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Throttlestop 8.48 on HP Z400.

Hello Guys,

I have bought HP Z400 machine it sports an intel Xeon W3680 @ which i am pretty sure has an unlocked multiplier. Now when try to overclock it using throttlestop 8.48 the multiplier slider does not go above x26, why is this, am i doing something horribly wrong.

BTW i have also tried Intel Xtreme Tuning Utility and it does not even show anything on Advance Tuning at all. (where i believe lies the sliders to overclock a CPU)

But this guy has done it using Dell mobo and intel XTU(video :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2EKs02I3Oc )

Please help me to overclock this CPU.

Thanks
18 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about throttlestop z400
  1. I have a Z400 that i haven't tried to overclock, but I wouldn't do so either... OEM tent to be very skimpy on PSUs and MoBos, the two most important components for overclocking a CPU.
  2. A lot of this is uncharted territiory. I have put your question to the Developer of TS to see what he thinks. The Extreme series CPUs respond. The unlocked Xeons are an experiment at this time. Can you raise Voltage?
    Aftermarket PSUs fit. heatsinking the VRM MOSFETs can make abig difference also.
    Here's how my OEM MB runs.
    http://valid.x86.fr/top-cpu/496e74656c28522920436f726528544d29322045787472656d652043505520513638303020204020322e393347487a
  3. The default multiplier for a Xeon W3680 is 25. When using ThrottleStop on these CPUs, you need to adjust the Set Multiplier value to the default multiplier value + 1. That tells the CPU to deliver maximum turbo boost. 25 + 1 = 26 so that is why ThrottleStop Set Multiplier tops out at that value.

    If your CPU is unlocked, you should be able to open up the Turbo Power Limits (TPL) window in ThrottleStop and adjust your turbo limits higher. This is how you overclock the early Core i CPUs. I do not know if the W3680 is unlocked. Even if it is unlocked, it is still possible that an individual manufacturer has set a lock bit in the bios to prevent overclocking. If this is the case, you will not be able to overclock this CPU without using a modified bios which likely does not exist for your HP motherboard.

    Post some pics of the TPL window. Are the adjusters in that window locked? ThrottleStop checks for the lock bit so this should tell you if you are going to be able to overclock or not.
  4. william p said:
    A lot of this is uncharted territiory. I have put your question to the Developer of TS to see what he thinks. The Extreme series CPUs respond. The unlocked Xeons are an experiment at this time. Can you raise Voltage?
    Aftermarket PSUs fit. heatsinking the VRM MOSFETs can make abig difference also.
    Here's how my OEM MB runs.
    http://valid.x86.fr/top-cpu/496e74656c28522920436f726528544d29322045787472656d652043505520513638303020204020322e393347487a

    Thanks man, i have learned alot about throttle stop from the link
  5. unclewebb said:
    The default multiplier for a Xeon W3680 is 25. When using ThrottleStop on these CPUs, you need to adjust the Set Multiplier value to the default multiplier value + 1. That tells the CPU to deliver maximum turbo boost. 25 + 1 = 26 so that is why ThrottleStop Set Multiplier tops out at that value.

    If your CPU is unlocked, you should be able to open up the Turbo Power Limits (TPL) window in ThrottleStop and adjust your turbo limits higher. This is how you overclock the early Core i CPUs. I do not know if the W3680 is unlocked. Even if it is unlocked, it is still possible that an individual manufacturer has set a lock bit in the bios to prevent overclocking. If this is the case, you will not be able to overclock this CPU without using a modified bios which likely does not exist for your HP motherboard.

    Post some pics of the TPL window. Are the adjusters in that window locked? ThrottleStop checks for the lock bit so this should tell you if you are going to be able to overclock or not.


    Yes i can open TPL tab and adjust TDP and TDA but i havent tried doing it.. But what i did is just increased the multiplier in TRL (Turbo Ratio Limit) for every core individually (as can be seen in image1)..
    image1 = https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-CUhDX05IWnUXFkRUpTQnpIQzg

    Now when i set the multiplier using TRL to 32 on all individual core PC crashed, it is maybe due to low voltage as i can not increase voltage refer to image1, why is that..

    BTW can i increase TDP in TPL so as to compensate for low voltage..
    And what is TDC is it current?

    PS here is the image of TPL window (https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-CUhDX05IWncUtXSmNiUHRGZzg)
  6. The first gen Core i CPUs do not have access to software voltage control. If there is not a voltage option in the bios then you are out of luck. Overclocking the multiplier will allow the voltage to increase automatically but this is not an ideal solution. At some point you are either going to end up with too much voltage and too much heat or not enough voltage and your CPU will crash.

    Can you post a screenshot of ThrottleStop while using a 30 or 31 multiplier? Put a load on the CPU like a few threads of the built in TS Bench test. Maybe include CPU-Z in your screenshot just to confirm.

    You only need to raise the power limits if your CPU is throttling while fully loaded. If your CPU is trying to go beyond 130 Watts or 110 Amps while running a stress test like Prime95, it will automatically reduce the CPU multiplier just enough to maintain power consumption just a hair under these limits. If you run into this problem, raising either or both of these power limits should allow your CPU to run at full speed. The only limitation is more MHz = more voltage = more heat.
  7. I have the version 2 Z400 (6 DIMM slots) and a W3680. The latest version of the BIOS is 3.60 and available from HP. I can confirm that ThrottleStop 8.50 does indeed allow the multiplier to to 45. I run all 6 cores at 31x. If set the multi to 32 and stress the machine the system will crash without a blue screen. It just shuts off much like my Sager laptop did when I exceeded the 240w PSU.

    I can also adjust TDP and TCD to whatever I like.

    I am wondering if a better power supply will help? I am aware that the 24 pin connector will need some modifications to work. I have a 24 pin extension cable on the way so I can modify that and not mess up the one on my EVGA 600w PSU.
  8. Best answer
    You should try putting heatsinks on the VRM MOSFETs. OEM machines usually don't have this to cut costs. The limit your seeing is probably what the MB can produce. It wasn't designed for overclocking so you may have to coax a little more out of it. Airflow over the VRM area is important also. I don't know about HP but the 24 pin on that era of Dells was normal. You can chop up some old GPU heatsinks to make these, or you can buy them. 2 sided thermal tape is used, or Arctic makes a 2 part epoxy. Some people use superglue because of the thin layer. I haven't tried it myself.
    I've used Enzotech. They're a little expensive, but I'm posting a link so you can see what it is I'm talking about.
    http://www.enzotechnology.com/air_cooling.htm
  9. william p said:
    You should try putting heatsinks on the VRM MOSFETs. OEM machines usually don't have this to cut costs. The limit your seeing is probably what the MB can produce. It wasn't designed for overclocking so you may have to coax a little more out of it. Airflow over the VRM area is important also. I don't know about HP but the 24 pin on that era of Dells was normal. You can chop up some old GPU heatsinks to make these, or you can buy them. 2 sided thermal tape is used, or Arctic makes a 2 part epoxy. Some people use superglue because of the thin layer. I haven't tried it myself.


    I received my ATX to HP PSU adapter a couple of days ago, installed an EVGA 600w PSU, same result. I will keep the EVGA because it has more than a single 6-pin PCIe connector.

    I will see about getting some heatsinks for the MOFSETS. Thanks for the response.

    Quite frankly, if I had known I could have bought an old server, plopped in a different CPU and a PSU I would have never built my 7700K system. For what I do it is extreme overkill. Now I just enjoy playing with these old systems. Kind of like tinkering with old cars I guess.
  10. I just added a link in the previous post.
  11. Could you do me a favor and run your computer at userbenchmark.com so others can see the potential that system actually has.
    http://www.userbenchmark.com/?redirFrom=userbenchmark.com&
    You might be the first one to try this on that system. There are already a Dell Precision T3400, Dimension E520's (DM061), and a Precision T3500 running overclocked there.
    Unless of course this one is yours.
    http://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/6938795
    Also have you upgraded the CPU cooler? The CPU will throttle whenever temps. get too high. As long as temps. are under control it will let you go higher.
    When you're adding Voltage, and increasing multiplier at the same time heat output in Watts increases exponentially. So for a good overclock you need cooling first, then Voltage (or current), and then multiplier in that order. How far you get depends on what runs out first. Cooling, Power, or CPU.
    http://hwbot.org/hardware/processor/xeon_w3680/
  12. william p said:
    Could you do me a favor and run your computer at userbenchmark.com so others can see the potential that system actually has.
    http://www.userbenchmark.com/?redirFrom=userbenchmark.com&
    You might be the first one to try this on that system. There are already a Dell Precision T3400, Dimension E520's (DM061), and a Precision T3500 running overclocked there.
    Unless of course this one is yours.
    http://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/6938795
    Also have you upgraded the CPU cooler? The CPU will throttle whenever temps. get too high. As long as temps. are under control it will let you go higher.
    When you're adding Voltage, and increasing multiplier at the same time heat output in Watts increases exponentially. So for a good overclock you need cooling first, then Voltage (or current), and then multiplier in that order. How far you get depends on what runs out first. Cooling, Power, or CPU.
    http://hwbot.org/hardware/processor/xeon_w3680/


    These are my first runs with this system, at your request. I do not have an SSD in it yet. I am using a 750GB laptop HDD. :D

    I cannot add voltage to the CPU as there is no way to do it. Temps are below 70c on all tests. I have the stock HP High Performance cooler (made by Cool Master). My other Z400 came with the standard cooler. I put a jumper between pins 1 and 5 to make the mobo think the HiPo cooler was installed. I never go above mid 70s on that one, so I think it's OK to do this.

    First I ran with the PNY GTX 780, then my Aorus GTX 1080 Ti. In my previous testing with X58 boards where I was able to get the X5670 up to 4.2+ GHz I saw roughly a 15% performance loss in games like BF1, WoW, PUBG, etc. vs. my 7700K @5GHz. These results are about what I expected. This X3680 turbos up to 4.1 GHz. I have another HZ400 with a W3680 that will only do 3.8GHz, so YMMV. I have included my 7700K w/ GTX 1080 Ti for reference.

    There are MANY people who would balk at putting an $800 graphics card in a used $100 server from eBay. I don't care about any of that. If I had known better I would have backed way off my PC build and done something like this. OEM server with a few minor upgrades and the 1070 or 1080 Ti. Having said that, the 1060 is really the sweet spot for this type of combo. If you get one with a single 6-pin PCIe power port there would be zero need to upgraded the PSU which would increase the value of this system. I would totally do a 1060 in one of these for 1080p gaming and be happy.

    HP Z400 with W3680/24GB DDR3-1066 RAM (6x 4GB) and GTX 780
    http://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/7053328

    HP Z400 with W3680/24GB DDR3-1066 RAM (6x 4GB) and GTX 1080 Ti
    http://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/7053914

    7700K @ 5.0GHz/16GB DDR4-2400 and GTX 1080 Ti
    http://www.userbenchmark.com/UserRun/7053123

    P.S.
    The RAM in the Z400 is DDR3-1600 but runs at 1066 in triple channel mode with all 6 slots populated. It runs at 1333 in dual channel mode with only 4 slots populated.

    I have some Registered ECC RAM on the way. I am hoping that 24GB (6x 4GB) will be able to run at DDR3-1333 with that installed. I will update as soon as I find out, assuming Registered ECC will work in this system. I have read mixed results on that.
  13. In the Dells the X58 supports 48GB RAM. Since the memory controller is actually on the CPU I think the HP could be the same. I'm thinking ECC is OK but Registered could be a problem. Maybe HP is different.
    It looks like you've seriously raised the bar for that system.
    http://www.userbenchmark.com/System/HP-Z400-Workstation/67
  14. william p said:
    In the Dells the X58 supports 48GB RAM. Since the memory controller is actually on the CPU I think the HP could be the same. I'm thinking ECC is OK but Registered could be a problem. Maybe HP is different.
    It looks like you've seriously raised the bar for that system.
    http://www.userbenchmark.com/System/HP-Z400-Workstation/67


    W3600 series supports up to 24GB (Just like the original i7)
    X5600 series supports up to 288GB

    You are correct, it has nothing to do with the motherboard. Max RAM supported is determined by the CPU.
  15. I've heard reports at Overclock.net in the X58 forum that 48GB is supported. Sometimes larger modules aren't available when a CPU is released so the higher capcity isn't listed.
    Since each increase in module size is 2X this is not uncommon. The original spec. on the E520 in my sig. was 4GB back when it supported Pentium4 CPUs, later BIOS for Core 2 CPUs brought 8GB support. The actual usefulness of 48GB is debateable unless your using Virtualization which would certainly be an option with 12 threads available. Another example is the X38 chipset having 400fsb hidden support. The CPUs that needed it didn't exist so it wasn't listed. But when Intel released 400fsb LGA775 CPUs the X48 wasn't available yet so they revealed to testers that X38 supported it already.
  16. william p said:
    I've heard reports at Overclock.net in the X58 forum that 48GB is supported. Sometimes larger modules aren't available when a CPU is released so the higher capcity isn't listed.
    Since each increase in module size is 2X this is not uncommon. The original spec. on the E520 in my sig. was 4GB back when it supported Pentium4 CPUs, later BIOS for Core 2 CPUs brought 8GB support. The actual usefulness of 48GB is debateable unless your using Virtualization which would certainly be an option with 12 threads available. Another example is the X38 chipset having 400fsb hidden support. The CPUs that needed it didn't exist so it wasn't listed. But when Intel released 400fsb LGA775 CPUs the X48 wasn't available yet so they revealed to testers that X38 supported it already.


    You could be right. I don't think 8GB DIMMs were available when the spec was released. I know that 8GB DIMMs work on X58 boards as I have done it myself, but not with 6x 8GB.
  17. There's been a lot of work done on The X58 workstations since this thread. There are some starts and stops so read through that stuff. But I think you'll find it interesting.
    https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q7WcQ_S4yT4
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