with BIOS update/support, while some does not play well with certain RAM design, speed, or latency, or have limited RAM slots/RAM capacity.

    All these motherboard features (among others), again, are INDIRECTLY related to gaming as they only pertain to the possible component configurations you can do.

    The MSI B350 is a decent motherboard if you are not looking at extreme performance or only have a tight budget.

    Your rig can be (more than adequately) powered by a good-quality 550W (no need for higher than 600W). Here's one PSU which has great quality, 10-year warranty, and highly-reviewed at a good price as of this date:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    Power Supply: Corsair - RMx 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply (£78.97 @ Amazon UK)
    Total: £78.97
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-09-30 20:12 BST+0100

    You may also want to, as an option, look at monitors that can do more than 60fps (i.e., more than 60Hz), since you will be playing a lot of fast-paced games and have a very powerful GPU (GTX 1080) that can actually do 100+ fps on most games at 1440p, depending on your graphics settings.
    Reply to raisonjohn
  2. raisonjohn said:
    Motherboards does not have a DIRECT effect in gaming. In can, however, INDIRECTLY affect the possible components that one can use, to which such components (like GPU, CPU, RAM) can directly affect gaming.

    Some motherboards can support multi-GPU (some Nvidia SLI, some AMD CrossFire only), which, can produce higher FPS (frames per second), provided, the multi-GPU setup scales well with the game.

    Some motherboards also have better VRMs/Power Phases/Optional Additional +12V which can aid the voltage regulation of CPUs/RAMs during high or extreme OC'ing, which, also can produce higher FPS, provided, an appropriate cooling setup.

    Some motherboards can support higher speed RAM, provided with BIOS update/support, while some does not play well with certain RAM design, speed, or latency, or have limited RAM slots/RAM capacity.

    All these motherboard features (among others), again, are INDIRECTLY related to gaming as they only pertain to the possible component configurations you can do.

    The MSI B350 is a decent motherboard if you are not looking at extreme performance or only have a tight budget.

    Your rig can be (more than adequately) powered by a good-quality 550W (no need for higher than 600W). Here's one PSU which has great quality, 10-year warranty, and highly-reviewed at a good price as of this date:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    Power Supply: Corsair - RMx 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply (£78.97 @ Amazon UK)
    Total: £78.97
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-09-30 20:12 BST+0100

    You may also want to, as an option, look at monitors that can do more than 60fps (i.e., more than 60Hz), since you will be playing a lot of fast-paced games and have a very powerful GPU (GTX 1080) that can actually do 100+ fps on most games at 1440p, depending on your graphics settings.


    So you say the motherboard I have is good enough and no need to go get a more expensive one?

    Also you said with all my hardware a 550W power supply is enough and I don't need a higher one? Just to double check I will go ahead and put all my components down below.

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor

    Motherboard: MSI - B350 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard

    Memory: Team - Vulcan 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory

    Storage: SanDisk - SSD PLUS 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive

    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive

    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB G1 Gaming Video Card

    Case: Corsair - SPEC-01 RED ATX Mid Tower Case

    Power Supply: SeaSonic - S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply

    Monitor: AOC - Q2778VQE 27.0" 2560x1440 60Hz Monitor


    Also you said the 550W power supply is £78.97 however the 620W power supply I have is £64.42 so it is cheaper. Do you think if I go ahead and keep my power supply at 620W or could it could damage my pc in the long run or damage it in anyway?

    With the monitor you said get a higher Hz monitor like a 144Hz monitor. Would this monitor be alright?

    Old pick: AOC - Q2778VQE 27.0" 2560x1440 60Hz Monitor (£209.99 @ Amazon UK)
    New pick: ASUS MG279Q 27 inch IPS Gaming Monitor (2560 x 1440, 144 Hz, 4 ms, - Black (£520.96@ Amazon Prime)
    Alternative pick: ASUS VG248QE 24 inch Widescreen LED Multimedia 3D Monitor (1920 x 1080, 80000000:1, 144 Hz, 1 ms, (£239.87 )

    Since there is a massive price difference between my old pick and new pick would It make more sense to drop to a GTX 1070 or even a GTX 1060 or even just buy the alternative pick? however that is a 1080p monitor not a 1440p

    And If I was to drop to a min GTX 1060 would I not be able to play the games like PUBG or GTA 5 at max settings? If I have to I could drop to close to max settings.
    Reply to Itz_TryFX
  3. The Seasonic S12II-620 is a solid/decent unit (but a bit outdated). It has non-modular cables (which means all the cables are attached to the PSU, even the ones you will not need, and will contribute to the clutter inside your Spec-01 chassis). It has a 5-year warranty, rated at 40C oper. temp., and provides 48A (576W) at +12V.

    The Corsair RM550x is a high-quality high-end unit and is better in overall performance than the Seasonic S12II-620. It has fully modular cables (which means you will only plug in the cables that you need, especially for that Spec-01 case with poor cable management design and no PSU shrouds). It has a 10-year warranty, rated at 50C oper. temp., and provides 45A (550W) at +12V.

    The price/performance, the difference of only £14.55 between the two units is worth it to get the much better PSU.

    Note that using a higher-rated PSU will not damage your PC (using a low-quality PSU will). The PSU will only provide the wattage your PC consumes. So, even if your PSU is rated at 1500W but your power consumption is only 250W, the PC will only draw ~21A (~250W at 12V) from that PSU - not 1500W.

    However, one must take into account the power efficiency of the PSU. The point where the highest efficiency is obtained is somewhere in the vicinity of 40% to 60% of power draw.

    Less or more than that, usually, the efficiency becomes lower. Low efficiency means more power is converted into heat (may stress the PSU in high loads). Higher efficiency means less power is converted into heat (contributes to PSU's longevity as well as draws lesser electricity from your AC power outlet). So, it is not always good to have an excessively-rated PSU than what you will need (but it helps for additional headroom in case of future upgrades and/or overclocking).

    The 550W is more than enough for the list of components you will get (Ryzen 5 1600 + GTX 1080 + others) and will have ample headroom for OC and future upgrades (except for multi-GPU setups).

    As for the GPU-monitor pairing, more often than not (depending on the graphics settings and actual game requirements):

    GTX 1080 ideal for gaming in: 1440p/~100Hz+ or 1080p/~144Hz monitors
    GTX 1070 ideal for gaming in: 1440p/~60Hz or 1080p/~100Hz+ monitors
    GTX 1060 (6GB) ideal for gaming in: 1080p/~60Hz monitors
    (Note: this is not a hard-and-fast rule, but, more of a general guideline/case-to-case basis)

    Problem with GTX 1070 is price/performance (due to mining that jacked-up prices). Most models of the GTX 1070 are less than £100 difference from the GTX 1080, which makes one consider the GTX 1080 a better value (esp. for future games that might have higher system requirements). Problem with downgrading to a GTX 1060 (6GB) is it is intended for 1080p gaming and you might be severely limited in frames-per-second output esp. on AAA games like GTA V on maxed or high-ultra settings (even on 1080p resolution).

    You can get the £475 Gigabyte GTX 1080 Windforce (instead of the more expensive £495 G1 version):

    Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB WINDFORCE OC 8G Video Card (£474.99 @ Aria PC)

    For the monitor, the Asus VG248QE (1080p/144Hz) is one of the old-time favorites for such fast-paced gaming. It costs £225 here:

    Monitor: Asus - VG248QE 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor (£225.00 @ Aria PC)

    Another monitor suggestion, if you prefer 1440p with high-refresh rates and are willing to invest some £475 (instead of your alternative Asus MG279Q pick at £521), I would suggest this G-Sync capable 24" monitor instead:

    Monitor: Dell - S2417DG 23.8" 2560x1440 165Hz Monitor (£473.61 @ Amazon UK)

    The G-Sync will allow your monitor to vary its refresh rate to coincide with the frame output of your GPU and produce smoother gameplay, even if your GPU's FPS output is significantly below the monitor's max. rated refresh rate. There's also a 27" version of the suggested Dell G-Sync monitor, but costs £550.

    Cheapest monitor with G-Sync that you can consider to pair with the GTX 1080 is the 24" AOC G2460PG (1080p/144Hz) at only £353:

    Monitor: AOC - G2460PG 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor (£353.40 @ Aria PC)

    It largely depends on your personal preference, as to size and resolution, (and budget-constraints) which of the aforementioned high-refresh rate monitors you would get.

    To give you an idea of the overall costs of your entire parts (with suggested modifications for price/performance), your rig would end up at about £1470 (including G-Sync monitor and GTX 1080 GPU):

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor (£181.00 @ Amazon UK)
    Motherboard: MSI - B350 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard (£95.62 @ Box Limited)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory (£119.65 @ Amazon UK)
    Storage: Crucial - MX300 275GB 2.5" Solid State Drive (£79.97 @ Amazon UK)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£37.20 @ Aria PC)
    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB WINDFORCE OC 8G Video Card (£474.99 @ Aria PC)
    Case: Corsair - SPEC-01 RED ATX Mid Tower Case (£47.77 @ Amazon UK)
    Power Supply: Corsair - RMx 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply (£78.97 @ Amazon UK)
    Monitor: AOC - G2460PG 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor (£353.40 @ Aria PC)
    Total: £1468.57
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-01 02:06 BST+0100
    Reply to raisonjohn
  4. raisonjohn said:
    The Seasonic S12II-620 is a solid/decent unit (but a bit outdated). It has non-modular cables (which means all the cables are attached to the PSU, even the ones you will not need, and will contribute to the clutter inside your Spec-01 chassis). It has a 5-year warranty, rated at 40C oper. temp., and provides 48A (576W) at +12V.

    The Corsair RM550x is a high-quality high-end unit and is better in overall performance than the Seasonic S12II-620. It has fully modular cables (which means you will only plug in the cables that you need, especially for that Spec-01 case with poor cable management design and no PSU shrouds). It has a 10-year warranty, rated at 50C oper. temp., and provides 45A (550W) at +12V.

    The price/performance, the difference of only £14.55 between the two units is worth it to get the much better PSU.

    Note that using a higher-rated PSU will not damage your PC (using a low-quality PSU will). The PSU will only provide the wattage your PC consumes. So, even if your PSU is rated at 1500W but your power consumption is only 250W, the PC will only draw ~21A (~250W at 12V) from that PSU - not 1500W.

    However, one must take into account the power efficiency of the PSU. The point where the highest efficiency is obtained is somewhere in the vicinity of 40% to 60% of power draw.

    Less or more than that, usually, the efficiency becomes lower. Low efficiency means more power is converted into heat (may stress the PSU in high loads). Higher efficiency means less power is converted into heat (contributes to PSU's longevity as well as draws lesser electricity from your AC power outlet). So, it is not always good to have an excessively-rated PSU than what you will need (but it helps for additional headroom in case of future upgrades and/or overclocking).

    The 550W is more than enough for the list of components you will get (Ryzen 5 1600 + GTX 1080 + others) and will have ample headroom for OC and future upgrades (except for multi-GPU setups).

    As for the GPU-monitor pairing, more often than not (depending on the graphics settings and actual game requirements):

    GTX 1080 ideal for gaming in: 1440p/~100Hz+ or 1080p/~144Hz monitors
    GTX 1070 ideal for gaming in: 1440p/~60Hz or 1080p/~100Hz+ monitors
    GTX 1060 (6GB) ideal for gaming in: 1080p/~60Hz monitors
    (Note: this is not a hard-and-fast rule, but, more of a general guideline/case-to-case basis)

    Problem with GTX 1070 is price/performance (due to mining that jacked-up prices). Most models of the GTX 1070 are less than £100 difference from the GTX 1080, which makes one consider the GTX 1080 a better value (esp. for future games that might have higher system requirements). Problem with downgrading to a GTX 1060 (6GB) is it is intended for 1080p gaming and you might be severely limited in frames-per-second output esp. on AAA games like GTA V on maxed or high-ultra settings (even on 1080p resolution).

    You can get the £475 Gigabyte GTX 1080 Windforce (instead of the more expensive £495 G1 version):

    Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB WINDFORCE OC 8G Video Card (£474.99 @ Aria PC)

    For the monitor, the Asus VG248QE (1080p/144Hz) is one of the old-time favorites for such fast-paced gaming. It costs £225 here:

    Monitor: Asus - VG248QE 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor (£225.00 @ Aria PC)

    Another monitor suggestion, if you prefer 1440p with high-refresh rates and are willing to invest some £475 (instead of your alternative Asus MG279Q pick at £521), I would suggest this G-Sync capable 24" monitor instead:

    Monitor: Dell - S2417DG 23.8" 2560x1440 165Hz Monitor (£473.61 @ Amazon UK)

    The G-Sync will allow your monitor to vary its refresh rate to coincide with the frame output of your GPU and produce smoother gameplay, even if your GPU's FPS output is significantly below the monitor's max. rated refresh rate. There's also a 27" version of the suggested Dell G-Sync monitor, but costs £550.

    Cheapest monitor with G-Sync that you can consider to pair with the GTX 1080 is the 24" AOC G2460PG (1080p/144Hz) at only £353:

    Monitor: AOC - G2460PG 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor (£353.40 @ Aria PC)

    It largely depends on your personal preference, as to size and resolution, (and budget-constraints) which of the aforementioned high-refresh rate monitors you would get.

    To give you an idea of the overall costs of your entire parts (with suggested modifications for price/performance), your rig would end up at about £1470 (including G-Sync monitor and GTX 1080 GPU):

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor (£181.00 @ Amazon UK)
    Motherboard: MSI - B350 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard (£95.62 @ Box Limited)
    Memory: Corsair - Vengeance LPX 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3200 Memory (£119.65 @ Amazon UK)
    Storage: Crucial - MX300 275GB 2.5" Solid State Drive (£79.97 @ Amazon UK)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£37.20 @ Aria PC)
    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB WINDFORCE OC 8G Video Card (£474.99 @ Aria PC)
    Case: Corsair - SPEC-01 RED ATX Mid Tower Case (£47.77 @ Amazon UK)
    Power Supply: Corsair - RMx 550W 80+ Gold Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply (£78.97 @ Amazon UK)
    Monitor: AOC - G2460PG 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor (£353.40 @ Aria PC)
    Total: £1468.57
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-10-01 02:06 BST+0100



    PSU:
    So you say there is no need to get a 620W PSU and it is outdated. So for the £14 it is worth it. Okay got that

    Monitor:
    So instead of downgrading my GPU you say get a better monitor, Would you rather me get the Dell or AOC monitor?

    Dell - S2417DG 23.8" 2560x1440 165Hz Monitor (£473.61 @ Amazon UK) - no G-sync
    AOC - G2460PG 24.0" 1920x1080 144Hz Monitor (£353.40 @ Aria PC) - has G-sync

    I know the dell is over £100 more but I heard that if your getting a GPU you might as well get a 1440p monitor or its just unnecessary. The Dell is much more expensive with a 1440p monitor but it has no G-sync. Would you rather say I go for the cheaper 1080p option and get g-sync with it atleast?


    GPU:
    What difference does the GTX 1080 G1 and the GTX 1080 Windforce have?
    Is it just two different companies selling the same product for different prices?
    And you suggested that I might as well not downgrade to a GTX 1070 for just £100 difference, I understand that. Would getting the cheaper one effect my gameplay in anyway shape or form?

    Also since the motherboard and other things have cleared up you said it would cost around £1400, that is only if I choose to keep my CPU, I made a thread about CPU's, the new Intel i7-8200k / i7-something like that // vs ryzen 5 1600.
    Please keep that into account then make my final price from what your picks are.
    http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/answers/id-3532502/ryzen-1600-intel-core-875k.html

    Either reply on this thread or that one and tell me which CPU will be the wise option and which one to pick and if you say the Intel CPU is what I need instead of the Ryzen 5 1600, then please tell me my final price.

    Thanks!
    Reply to Itz_TryFX
  5. The two monitors you are comparing in your last post and which I also mentioned in the post before that (Dell S2417DG and AOC G2460PG) BOTH have G-Sync.

    It all boils down to preferred resolution.

    At 1440p, the CPU takes less of the load in communicating with the GPU in rendering frames. At 1080p, the CPU takes more of the load than the GPU. That was the point in the other thread. Though the Ryzen 5 1600 can also reach 144fps in certain scenarios at 1080p (depending on the graphics settings and the game itself), it is true that Intel CPUs (such as the i7-8700K) would be the best (but more expensive) option at that lower resolution esp. if your graphics settings are set to ultra/maxed out, due to the significantlly faster clock speeds of the Intel CPU.

    The i7-8700K, with 6C/12T at 3.7GHz to 4.7GHz clock speeds, and overclockable, may cost more than $360* (more than ~£270*) plus costs for a good aftermarket cooler (say about ~£60++) as the Intel CPU doesn't come with one. On the other hand, the Ryzen 5 1600, with 6C/12T at lower clock speeds of 3.2GHz to 3.6GHz, and also overclockable (can easily reach 4.0GHz on the included stock cooler), will only cost you ~£180.

    If we consider what was said on the thread on CPU-Monitor pairing: The 1440p/165Hz with G-Sync Dell S2417DG (at ~£470) can be paired with the Ryzen 5 1600 (~£180) for a total cost of ~£650. The 1080p/144Hz with G-Sync AOC G2460PG (at ~£350) can be paired with the i7-8700K (~£270*) + CPU cooler (~£60++) for a total cost of ~£680++. (*Note that the price of the i7-8700K is subjective and not retail pricing).

    The higher resolution monitor will produce much richer/smoother details than the lower resolution monitor due to pixel density (relative also to how far away your eyesight is from the screen, given the screen size).

    My choice would be the 1440p/165Hz monitor, provided you have sufficient budget for such.

    As for the GPU, both GTX 1080 G1 and GTX 1080 Windforce OC is made by the same manufacturer, Gigabyte. There are only two major differences between these models. They are:

    1) G1 version has a very slightly higher factory-set clock speeds of 1695GHz-1835GHz (default) and 1721MHz-1860MHz (OC-mode) while the Windforce OC has 1632MHz-1771MHz (default) and 1657MHz-1797MHz (OC-mode). Such difference is only miniscule, at only 63MHz-64MHz (that's only 0.064GHz). You can always manually overclock any of the two GPUs to higher clock speeds and match the other.

    2) G1 version has RGB lighting, while the Windforce OC does not.

    The rest of the features and performance is very similar to the other.

    If you consider getting the lesser-value (due to the pricing) GTX 1070, gameplay will be affected in relation to the frames-per-second compared to the GTX 1080 at the same graphics settings and resolution, due to the lesser number of CUDA/rendering cores (despite the same 8GB VRAM) of the GTX 1070 (i.e., 2560 in the GTX 1080 vs 1920 in the GTX 1070). To match the same fps output, one must need to lower graphics settings and/or resolution to match the other.
    Reply to raisonjohn
  6. raisonjohn said:
    The two monitors you are comparing in your last post and which I also mentioned in the post before that (Dell S2417DG and AOC G2460PG) BOTH have G-Sync.

    It all boils down to preferred resolution.

    At 1440p, the CPU takes less of the load in communicating with the GPU in rendering frames. At 1080p, the CPU takes more of the load than the GPU. That was the point in the other thread. Though the Ryzen 5 1600 can also reach 144fps in certain scenarios at 1080p (depending on the graphics settings and the game itself), it is true that Intel CPUs (such as the i7-8700K) would be the best (but more expensive) option at that lower resolution esp. if your graphics settings are set to ultra/maxed out, due to the significantlly faster clock speeds of the Intel CPU.

    The i7-8700K, with 6C/12T at 3.7GHz to 4.7GHz clock speeds, and overclockable, may cost more than $360* (more than ~£270*) plus costs for a good aftermarket cooler (say about ~£60++) as the Intel CPU doesn't come with one. On the other hand, the Ryzen 5 1600, with 6C/12T at lower clock speeds of 3.2GHz to 3.6GHz, and also overclockable (can easily reach 4.0GHz on the included stock cooler), will only cost you ~£180.

    If we consider what was said on the thread on CPU-Monitor pairing: The 1440p/165Hz with G-Sync Dell S2417DG (at ~£470) can be paired with the Ryzen 5 1600 (~£180) for a total cost of ~£650. The 1080p/144Hz with G-Sync AOC G2460PG (at ~£350) can be paired with the i7-8700K (~£270*) + CPU cooler (~£60++) for a total cost of ~£680++. (*Note that the price of the i7-8700K is subjective and not retail pricing).

    The higher resolution monitor will produce much richer/smoother details than the lower resolution monitor due to pixel density (relative also to how far away your eyesight is from the screen, given the screen size).

    My choice would be the 1440p/165Hz monitor, provided you have sufficient budget for such.

    As for the GPU, both GTX 1080 G1 and GTX 1080 Windforce OC is made by the same manufacturer, Gigabyte. There are only two major differences between these models. They are:

    1) G1 version has a very slightly higher factory-set clock speeds of 1695GHz-1835GHz (default) and 1721MHz-1860MHz (OC-mode) while the Windforce OC has 1632MHz-1771MHz (default) and 1657MHz-1797MHz (OC-mode). Such difference is only miniscule, at only 63MHz-64MHz (that's only 0.064GHz). You can always manually overclock any of the two GPUs to higher clock speeds and match the other.

    2) G1 version has RGB lighting, while the Windforce OC does not.

    The rest of the features and performance is very similar to the other.

    If you consider getting the lesser-value (due to the pricing) GTX 1070, gameplay will be affected in relation to the frames-per-second compared to the GTX 1080 at the same graphics settings and resolution, due to the lesser number of CUDA/rendering cores (despite the same 8GB VRAM) of the GTX 1070 (i.e., 2560 in the GTX 1080 vs 1920 in the GTX 1070). To match the same fps output, one must need to lower graphics settings and/or resolution to match the other.


    Monitor:
    Since they both have G-Sync, would you suggest me to get the cheaper one or would you suggest me to get the one that fits the GTX 1080 the best and gives me the best gameplay?

    CPU:
    Since you said that the Ryzen 5 1600 with the monitor and no CPU Cooling costs about £650 and the i7-8600k with a CPU Cooler and the other necessary things would cost MIN £680 // Would that mean the max is about £750-£800. If it is about that, do you think it is really needed to go ahead and spend that much money or is it pointless? Would you suggest me to go choose the Ryzen 5 1600 instead?

    GPU:
    Since the GTX 1080 G1 and the Windforce had minor differences I will go ahead and choose the GTX 1080 Windforce.

    P.S: is it the i7-8700k // i7-8200k // i7-8600k? Which one is it?

    Here are all of my parts that I have combined with your suggestions.

    Parts:
    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor (£189.19 @ Amazon UK)

    Motherboard: MSI - B350 TOMAHAWK ATX AM4 Motherboard (£98.80 @ Alza)

    Memory: Team - Vulcan 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory (£119.50 @ Overclockers.co.uk)

    Storage: SanDisk - SSD PLUS 240GB 2.5" Solid State Drive (£74.99 @ Amazon UK)

    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive (£39.95 @ Aria PC)

    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1080 8GB G1 Gaming Video Card (£497.99 @ CCL Computers)

    Case: Corsair - SPEC-01 RED ATX Mid Tower Case (£49.10 @ PC World Business)

    Power Supply: SeaSonic - S12II 620W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply (£64.42 @ CCL Computers)

    Monitor: AOC - Q2778VQE 27.0" 2560x1440 60Hz Monitor (£209.99 @ Amazon UK)

    Total: £1375.28

    I am wondering which monitor is the best?

    Monitor 1: AOC - Q2778VQE 27.0" 2560x1440 60Hz Monitor
    Monitor 2:1440p/165Hz with G-Sync Dell S2417DG (at ~£470)
    Monitor 3:1080p/144Hz with G-Sync AOC G2460PG (at ~£350)
    Reply to Itz_TryFX
Ask a new question Answer

Read More

Gaming MSI-Microstar ATX Motherboards