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B250 Chipset Quick Question

So im planning to get the B250M Pro-VD mobo from MSI paired with an i3-6100 CPU. This might be a stupid question but, will the board support an older gen processor straight out of the box? I know it supports kaby lake but i dont know if itll work with older gens without needing a bios update. ty in advance
Reply to Rhescape
7 answers Last reply Best Answer
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  1. Best answer
    Normally you only need to perform a BIOS update to get support for newer CPUs. Not the other way around.

    So you most likely won't need to do a BIOS update. However, its not a bad idea to do it anyways. BIOS updates also include fixes and optimization changes.
    Reply to androbourne
  2. Don't update the bios unless there is an issue. Flashing the bios has risk and can damage your board. If you do it, don't do it through windows, do it through a usb in the bios.
    Reply to feelinfroggy777
  3. Updating BIOS is a very common practice. To advise against it, is not a smart idea.

    It fixes issues, add more compatibility for newer devices and can resolve optimization issues, just like drivers would for anything else. The "dont change it if it isn't broken" tactics is what ill informed techs use to get out of doing something properly.

    Nowadays it is hard to brick your BIOS doing an update. As long as you follow the manufactures recommendations and download the exact BIOS version for your board. You shouldn't run into any issues.

    And in the case you do, you always have hard BIOS reset (removal of CMOS battery) as a last resort if that was to ever happen. Which is very unlikely if you followed the proper manufacture instructions.
    Reply to androbourne
  4. androbourne said:
    Nowadays it is hard to brick your BIOS doing an update. As long as you follow the manufactures recommendations and download the exact BIOS version for your board. You shouldn't run into any issues.

    And in the case you do, you always have hard BIOS reset (removal of CMOS battery) as a lost resort if that was to ever happen.

    Clearing CMOS won't recover from a botched BIOS upgrade, not unless your motherboard has a dual BIOS feature anyway.
    Reply to TJ Hooker
  5. Depends on the corruption. Most manufactures recommend resetting your BIOS to factory defaults before performing the flash. If for some reason that wasn't done or saved properly. Resetting the CMOS can force it back to factory settings and resolve a soft brick.

    Also nowadays the firmware is encoded with version and board compatibility checks to ensure you are applying the correct firmware. It will fail and not even allow you to flash the BIOS if you attempt to use the wrong version on most modern systems.

    Not saying it isn't possible. Just saying it is no excuse to avoid doing an update on something.

    I have to perform quarterly firmware\BIOS updates on enterprise grade servers and workstations. This has never been an issue, especially if you follow manufactures suggestions.
    Reply to androbourne
  6. androbourne said:
    Depends on the corruption. Most manufactures recommend resetting your BIOS to factory defaults before performing the flash. If for some reason that wasn't done or saved properly. Resetting the CMOS can force it back to factory settings and resolve a soft brick.

    Also nowadays the firmware is encoded with version and board compatibility checks to ensure you are applying the correct firmware. It will fail and not even allow you to flash the BIOS if you attempt to use the wrong version on most modern systems.

    Not saying it isn't possible. Just saying it is no excuse to avoid doing an update on something.

    I have to perform quarterly firmware\BIOS updates on enterprise grade servers and workstations. This has never been an issue, especially if you follow manufactures suggestions.


    Ok, you can ignore all of the warnings manufactures provide about flashing a bios. I only speak for myself, I don't flash a bios unless there is a specific need or issue.

    Additionally, if my consumer grade, gigabyte z170 board has dual bios, I would expect enterprise systems to have it as well as data or production loss can be catastrophic.
    Reply to feelinfroggy777
  7. I think the biggest risk most people face when flashing BIOS is your power going out. If your PC turns off in the middle of a BIOS update it'll almost certainly be bricked (except if you have a dual BIOS, which I think should save you in that situation). So don't update it during a thunderstorm, and if you live somewhere with frequent black/brown outs you may want a UPS to be on the safe side.
    Reply to TJ Hooker
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