I5 7600k OC @4.8 ghz voltage too low?

I overclocked my CPU (i5 7600k) to 4.8ghz at 1.2v how can i know if the voltage is too low, what are signs of low voltage.
Also, i wonder if my TOP case fan should be installed in the front or back slot ( as i only have one ON THE TOP OF THE CASE)
Reply to leclerc_maxime
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More about 7600k ghz voltage low
  1. leclerc_maxime said:
    I overclocked my CPU (i5 7600k) to 4.8ghz at 1.2v how can i know if the voltage is too low, what are signs of low voltage.
    Also, i wonder if my TOP case fan should be installed in the front or back slot ( as i only have one ON THE TOP OF THE CASE)


    use stress test and if its crash then its a sign
    Reply to nitinvaid20
  2. Run RoG Real Bench for 2 hours using HWiNFO to monitor temps and voltages. If you pass, you should be fine. I have had 24 hour P95 OCs fail in < 2 hours under RB.

    Kaby Lake Statistics

    Average OC = 5.03
    Median OC = 5.00

    Average Vcore = 1.35
    Median Vcore = 1.36

    Here's the ones from 4.7 to 4.9 in that sampling ... if you are stable at 1.2, that would be best in that sampling

    Core Freq. / Cache Freq. / Vcore

    4.9 4.6 1.32
    4.9 4.5 1.28
    4.9 4.5 1.3
    4.9 4.5 1.3


    http://rog.asus.com/forum/showthread.php?43233-Realbench-v2-Discussion-Thread-Download-Links
    http://www.hwinfo.com/download.php

    When you open Real Bench, move both windows to left side of screen. Open HWiNFO64, run "sensors only", you will get a pop up asking whether to disable reading such as the "Asus EC chip", click "Disable this sensor". Move the HWiNFO64 window to upper right hand corner of screen. Stretch bottom of window to full screen height. Then run test

    4.9 4.2 1.3
    4.9 4.2 1.31
    4.8 4.5 1.28
    4.8 4.2 1.23
    4.8 4.2 1.24
    4.72 4.72 1.41
    4.7 4.4 1.31
    4.7 4.2 1.24
    4.7 4.2 1.235


    As to the fan, can't answer the question w/o knowing the rest of the fan mounts. You want to have more fans blowing in than blowing out.... 3 fans in and 2 out provides a nice equilibrium because intake fans will have impaired flow due to inlet filters. These work very well

    2 in / 1 fan out
    3 in / 2 fan out

    The top has a lot of room and folks tend to be inclined to make these exhaust as we all learned in 8th grade that hot air rises. Well no it doesn't ... at least not when faced with a fan.

    A common case design is 2 front, 1 rear and 3 top. If we follow the hot air rises logic, then we have:

    2 Fans blowing in with as much as 1/3 of that air flow blocked by a dusty air filter ... 1.33 fans worth of air.

    4 fans blowing out unrestricted..... 4.00 / 1.33 means that you have 3 times more air blowing out than in. That is a big negative case pressure situation to which many will point out the dust problem. That's not the more significant of the problems created by this situation.

    The bigger problem is not the dust being carried in thru the rear grilles and vented slot covers, it's all the hot exhaust from the GPU and PSU that is carrying it in.

    So if ya have the above case:

    1 fan, then put in front as an intake
    2 fans, then put in front as intakes
    2 fans, then put 2 in front as intakes and 1 rear exhaust
    Reply to JackNaylorPE
  3. I like to run XTU CPU stress test. It is by Intel and it will monitor your hardware as well. You can use Prime 95, it will really push your CPU hard and the temps are not real world comparisons because nothing is as tough as Prime 95.

    Signs of low voltage is a blue screen or crash. Getting 4.8ghz at 1.2 volts will be a very good OC and you should not have to worry about temps. I would think you will not have an issue hitting 5ghz with adequate cooling.

    As far as your fans are concerned. Most cases come with 2 or 3. Start with what they have and go from there. If your system is warmer than you like, add some more fans.
    Reply to feelinfroggy777
  4. Two problems w/ P95

    1. P95 (current versions can damage the CPU due to voltage boost when AVX and other modern instruction sets are present).

    2. Older versions do not have modern instruction sets so all you have proved is that your system is stable as long as you don't run modern programs. This is one of the reasons why 24 hour stable P95 Ocs fail under application based multitasking type benchmarks .

    RB uses real applications in a multitasking environment... in other words... real situations. You can be Furmark stable and fail in real games; so while Furmark is great for testing cooling system capability, it's not the "real deal" and that's why we have Furmark stable OCs failing playing real games. The same is true with CPU, synthetic stable CPU OCs do fail in multitasking environments using real applications. Its like testing the 4WD weather and off road ability of your SUV by driving 90 mph down a Florida highway.
    Reply to JackNaylorPE
  5. I have just tested prime 95 for 5mins and my temps are at 83c at 1.2v am i good to go?
    Reply to leclerc_maxime
  6. leclerc_maxime said:
    I have just tested prime 95 for 5mins and my temps are at 83c at 1.2v am i good to go?


    5 minutes? No...that's not good. Use Realbench and stability test for a minimum of an hour. 2 would be better, as JackNaylor suggested.
    Reply to Vellinious
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