Ryzen 5 1600 now, or wait for i5 8600k?

I once asked if the 7600k or the Ryzen 5 would be better for gaming, and even though the i5 would have been slightly better for my purposes I decided on the Ryzen for the future value of it's extra cores and threads.

But now the 6 core, 6 thread 8600k Coffee Lake looms and I'm back to wondering which is going to better for me.

Going by the specs available, the 8600k is going to be significantly better than the Ryzen 5 1600 isn't it?
Reply to Netherspark
8 answers Last reply
More about ryzen 1600 wait 8600k
  1. don't think so, it's a 6c/6t since they disable the hyperthreading.

    but, we can't say much till they give us some price to compare about, and it's going to be pretty hard for them:
    pricing too low: cannibalizing the kabylake
    pricing too high: people will go with Ryzen instead
    whichever path they go, here's one thing that i heard bout: they said that 8th gen will need new socket
    Reply to constantine_99
  2. The price is going to be pretty much the same as the 7600k. Close enough to the Ryzen 5 to be negligible (at least to me).

    I know the Coffee Lake will need a new motherboard, but I'll need to buy a new one no matter what I do. Prices are pretty much irrelevent in this decision, as I'd be spending near enough the same amount of money anyway.
    Reply to Netherspark
  3. For just gaming, i5 8600k will probably better.
    Reply to rgd1101
  4. if you can then wait for the i5 to come out to see how it stacks up against ryzen 5. intel still has the better quality cores then AMD currently. ryzen is good but they are currently leading intel only because they have more cores then kaby and skylake which coffelake aims to correct
    Reply to captaincharisma
  5. constantine_99 said:
    don't think so, it's a 6c/6t since they disable the hyperthreading.

    but, we can't say much till they give us some price to compare about, and it's going to be pretty hard for them:
    pricing too low: cannibalizing the kabylake
    pricing too high: people will go with Ryzen instead
    whichever path they go, here's one thing that i heard bout: they said that 8th gen will need new socket


    Some prices have leaked. PRICES ARE IN CANADIAN.
    INTEL BOXED 8TH GEN INTEL I7-8700K PROCESSOR [BX80684I78700K]: $484.44 So $384 USD
    INTEL BOXED 8TH GEN INTEL I7-8700 PROCESSOR [BX80684I78700]: $407.73 So $323 USD
    INTEL BOXED 8TH GEN INTEL I5-8600K PROCESSOR [BX80684I58600K]: $338.00 So $268 USD
    INTEL BOXED 8TH GEN INTEL I5-8400 PROCESSOR [BX80684I58400]: $237.58 So $188 USD
    INTEL BOXED 8TH GEN INTEL I3-8350K PROCESSOR [BX80684I38350K]: $233.41 So $185 USD
    INTEL BOXED 8TH GEN INTEL I3-8100 PROCESSOR [BX80684I38100]: $152.51 So $120 USD
    Reply to gasaraki
  6. intel still wins in term of single core speed, but i would still get the R5 1600 since it's already uses hyperthreading and still cheaper since it comes with cooler too
    motherboard price for AMD also comes cheaper
    in terms of price/performance, i'll say Ryzen still wins
    but raw performance? Intel still came out on top (especially since the 8th gen offers more cores too)
    Reply to constantine_99
  7. It all comes down to two things:
    1.) What is the primary thing you will do with your computer?
    2.) How much money do you have to spend?

    Ryzen gives more for your dollar and is available now.

    If you want a gaming solution Ryzen trades blows with Intel's i7 7700K, depending upon how many cores a game will use. Very few games use more than eight threads. One important factor is that even if the FPS is SLIGHTLY lower using Ryzen in some modern CPU demanding games those specific games have proven to look less choppy with the Ryzen over the i7 7700K.

    Intel's next generation solution will cost more than AMD and the Intel CPU speed will be reduced in an effort to keep heat lower, so, FPS in some games will be lower compared to a faster Intel 4 core 4 thread, just like the Ryzen CPU.

    Also, AMD CPUs have the die soldered to the IHS, Intel still uses a not so good thermal transfering TIM between the CPU die and integrated heat sink, also, the compound used to secure the IHS to the CPU die does not fully compress which leaves a wider gap between the die and IHS - which, again, increases CPU temperature.

    I have an overclocked Intel i7 7700K, and unless you delid it and apply liquid metal they get extremely hot with slight overclocks, and most stay toasty even if you do not overclock. And, you have to purchase your own CPU cooler with the high end Intel CPUs. The coolers that come with the lower clock CPUs are much too small and barely do the job and a third party cooler is suggested for those CPUs.

    The bad things that can be said against Intel is long. One of the bizarre things is Intel told people not to overclock their i7 7700K CPUs, even though they were designed to be overclocked - overclocking was the very thing people bought them. So, for safe overclocking the CPU needs delidded, liquid metal properly applied, purchase a good air cooler [like a Noctua NH-U14S or NH-12S] and have good case cooling. - That is a lot of requisites. - AMD, on the other hand, buy your parts, build the computer - job done.
    Reply to Danra
  8. Ryzen has hyperthreading which is a huge plus, at least for any task that can use the 12 threads.

    Reality of the matter though is until we have coffee lake CPUs in hand we cant really put them against each other to test. We can speculate that the i5 will have better per core performance.

    Ryzen 5 is a great CPU and if you want a system now then go for it, if you can wait it out then go ahead and make a more informed decision.
    With these things though it is necessary to set a buy point because otherwise you will always be waiting 6 months to see how it stacks up against the next new thing.
    Reply to boosted1g
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