Inverse Voltage/Load relationship

So, I've got a super old i7 930 CPU on a GA-x58A-UD3R-rev. 2 system and I'm looking to eek out what little performance I can til I can upgrade to a ryzen system. I've got it at a stable overclock of 3.71GHz at 1.264v. I don't think it's a fantastic overclocker because that seems an awfully high voltage for that frequency, but whatever. My question is that my voltage doesn't stay constant, and even weirder is that when running prime95, my vCore drops about .01v and when I stop the test to start the max temp small FFT test, my vCore jumps back up again. So there seems to be an inverse relationship between Load and the vCore. How does this work? Am I doing something wrong? I'm too lazy at the moment to type out all the BIOS settings but if it'll help answer the question I'll do whatever. Thanks in advance.

PS: My temps and voltages are being monitored in Open Hardware Monitor.
Reply to Julian_vdM
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More about inverse voltage load relationship
  1. It is quite normal for the Vcore to drop a bit under load, specially if you are using a lower quality PSU.
    Reply to Kasper Jorgensen
  2. Julian_vdM said:
    So, I've got a super old i7 930 CPU on a GA-x58A-UD3R-rev. 2 system and I'm looking to eek out what little performance I can til I can upgrade to a ryzen system. I've got it at a stable overclock of 3.71GHz at 1.264v. I don't think it's a fantastic overclocker because that seems an awfully high voltage for that frequency, but whatever. My question is that my voltage doesn't stay constant, and even weirder is that when running prime95, my vCore drops about .01v and when I stop the test to start the max temp small FFT test, my vCore jumps back up again. So there seems to be an inverse relationship between Load and the vCore. How does this work? Am I doing something wrong? I'm too lazy at the moment to type out all the BIOS settings but if it'll help answer the question I'll do whatever. Thanks in advance.

    PS: My temps and voltages are being monitored in Open Hardware Monitor.


    That's vdroop. Completely normal. LLC can counteract droop, but with only .01v loss, that's actually pretty good.
    Reply to Vellinious
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