RIP MoBo? PC just shut off after overvolting.

I was having a lot of instability issues with my old pc. It is rocking:

MoBo: MSI 880GMA-E55
CPU: AMD Phenom II X6 1090T
GPU: GeForce GTX 750ti
RAM: 8GB Kingston (1333MHz)
HDD: WD Blue (1TB) - Storage, Hitachi (60GB) - System
PSU: 500W (came with the pc so probably reliable?)
Cooling: Corsair H50i

The system was unstable even without any overclocking, getting CLOCK_WATCHDOG_TIMEOUT BSOD frequently. So my first idea was to underclock my CPU, since the BSOD is driver or CPU related. 300MHz under and still BSODs. So next I decided to overvolt the CPU, I mean I have very beefy cooling on the proccessor, so why not try it. So I launch HW monitor and CPU-Z to monitor the temps and voltage and start increasing it by increments of 0.01. I don't exactly remember the starting voltage, but it was about 1.18V. Slowly adding 0.01 and looking at the temps I saw barely any increases and so decided to finish on a round 1.30V, because temps were at around 55 degrees (Celcius). This was all done while the CPU was under 100% load. There were no immediate crashes or BSODs. So I left it running for a few more minutes, when suddenly the system completely shut off and a subtle (very weak) smell of burned plastic filled the room (very small room). I first tried to turn on the pc again, hoping to get to the BIOS and lowering the voltage, but the pc did not turn on, with the power LED turning on and then quickly off. So I took out the CMOS battery and waited for 10 seconds, then putting it back in and trying to turn on the PC again, still the same blink of power and then nothing.

So far all I did was test the power supply, which jump started fine, so it's not dead. Took out the graphics card, didn't launch either. Don't have another CPU or MoBo to try out, but I don't think the CPU is dead, because it never went above 55 degrees.
Reply to gime114
4 answers Last reply
More about rip mobo shut overvolting
  1. Why not try it ??

    Mainly because overvolting plays heavily on the boards vrm setup & by the look of it that old MSI is a fairly skanky quality 3+1 phase & would be struggling anyway with a 125w CPU


    MSI were not a good manufacturer to rely on with amd boards before 2013 - they really did make some dire quality stuff.
    Reply to madmatt30
  2. madmatt30 said:
    Why not try it ??

    Mainly because overvolting plays heavily on the boards vrm setup & by the look of it that old MSI is a fairly skanky quality 3+1 phase & would be struggling anyway with a 125w CPU


    MSI were not a good manufacturer to rely on with amd boards before 2013 - they really did make some dire quality stuff.


    So should I look into getting a new motherboard for the computer? If so maybe you have some suggestions for a reliable one, because I was looking into these 2, because they're fairly recent (late 2015 and early 2016):
    https://www.msi.com/Motherboard/970-GAMING.html#hero-overview
    http://www.asrock.com/mb/AMD/Fatal1ty%20970%20Performance3.1/#Specification
    and also noticed a sale for this one, a bit older:
    https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/GA-970A-DS3P-rev-10#ov

    P.S. by recent and older I mean the support for the motherboards, because I don't exactly expect brand new mobos coming out for a very old socket.
    Reply to gime114
  3. The ds3p is fine for that cpu & should be the cheapest by a long long way ???
    Reply to madmatt30
  4. It's not exactly much cheaper, especially when compared with the MSI board (only 20$ less), but it's definitely cheaper than ASRock (by 70$).

    If looking at lowest price then this MoBo is the cheapest from the most popular ones:
    http://www.asrock.com/mb/NVIDIA/N68-GS4%20FX%20R2.0/
    I do not need SLI/Crossfire, because as I mentioned this is my old pc and I won't be using it that much, so maybe this is the best option? It is less that 50$ by the way.
    Reply to gime114
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