Every Overclock I try Blue Screens and I do not understand why.

Hello all,
I recently purchased a i7 6700k and just began to start to try overclocking. I am very new to it though and I have not had the best experience with it so far. I am running a Hyper 212 Evo so obviously I'm not trying very big overclocks but none are working. For example, I was trying to just do a 4.4 GHz OC at 1.24v and after 20-30 minutes of gaming I get a BSOD but when I revert back to stock it never BSOD's or crashes at all. I have also tried many different OCs. 4.6 at 1.33v, 4.5 at 1.3 4.3 at 1.22 4.7 at 1.4. All of them crash.
Reply to Werepig
7 answers Last reply
More about overclock blue screens understand
  1. That could be a power supply issue (not necessarily PSU tho, could be VRM too). Have you tried fiddling with loadline for example (because maybe the voltage drops too much under load)? I don't see what could cause BSODs after a certain *time*. Try stress testing, it's easier to debug max load failures than game loads. I used to have random crashes until I raised the voltages enough and adjusted loadline calibration, now *nothing* causes a BSOD.
    Reply to nyannyan
  2. What is your tempratures on the cpu while gaming?
    Reply to lumineZ
  3. How well you can do will be determined by your luck in getting a good chip.
    As of 12/04/2016
    What percent can get an overclock at a somewhat sane 1.4v Vcore.

    I7-6700K
    4.9 5%
    4.8 21%
    4.7 64%
    4.6 96%

    My suggestion is to set all voltages to auto and gradually raise the all cores multiplier.
    Stress test keeping the temperatures <85c. and vcore no more than 1.4.
    Monitor your test with cpu-z.

    AVX instructions are not that common in normal usage, but when they are used, it can cost you a couple of multipliers. Prime95 is one stresser that will use AVX.
    If your motherboard bios supports AVX offset, use that to lower the max multiplier when it encounters AVX instructions.
    Reply to geofelt
  4. nyannyan said:
    That could be a power supply issue (not necessarily PSU tho, could be VRM too). Have you tried fiddling with loadline for example (because maybe the voltage drops too much under load)? I don't see what could cause BSODs after a certain *time*. Try stress testing, it's easier to debug max load failures than game loads. I used to have random crashes until I raised the voltages enough and adjusted loadline calibration, now *nothing* causes a BSOD.


    Thank you for your response but I was wondering about 2 things, how does one calibrate the loadline and what is the VRM, do you mean VRAM? Sorry I am somewhat new to the very technical parts of OC and computer components.
    Reply to Werepig
  5. VRM is Voltage Regulation Module. If it's not designed for overclcocking it can limit your results. Putting heatsinks on the transistors there can help.
    Reply to william p
  6. william p said:
    VRM is Voltage Regulation Module. If it's not designed for overclcocking it can limit your results. Putting heatsinks on the transistors there can help.

    How much do these heat sinks cost? Also, if I have an overclocking motherboard, shouldnt the VRM's be designed for overclocking?
    Reply to Werepig
  7. Just because a MB can overclock doesn't mean it's designed for it. But yes if you have a high end board it should be ready.
    VRM is located next to the CPU socket. There are small cubes, or on older boards ceramic beads wound with wire. each of them will have 2 or 3 transistors next to it. They will look like small black chips about 1/4" square. If you see finned heatsinks next to the chokes you already have them. Enzotech MOS-C1 forged copper would be the expensive option. The cheap option would be to cut up and old GPU heatsink form a 12 year old video card. Aluminum ones form China would be the other way to go. The indication for this would be that you can't make enough Voltage to support your overclock. I've seen cheap "overclocking" MB where the chipset only supports 95W CPUs.
    Reply to william p
Ask a new question Answer

Read More

Overclocking Blue Screen Intel i7