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First Build, Can I Overclock Well? (Need Advice)

I've finally made the decision to switch to pc, but I'm not too experienced with PC's. I'm needing to run games like Rainbow Six Siege, GTA V, Rocket League, and Battlefield 1 at 60+ FPS on a 1080p 144hz monitor on High-Max settings. How well will this do the job? My budget is around $900, willing to go a little higher than that, but if I'm planning to buy this around Christmas I could probably get many of these parts for a bit cheaper. I've created an Intel and AMD build. Which is better?

My AMD Build: https://pcpartpicker.com/user/TD_Falcon/saved/qTMpbv

My Intel Build: https://pcpartpicker.com/user/TD_Falcon/saved/#view=KQWXHx

-_-_-Questions-_-_-
How well will I be able to OC? Will I need a better CPU cooler or more case fans?

Is there any way I can use a Micro ATX mobo (to save money I can out into GPU) and still sufficiently OC?

Is there any way I can save money, rather than buying the same part for a higher price?

Is my intel or AMD build better (Solely for gaming)? Sorry if I start an uproar.

Thanks for reading and helping :D
Reply to sessoms.will
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  1. PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($197.19 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: MSI - B350 PC MATE ATX AM4 Motherboard ($71.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: GeIL - EVO X 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($135.88 @ OutletPC)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($45.87 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: EVGA - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB SC GAMING ACX 3.0 Black Edition Video Card ($404.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: Deepcool - TESSERACT SW RED ATX Mid Tower Case ($39.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Power Supply: SeaSonic - S12II 520W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($39.99 @ SuperBiiz)
    Total: $935.88
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-09-08 22:28 EDT-0400

    Should beat both builds, the stock cooler can oc some, will need to add a SSD later. But a 128gb SSD wasn't enough to do much anyway.


    On the Intel side a 7600k almost never makes sense, it's so much more expensive than a 1600 build that it kills the budget. By Christmas the 6core i5s will be out so their price will determine which makes more sense then
    Reply to Supahos
  2. Best answer
    Don't be alarmed by the price this shows, because by Christmas they will come down, especially the GTX 1070's price - it's heavily overpriced right now due to mining.

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: AMD - Ryzen 5 1600 3.2GHz 6-Core Processor ($197.19 @ SuperBiiz)
    Motherboard: Asus - PRIME B350-PLUS ATX AM4 Motherboard ($91.98 @ Newegg)
    Memory: Team - Vulcan 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-3000 Memory ($134.99 @ Newegg)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($45.87 @ OutletPC)
    Video Card: Gigabyte - GeForce GTX 1070 8GB Windforce OC Video Card ($454.98 @ Newegg)
    Case: NZXT - S340 (Black) ATX Mid Tower Case ($79.89 @ B&H)
    Power Supply: Corsair - CX (2017) 550W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($49.99 @ Amazon)
    Total: $1054.89
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-09-08 22:39 EDT-0400

    Case is a personal choice, pick what you like. When you buy it, if budget allows, add an SSD as well - a 200-275 GB is usually recommended, so that you can keep a few games along with Windows and apps on it. If that feels too expensive, get a 120-130 GB one and store just Windows and apps on it, it won't hold games.

    Edit 1: As for Intel, avoid the 7th gen products now, even the i7's. If you want Intel, wait for the 8th gen, it is rumored to have major upgrades, something Intel hasn't done for a long time now. 4 cores are a thing of the past, and with Intel's 8th gen, that will get validated even further.
    1. The stock cooler that comes with the R5 1600 will allow for OC up to 3.7, maybe 3.8 GHz. Nothing over that without aftermarket cooling.
    2. There are micro-ATX B350 boards, like the MSI Gaming Pro B350M.
    3. You can save money by waiting for the GTX 1070 to come down to normal prices. Its price is inflated right now due to mining, hopefully by the time Christmas comes the issue will be over.
    4. Now that's a topic deserving a thread of its own. The short version is this - Intel is better for high refresh rate gaming, i.e, 144+ Hz. AMD is better for long-term usage, at least right now. Since you're looking for a 60+ Hz experience, I'd still say AMD is better, even with a 144 Hz monitor. This stays true until Intel's Coffee Lake 8th gen CPUs are launched, and do have the rumored 6-core 12-thread i7's. In that case, I'd probably recommend going for the 8th gen i7's. If they do come out by Christmas, I'd suggest asking for suggestions then, but I think they'll be the better deal for 144 Hz gaming.
    But that's the future, can't say much about it right now since it's all just speculation. Right now, Ryzen's the deal. Whether it stays so till Christmas is something that depends on Coffee Lake's launch date.
    Reply to Shektron
  3. I was thinking of using the 128GB SSD to download Windows onto and wiping my 1 TB HDD I use for my XB1 and mounting it. Also, having trouble finding a mobo that supports DDR4 3000, but if I can find cheap mobo that supports it the I definitely will opt for it. Thanks for the help, though. Will try to opt for a 1070 if there's any way it'll fit my budget.
    Reply to sessoms.will
  4. sessoms.will said:
    I was thinking of using the 128GB SSD to download Windows onto and wiping my 1 TB HDD I use for my XB1 and mounting it. Also, having trouble finding a mobo that supports DDR4 3000, but if I can find cheap mobo that supports it the I definitely will opt for it. Thanks for the help, though. Will try to opt for a 1070 if there's any way it'll fit my budget.


    I don't know whether you can use an Xbox One hard drive on PC or not - you can use the external ones, but I don't know about the internal ones. If you know how to do it, then you can do that.

    As for the RAM, DDR4 2666 is fine, there's not much benefit in games from DDR4-3000 or even DDR4-3200. Stick to 2666 Mhz, all motherboards support that.
    Reply to Shektron
  5. Oh, okay. Yeah, I'm most likely going to wait for the i8's if they're available. Is it appropriate to look at past GPU prices before the mining spike as a gauge for future prices? VERY helpful, thank you
    Reply to sessoms.will
  6. sessoms.will said:
    Oh, okay. Yeah, I'm most likely going to wait for the i8's if they're available. Is it appropriate to look at past GPU prices before the mining spike as a gauge for future prices? VERY helpful, thank you


    Okay firstly, the 8th gen isn't called i8 - they're called 8th gen i7's, or Coffee Lake in general. There's nothing like an i8(be thankful you didn't say this in front of a hyperactive PC enthusiast, they would have mocked you for life).

    Secondly, it might be a good measure to just look at the MSRP of the card you want to purchase, and add anywhere form $10 to $50 to the MSRP for the aftermarket cards. Companies charge extra for their superior cooler designs, hence the extra cost over the MSRP of the cards. Looking at prices before the mining craze could be a good indicator, though not fully accurate of course.
    Reply to Shektron
  7. Yeah, it's an external one. It's compatible with PC. I just have to take the cover off and it's mountable. As for the ram, that's good. I'm fine with cheaper RAM as long as it does what it needs to.
    Reply to sessoms.will
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