CPU over voltage error on replaced Asus H81M-CS motherboard

This is a follow-up question to this question.

I initially thought of updating that question, but it started to get too ugly so starting a new independent thread.

First some context

My Current Rig

  • Motherboard: Asus H81M-CS
  • Processor: i5-4440 3.1Ghz
  • Ram: Kingston hyperx fb-dimm
  • SSD: Kingston SSDNow 300 (128GB)
  • HDD: WD 1TB
  • Graphics Card: GTX 750Ti
  • PSU: iBall zps290


I also had a Netgear router that connected to the desktop. There was one main LAN cable that came from the ISP to the router and another that connected the desktop to the router. Recently some high voltage power lines outside came in contact with the ISP Lan cable, making it a live wire that destroyed everything in its way. The ISP bus mounted nearby exploded and so did my router. Before dying, my router passed on some of the surge to the motherboard which damaged it along with the keyboard and mouse as the USB ports were just near the LAN port.

The router itself along with my UPS were both connected to the same spike guard. The router I think shorted the spike guard too along with a tripper (something like a fuse) in my apartment. So to summarize, the ISP Lan became a high voltage wire, destroyed my router, but a few moments after the router had passed on the surge to my motherboard via LAN and also the spike guard it was connected to. This went on to the mains of my house.

I wasn't very sure as to how much damage the desktop had taken, I was only sure that the MoBo is gone and so has my keyboard and mouse. As my motherboard is under warranty I took it to the service center. The service center asked me to retain the CPU and 1 RAM stick when handing it over to them so they could validate if the CPU or RAM were causing any problems as well.

I just got it back today, at the center they connected it to a monitor and showed the BIOS load confirming the new mobo was fine. I also asked them to reconnect it to my cabinet and other components as I did not want to void the warranty. After this, the guy also removed the heatsink to show me that my original CPU was intact. While doing this, he also wiped off some thermal grease from the CPU chip to show me the details, however, there seemed to be some on the heat sink, so I didn't take it that seriously.

Satisfied I headed home and connected it. It said "new CPU detected" I got into setup, loaded the default settings and continued to boot. It proceeded to boot, started to load windows and then just as the loading screen appeared went off. On starting it again, it showed the start screen (the one with "press F2 or Del to enter BIOS") and restarted again. It did this by itself a couple of times and then displayed a "CPU over voltage error" along with a "Press F1 for setup" and restarted again.

As of now

At the first time, I try to start it, it lets me get into BIOS, check settings, etc and after a few seconds or a min of which it turns off and repeatedly restarts. After a few automatic restarts, it shows the "CPU over voltage error".

If I don't get into BIOS at the first start, it goes to the windows loading logo and then restarts.

Things I have tried so far

  • I noticed the service center guys had mixed by the cabinet's power indicator LED (-) and(+) connectors on the motherboard. Basically connected (+) to the (-) pin and vice versa. I fixed this.
  • Resetting BIOS (Both using a jumper and also by removing the CMOS battery and draining the system of power)
  • Connect the system to a different PSU (Intex Techno 450)
  • Booting into a Linux Live disk via a USB CD Drive


Resetting the BIOS did not help, it continued to behave in the same manner as before

When I connected to a different PSU, it seemed to last much longer than before. So much that I started to believe it was the previous PSU that was causing all the trouble. I went into BIOS, checked every setting I could. Searched if there was something I need to change and also kept a watch on the CPU temp. It started at around 40c or 41c and went up to roughly 46c.

I then turned off the machine, connected the USB CD Drive and attempted to boot into Linux, it started to load, went on for a while but at the Linux loading screen again began to restart. It restarted and showed me the CPU over voltage error again.

I then reconnected my old PSU, booted into BIOS and checked the CPU temp, it started at 37c and went on to about 43c and restarted as before.

I'm now exhausted of what more can be done.

Questions

Reply to TDsouza007
7 answers Last reply
More about cpu voltage error replaced asus h81m motherboard
  1. I've never heard of thermal grease but if you are talking about the thermal paste the guy should've replaced what he wiped off. I don't think it's a thermal issue though. If you're getting this voltage error you need to do a couple of things to troubleshoot. First is to make sure it's not your UPS. Connect the PC power cable directly into a wall outlet not the UPS and see if you still get the error. Don't assume the UPS is not causing the issue just because it's powering other things. If it's forcefully pushing too much power and the PSU isn't regulating it like it should then that would cause over voltage. If it turns out to not be the UPS then you need to make sure that the CPU is properly seated in the socket. To do this you are going to need to remove the heatsink and pull it out and put it back in the socket making sure that it doesn't slide around when you give it a little jiggle test. Before doing this though you should buy some thermal paste (the good kind like Arctic silver or similar. Never and I repeat NEVER cheap out on thermal paste) and get some cotton balls with 100% pure rubbing alcohol and clean the paste from the CPU and heatsink and then apply the new paste to the CPU and properly seat the heatsink on top of it.
    Reply to xSimply1337x
  2. Hi

    was this high voltage surge on your property or outside?
    do you have any contents insurance or is there some one you can sue for the cost of the repairs?

    I think you would be better off with a completely new PC as it is difficult to know whether the problem is the new motherboard, old CPU, old PSU etc

    If you have no insurance or anyone to sue then go back to the computer repair centre with the parts so they can test them and get the system working.

    if the power or hdd led is connected the wrong way they do no light up but no damage will be done.
    It is unlikely a bios message about over voltage is connected to cpu temperature which is not excessive, and relative to room temperature.

    You could check the voltage provided by the PSU, find a molex (auxillary) plug which has red, black, black & yellow wires
    yellow to black 12 Volts red to black 5 Volts with 5% tolerance

    regards
    Mike Barnes
    Reply to mbarnes86
  3. xSimply1337x said:
    I've never heard of thermal grease but if you are talking about the thermal paste the guy should've replaced what he wiped off. I don't think it's a thermal issue though. If you're getting this voltage error you need to do a couple of things to troubleshoot. First is to make sure it's not your UPS. Connect the PC power cable directly into a wall outlet not the UPS and see if you still get the error. Don't assume the UPS is not causing the issue just because it's powering other things. If it's forcefully pushing too much power and the PSU isn't regulating it like it should then that would cause over voltage. If it turns out to not be the UPS then you need to make sure that the CPU is properly seated in the socket. To do this you are going to need to remove the heatsink and pull it out and put it back in the socket making sure that it doesn't slide around when you give it a little jiggle test. Before doing this though you should buy some thermal paste (the good kind like Arctic silver or similar. Never and I repeat NEVER cheap out on thermal paste) and get some cotton balls with 100% pure rubbing alcohol and clean the paste from the CPU and heatsink and then apply the new paste to the CPU and properly seat the heatsink on top of it.


    I'm very confused now, I tried plugging directly to the wall outlet to check it the UPS was a problem as suggested. It seemed like it was. The system booted with no error, even logged into windows. I then restarted and went into BIOS. Kept an eye on the CPU voltage as well as temperature for almost 30 mins. The entire time, things we as stable as can be. The voltage did not jump at all. the core moved between 0.975 and 0.980 as far as I remember. Apart from this every thing even the temperature was at a max of 47c but not more than that. I had to step out of home for some time, so packed it all up and on returning thought of posting it here as solved.

    However, I thought of confirming this first, so plugged into the UPS again (What was I thinking). This time the CPU and cabinet fans just spun for a second o so and then went off. Convinced, I decided enough with the UPS and went back to the wall outlet. This time the same issue occurred there as well. The fans just turn for a brief moment and then it all turns off. Now, this is what I'm stuck with, I tried a different PSU, different wall outlets even different power cables between the PSU and outlet.

    I'm exhausted of ideas again, did I kill it with that one last silly attempt with the UPS?
    Reply to TDsouza007
  4. mbarnes86 said:
    Hi

    was this high voltage surge on your property or outside?
    do you have any contents insurance or is there some one you can sue for the cost of the repairs?

    I think you would be better off with a completely new PC as it is difficult to know whether the problem is the new motherboard, old CPU, old PSU etc

    If you have no insurance or anyone to sue then go back to the computer repair centre with the parts so they can test them and get the system working.

    if the power or hdd led is connected the wrong way they do no light up but no damage will be done.
    It is unlikely a bios message about over voltage is connected to cpu temperature which is not excessive, and relative to room temperature.

    You could check the voltage provided by the PSU, find a molex (auxillary) plug which has red, black, black & yellow wires
    yellow to black 12 Volts red to black 5 Volts with 5% tolerance

    regards
    Mike Barnes


    Thanks for the advice, it happened outside my property. In fact, it wasn't a surge it was more of the two wires (LAN and high voltage live wire) coming in contact with each other thus making the LAN wire charged with high voltage. Currently, the power utility guys and ISP guys are just blaming each other over who's wire wasn't connected properly.

    The ISP guys, however, were kind enough to replace my router for free no questions asked. Power Utility guys are assholes.

    So there is no insurance or guys to sue, if anything I have manufacturer's warranty for each component but that means I'd have to first figure out what's wrong and then chase the respective manufacturer.

    If it does not void the warranty, I guess I'll take it to a generic service center to figure out what actually went wrong and then try claiming warranty.

    I'm not very familiar with electricity so didn't understand your suggestion about checking the voltage using a Molex. Did you mean I use a multimeter and plug the nodes into one of the HDD power points (Molex) of the PSU.
    Reply to TDsouza007
  5. So when you plugged it back into the UPS and nothing happened now nothing happens at all?

    Unplug the PC completely and hold down the power button for 30sec. Use the rest jumper on the motherboard if you have one to reset the BIOS at boot. If you get it to post don't let it go past bios. Just go into the BIOS and then from there hold down power button on PC too hard shut down. Then put the jumper back to where it was and boot up.
    Reply to xSimply1337x
  6. xSimply1337x said:
    So when you plugged it back into the UPS and nothing happened now nothing happens at all?

    Unplug the PC completely and hold down the power button for 30sec. Use the rest jumper on the motherboard if you have one to reset the BIOS at boot. If you get it to post don't let it go past bios. Just go into the BIOS and then from there hold down the power button on PC too hard shut down. Then put the jumper back to where it was and boot up.


    Yes, basically now, the fans just turn for a very brief moment and then it's all off.

    I tried the power drain as well as the jumper reset but still the same issue. BTW, my board has two pins that I need to short using a jumper/screwdriver to reset the BIOS, not sure what you meant when you said "put the jumper back to where it was". Is there another process I'm missing.

    As of now, I don't even get any POST error messages.
    Reply to TDsouza007
  7. Just an update, I took it to the service center, they checked it, re soldered a few things, updated the BIOS and said the BIOS was an issue. I left it running at the service center for a good 20-30 mins and the voltage readings were all ok. I got it home, connected it (Via UPS) and it worked all fine. Again, I kept it running for a good 30 mins and there were no issues (readings were all normal). But, the next day it showed the same issues again. All the fans start spinning for a brief moment (<2 seconds) and then shuts off.

    I have finally got this replaced refurbished motherboard replaced, but now, I'm scared to connect it to my old system as I feel it's something (SMPS/UPS) that's causing the issue. The service center guys told me that if I still face the issue, it's probably my processor or something else in my cabinet. This made me skeptical regarding the warranty coverage at this point.

    I'm considering buying a new proper SMPS, mostly one of the following

    1. http://www.amazon.in/Circle-400-Watt-CPH698-SMPS/dp/B01N2NRQWL/ref=sr_1_6?ie=UTF8&qid=1503174081&sr=8-6&keywords=smps

    2. http://www.amazon.in/Corsair-VS450-450-Watt-Power-Supply/dp/B00X8QBT6M/ref=sr_1_4?ie=UTF8&qid=1503174081&sr=8-4&keywords=smps

    3. http://www.amazon.in/Frontech-JIL-2423-600W-PSU-Connector/dp/B01AD2TBBI/ref=sr_1_15?s=computers&ie=UTF8&qid=1503174453&sr=1-15&keywords=smps

    None of these would fit in my cabinet, but I can make arrangements, to hold them properly. I'm kinda low on budget, but really don't wanna risk blowing up this motherboard as well. I'm not sure if the current PSU is fine or no.

    Now the question is
    1. Should I still take a chance with my existing PSU in the interest of unnecessary expense
    2. If yes, how do I ensure the least damage to the new motherboard
    3. If no, then which of the above would you recommend as a great deal
    Reply to TDsouza007
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