Throttlestop 8.48 on HP Z400.

Hello Guys,

I have bought HP Z400 machine it sports an intel Xeon W3680 @ which i am pretty sure has an unlocked multiplier. Now when try to overclock it using throttlestop 8.48 the multiplier slider does not go above x26, why is this, am i doing something horribly wrong.

BTW i have also tried Intel Xtreme Tuning Utility and it does not even show anything on Advance Tuning at all. (where i believe lies the sliders to overclock a CPU)

But this guy has done it using Dell mobo and intel XTU(video :https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v2EKs02I3Oc )

Please help me to overclock this CPU.

Thanks
Reply to Ateeb_345
7 answers Last reply
More about throttlestop z400
  1. I have a Z400 that i haven't tried to overclock, but I wouldn't do so either... OEM tent to be very skimpy on PSUs and MoBos, the two most important components for overclocking a CPU.
    Reply to Ne0Wolf7
  2. A lot of this is uncharted territiory. I have put your question to the Developer of TS to see what he thinks. The Extreme series CPUs respond. The unlocked Xeons are an experiment at this time. Can you raise Voltage?
    Aftermarket PSUs fit. heatsinking the VRM MOSFETs can make abig difference also.
    Here's how my OEM MB runs.
    http://valid.x86.fr/top-cpu/496e74656c28522920436f726528544d29322045787472656d652043505520513638303020204020322e393347487a
    Reply to william p
  3. The default multiplier for a Xeon W3680 is 25. When using ThrottleStop on these CPUs, you need to adjust the Set Multiplier value to the default multiplier value + 1. That tells the CPU to deliver maximum turbo boost. 25 + 1 = 26 so that is why ThrottleStop Set Multiplier tops out at that value.

    If your CPU is unlocked, you should be able to open up the Turbo Power Limits (TPL) window in ThrottleStop and adjust your turbo limits higher. This is how you overclock the early Core i CPUs. I do not know if the W3680 is unlocked. Even if it is unlocked, it is still possible that an individual manufacturer has set a lock bit in the bios to prevent overclocking. If this is the case, you will not be able to overclock this CPU without using a modified bios which likely does not exist for your HP motherboard.

    Post some pics of the TPL window. Are the adjusters in that window locked? ThrottleStop checks for the lock bit so this should tell you if you are going to be able to overclock or not.
    Reply to unclewebb
  4. william p said:
    A lot of this is uncharted territiory. I have put your question to the Developer of TS to see what he thinks. The Extreme series CPUs respond. The unlocked Xeons are an experiment at this time. Can you raise Voltage?
    Aftermarket PSUs fit. heatsinking the VRM MOSFETs can make abig difference also.
    Here's how my OEM MB runs.
    http://valid.x86.fr/top-cpu/496e74656c28522920436f726528544d29322045787472656d652043505520513638303020204020322e393347487a

    Thanks man, i have learned alot about throttle stop from the link
    Reply to Ateeb_345
  5. unclewebb said:
    The default multiplier for a Xeon W3680 is 25. When using ThrottleStop on these CPUs, you need to adjust the Set Multiplier value to the default multiplier value + 1. That tells the CPU to deliver maximum turbo boost. 25 + 1 = 26 so that is why ThrottleStop Set Multiplier tops out at that value.

    If your CPU is unlocked, you should be able to open up the Turbo Power Limits (TPL) window in ThrottleStop and adjust your turbo limits higher. This is how you overclock the early Core i CPUs. I do not know if the W3680 is unlocked. Even if it is unlocked, it is still possible that an individual manufacturer has set a lock bit in the bios to prevent overclocking. If this is the case, you will not be able to overclock this CPU without using a modified bios which likely does not exist for your HP motherboard.

    Post some pics of the TPL window. Are the adjusters in that window locked? ThrottleStop checks for the lock bit so this should tell you if you are going to be able to overclock or not.


    Yes i can open TPL tab and adjust TDP and TDA but i havent tried doing it.. But what i did is just increased the multiplier in TRL (Turbo Ratio Limit) for every core individually (as can be seen in image1)..
    image1 = https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-CUhDX05IWnUXFkRUpTQnpIQzg

    Now when i set the multiplier using TRL to 32 on all individual core PC crashed, it is maybe due to low voltage as i can not increase voltage refer to image1, why is that..

    BTW can i increase TDP in TPL so as to compensate for low voltage..
    And what is TDC is it current?

    PS here is the image of TPL window (https://drive.google.com/open?id=0B-CUhDX05IWncUtXSmNiUHRGZzg)
    Reply to Ateeb_345
  6. The first gen Core i CPUs do not have access to software voltage control. If there is not a voltage option in the bios then you are out of luck. Overclocking the multiplier will allow the voltage to increase automatically but this is not an ideal solution. At some point you are either going to end up with too much voltage and too much heat or not enough voltage and your CPU will crash.

    Can you post a screenshot of ThrottleStop while using a 30 or 31 multiplier? Put a load on the CPU like a few threads of the built in TS Bench test. Maybe include CPU-Z in your screenshot just to confirm.

    You only need to raise the power limits if your CPU is throttling while fully loaded. If your CPU is trying to go beyond 130 Watts or 110 Amps while running a stress test like Prime95, it will automatically reduce the CPU multiplier just enough to maintain power consumption just a hair under these limits. If you run into this problem, raising either or both of these power limits should allow your CPU to run at full speed. The only limitation is more MHz = more voltage = more heat.
    Reply to unclewebb
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