Old motherboard unknown video comnector

Hello,
I just took out my motherboard from my old pc and i want to test it but i can't understand where is the video slot


My VGA cable wont fit in there so help would be appreciated thanks
Also does this old motherboard type have integrated gpu or i need one?
Reply to joelmappa
11 answers Last reply
More about motherboard unknown video comnector
  1. LoL, there's no IGP on that board.

    It's two serial ports, a parallel port and a game/MIDI connector
    Reply to BFG-9000
  2. How can i make it work then lol


    Found an old gpu but can't seem to connect it to the motherboard

    Reply to joelmappa
  3. You'll need an AGP or 32-bit PCI video card. And a CPU heatsink (most Socket A ones will fit if you can't find one for Socket 370). That brown slot is a universal AGP slot so your card should fit in there.

    Oh, and keep in mind neither Pentium III nor K7 Athlon chips have SSE2 so can't run things like Firefox, Chrome, Flash, or Office 2013

    Those port colors have been standardized for 18 years as PC99, in case you were wondering.
    Reply to BFG-9000
  4. LoL what can i do with it?
    i also saw there is no lan slot,you cannot access the internet?
    What can u do on this pc?
    Reply to joelmappa
  5. Forgive me but it has been a while since I saw the AGP stuff so please correct me if I am wrong.

    It looks like the graphics card slot is the AGP type (Brown used to be the standard colour I think) and that looks like an AGP card so it should fit in that brown slot. I thought the L piece on the card (Near your index finger in the photo) fit inside a clip to hold the card but your AGP slot doesnt have it. Basically the length of the metal strip elements should fit in the brown slot and the L part will overhang.

    Have you tried the card in the brown slot and if so why would it not fit?
    Reply to PistolPaul
  6. When that motherboard was new, 10/100Mbit ethernet was less than 5 years old and still expensive, so there is no way they would've included such a NIC and at best you would've got a 10BT or 10BASE5 onboard (10Gbit ethernet has been available for 10 years now and you don't see them included on too many new boards yet). The serial ports are there for you to hook up an external modem to dial-up to AOL and access the internet that way (hey it was 1999).

    If you've got to get a NIC anyway, get a dual-port one and you'd be able to use it as a router, booting off a floppy or CompactFlash card. It has enough CPU power to rout 100Mbps WAN service and doesn't really use much more electricity than many modern routers. Heck I've got routers that came with a 60w power brick!

    While it does have USB 2.0, using limited CPU power to poll a USB WiFi device sounds like a bad idea. This was an era when hardware accelerated sound cards could reduce the load on the CPU (a feature which was made impossible with Windows Vista except in OpenAL).

    And yes, not all AGP slots had the latch. Without it the little L-piece just stays outside of the slot. BTW that looks like an Aopen MX34 board in case you wanted to look at the manual.
    Reply to BFG-9000
  7. Judging by the state of of your motherboard's I/O ports in the screenshot I'd say it's well past it's sell by date and not worth spending any money on, especially as it's also several generations old and therefore obsolete.
    Reply to Phillip Corcoran
  8. Nope didnt work i got no display.The motherboard led turned on but no display.Perhaps the AGP is broken :(
    Reply to joelmappa
  9. It could be the card is AGP 3.0 (8x) and requires 0.8v signalling, although it does have both 1.5v and 3.3v notches so should work at 1.5v. There were some compatibility issues though.

    Your board's 4x Universal AGP slot only works with 3.3v (AGP 1.0) or 1.5v (AGP 2.0) capable cards.

    VIA chipset boards also weren't compatible with nVidia TNT2 and GeForce 1 cards, likely due to the GART AGP driver in those horrible 4-in-1 driver sets. That's why it was safest to use cards that don't use AGP features at all such as 3DFx. It was a huge advance when the Northbridge was moved onto the CPU--all of the compatibility issues of 3rd party chipsets went away.
    Reply to BFG-9000
  10. BFG-9000 said:
    It could be the card is AGP 3.0 (8x) and requires 0.8v signalling, although it does have both 1.5v and 3.3v notches so should work at 1.5v. There were some compatibility issues though.

    Your board's 4x Universal AGP slot only works with 3.3v (AGP 1.0) or 1.5v (AGP 2.0) capable cards.

    VIA chipset boards also weren't compatible with nVidia TNT2 and GeForce 1 cards, likely due to the GART AGP driver in those horrible 4-in-1 driver sets. That's why it was safest to use cards that don't use AGP features at all such as 3DFx. It was a huge advance when the Northbridge was moved onto the CPU--all of the compatibility issues of 3rd party chipsets went away.

    o_o
    which means i need a 3dfx gpu?
    Reply to joelmappa
  11. It means a 3DFx GPU is least likely to cause problems. They were also available in PCI as were much newer cards like the GeForce 6200.
    Reply to BFG-9000
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