Is the Ryzen 7 1700 really THAT good?

So for the past four months now I've been trying to get down on paper the components I need for what I wanted to be doing. I started looking at Broadwell, but I want to build a music production station (+gaming) and from what I learned a lot of music production software actually benefited more from Skylake, it supported the extra cores of Broadwell but didn't necessarily perform better with the slower clock speeds.

So I decided to settle on a Z170 because it seemed to suit my needs and was a lot cheaper, meaning I could buy better audio equipment and maybe a better video card. But now the boat has been rocked again, with the introduction of the Z270 and Kabylake naturally I decided to upgrade to the Z270 platform and the Kabylake CPU. But ever since then as I've been Adkin advice, is ask for help with a Z270 build and almost everyone would come back with an AMD Ryzen 7 build which is not what I asked with help for.

So is the Ryzen 7 1700 really that good? It has 8/16 cores/threads but is only 3.2Ghz compared to 4.2Ghz with the i7 7700K (I won't be overclocking until I well surpass noob status).

I find it very hard to get answers, I'm building a very specific machine and I need to know I'm going to get the best performance for its intended purpose. I won't be doing CPU rendering at all, all rendering I'd be doing would be with the CUDA Cores of my video card. I've seen people arguing comparing the Ryzen to this or that, after spending months researching intel based CPUs the last thing I need now is to have to start researching AMD CPUs as well.

Any input is appreciated, thanks.
Reply to esprade
24 answers Last reply
More about ryzen 1700 good
  1. The 7700k is the quintessential gaming chip on the market today, but if you want to do video editing or content creation, then you will see more benefit form a 1700 than you will a 7700k. The Ryzen lineup are great processors and will see benefit to any software that scales with more cores. But most software does not scale well with more cores.

    If your primary focus is gaming, go with the 7700k. If you want to do more than game, go with Ryzen 7. Both of the chips are great chips.

    Also, there are rumors that intel will be releasing coffee lake soon, which will essentially be a 6 core 12 thread version of the 7700k, this could be a very good chip for both gaming and content creation.
    Reply to feelinfroggy777
  2. Ryzen 7 1700 is good, and is definitely more of an all-rounder than a 7700k. I would say make the bump-up to a 1700X but both are very good for nearly all purposes.

    Overclocking on most Ryzen motherboards is also incredibly easy, and with a couple google searches and an aftermarket cooler and you'll be A-OK to overclock, putting it above the 7700k's performance.

    Don't get me wrong, if you pick the 7700k it's also an amazing CPU, especially for gaming, but it seems that the Ryzen 7 1700(X) is better for your purposes.
    Reply to JalYt_Justin
  3. The 1700 is good if you are going to overclock it otherwise it is a bit slow on single threaded tasks. The Ryzen 1600x is a better fit for an all around CPU if you are not overlooking to be honest. Its only 6 cores / 12 threads but it has a higher stock frequency / boost.

    So you are doing music production, some type of rendering and gaming? Music production software from what I have been exposed to inst to heavy on CPU so I don't think that really matters on the CPU chose(1700 vs 7700k). More so want to make sure you have a good SSD drive and 16-32 GB of memory.

    For rendering would have to know the software but the 1700 would shine if its one of the packages that are multi-threaded.

    For current games the 7700k is better vs the stock 1700 (not OC'ed).

    Decide what is most important games(7700k) or rendering(1600x or 1700). Its a trade off of better single threaded performance(7700k) or double the cores / threads(1700) with slightly worse single threaded performance. The 1600x straddles that a bit which depending on your priorities may be a good fit too.
    Reply to JamesSneed
  4. esprade said:
    I want to build a music production station (+gaming) and from what I learned a lot of music production software actually benefited more from Skylake, it supported the extra cores of Broadwell but didn't necessarily perform better with the slower clock speeds.

    I won't be doing CPU rendering at all, all rendering I'd be doing would be with the CUDA Cores of my video card.



    It sounds like Kaby Lake would be your best choice; or Coffee Lake if you wait another month and see if/when it launches.
    Reply to MrN1ce9uy
  5. You should wait for Coffee Lake, it will be released soon.. Coffee Lake comes strong with a core i5 8600K with 6 cores @4.3GHz and a new i7 8700K with 6 cores @4.7GHz


    Reply to YoAndy
  6. I think Coffeelake is the solution, thank you to everyone who chimed in. I'm not in a hurry to get the machine built, what's more important is that I spend the time making sure that the machine gets its maximum potential out of its components for the software I'll be using, mostly FL Studio, Ableton, Blender and Unreal Engine 4. Since I'd be getting an nvidia GPU I don't need to rely on the CPU for rendering unless I'm playing a CPU intensive game, which I probably won't be. When I say gaming I'll probably buy rise of the tomb raider or something, the primary focus for the GPU is to get the most out of UE4 for video game and VR experimentation. But music is the primary focus, it has to handle the software and all the hardware, such as a MIDI keyboard with no latency, that's the absolute number one priority.
    Reply to esprade
  7. Saying that there's no knowing how long it will be until intels 8th gen will be released. Ughh I wish I knew more about this stuff, this is how I know I'm getting old lol.
    Reply to esprade
  8. I personally just upgraded to a Ryzen 1600 series (heard it was better for gaming than the 1700 series) and it works really freakishly well. On pubg if I punch everything to ultra it just sits on 8 fps for 2 seconds then clocks back up to 80+ FPS with a 1060 Nvidia card. I get better performance than my friends with a 7700k and there's several bugs with the 7700k (hardware related) that I found out which is why my ryzen kept out performing my friend's 7700K computers who had better cards than I did. It really allocates power really efficiently. I'm super happy with my Ryzen and how it performs especially after having to help several people trouble shoot their 7700K intel CPU's due to weird issues like having a lower FPS than they should have due to hardware bugs and what not.
    Reply to Faike
  9. esprade said:
    So I decided to settle on a Z170 because it seemed to suit my needs and was a lot cheaper, meaning I could buy better audio equipment and maybe a better video card. But now the boat has been rocked again, with the introduction of the Z270 and Kabylake naturally I decided to upgrade to the Z270 platform and the Kabylake CPU. But ever since then as I've been Adkin advice, is ask for help with a Z270 build and almost everyone would come back with an AMD Ryzen 7 build which is not what I asked with help for.

    Do you already have a Z170/skylake build, and you're now talking about moving to a Z270/kaby lake build (or maybe Ryzen)?
    Reply to TJ Hooker
  10. I think the Z170/Skylake was just his [on]-paper build. But let's let him say for sure.
    Reply to MrN1ce9uy
  11. Faike said:
    I personally just upgraded to a Ryzen 1600 series (heard it was better for gaming than the 1700 series) and it works really freakishly well. On pubg if I punch everything to ultra it just sits on 8 fps for 2 seconds then clocks back up to 80+ FPS with a 1060 Nvidia card. I get better performance than my friends with a 7700k and there's several bugs with the 7700k (hardware related) that I found out which is why my ryzen kept out performing my friend's 7700K computers who had better cards than I did. It really allocates power really efficiently. I'm super happy with my Ryzen and how it performs especially after having to help several people trouble shoot their 7700K intel CPU's due to weird issues like having a lower FPS than they should have due to hardware bugs and what not.


    Hmm not sure if trolling.. The i7 7700K is the king of Gaming CPU's and the Intel platform is the more stable and bug free platform of the two. Intel has better IPC than any Ryzen CPU out there.
    Reply to YoAndy
  12. This is an entirely fresh build, no upgrading from anything, first it was between X99 (Broadwell) vs Z170 (Skylake), once I chose Z170 it's now it's Z270 Kabylake vs Ryzen 7. Lol, once I made a decision something new came along. I don't get why people compare multi thread processing to single thread processing when at least, imo, the X99 platform has more in common with the Ryzen 7.

    Coffee Lake sounds awesome, but I don't want to wait forever, I guess what I need to know is what CPU will be best for music production and VR as those will be my two productivities, music being the primary one, VR being a longer term project as I'm spending the cash on the sound equipment and not the VR equipment.
    Reply to esprade
  13. Actually the 7700k seems to have better average and max fps but worse dips. I'd personally take 4-5 less fps on average to stay 8-9 fps higher on the low end
    Reply to Supahos
  14. <<Extraneous content removed by moderator>>

    Ryzen. The 1700 is going to do all you need and more. For far less. One socket for the next several years. Not a new socket every six months for .01 ghz performance and other Intel nonsense. Delusions abound, facts, not so much.

    Set out your budget. Read legit reviews from multiple sources including motherboards and other components. In the end it is your money. Get the most out of it. The 'manhood' choice is Intel if you're secretly deficient in that manner. The economical and logic performance choice is Ryzen.
    Reply to Ditt44
  15. He said the audio software benefits from higher clock speeds more than it does core/thread count. That's why I say Intel sounds like the best choice for him. His priority is audio creation and second comes gaming. It will probably be another 3-5 years before AMD has a processor that comes close to the single-core speed of the 7700K/8700K.

    *Ryzen 7 1700's single core speed is on par with Intel's (6 year old) Sandy Bridge i7-2600K.
    Reply to MrN1ce9uy
  16. esprade said:
    This is an entirely fresh build, no upgrading from anything, first it was between X99 (Broadwell) vs Z170 (Skylake), once I chose Z170 it's now it's Z270 Kabylake vs Ryzen 7. Lol, once I made a decision something new came along. I don't get why people compare multi thread processing to single thread processing when at least, imo, the X99 platform has more in common with the Ryzen 7.

    Coffee Lake sounds awesome, but I don't want to wait forever, I guess what I need to know is what CPU will be best for music production and VR as those will be my two productivities, music being the primary one, VR being a longer term project as I'm spending the cash on the sound equipment and not the VR equipment.


    I try to avoid telling people to wait on the next technology about to be released because technology is so fast that as soon as coffee lake comes out, zen 2 will be on the horizon. Intel has said that coffee lake will come out in Q4. However rumors say that it will be released this August. So it may be worth waiting a few weeks.

    As for X99 vs Ryzen, there is only one reason to choose X99 over Ryzen at this point is for the additional PCIe lanes and quad channel memory. If the 8 core Threadripper chip, that will be released in 10 days, performs in line with the Ryzen chips, it will make the X99 platform obsolete on a price vs performance comparison.

    The fact is, if a workstation is your primary focus, go with Ryzen or Threadripper (which I think is overkill in your situation). If gaming performance is your primary buying decision, then go with the 7700k. If your not in a big hurry and want the new chip that should do both, wait for coffee lake.

    It sounds like you are wanting a workstation computer that can game, if that is the case, then the Ryzen 7 chips were made for you.
    Reply to feelinfroggy777
  17. The big question is, will Z270 motherboards have the bios updates necessary to support Coffee Lake? To my knowledge half of them don't even support Kaby Lake and already require a CPU in order to update the bios.
    Reply to esprade
  18. I suggest looking for benchmarks with the particular software you will be using and tasks you will be doing. Audio creation can be different than other media creation.
    Reply to MrN1ce9uy
  19. Good suggestion thanks!
    Reply to esprade
  20. esprade said:
    The big question is, will Z270 motherboards have the bios updates necessary to support Coffee Lake? To my knowledge half of them don't even support Kaby Lake and already require a CPU in order to update the bios.


    The Z270 motherboards support Kaby Lake, they Z270 chipset was developed for Kaby Lake. Now the Z170 chipset does require a bios update to run Kaby Lake, but there are motherboard models that you can flash the bios without a CPU.

    The rumors are that Coffee Lake will be 1151 socket and will have the Z370 chipset. Meaning the Coffee Lake chips should have compatibility with the 170 and 270 chipsets (with a bios flash). I would still take this with a grain of salt until Intel confirms the information. But if Coffee Lake is compatible with Z170 and Z270, the i7 8700k will be a very popular chip.

    None of this should matter to you because you have not gotten a motherboard. If you choose coffee lake, you would get a Z370 motherboard to pair with your Coffee Lake chip and it will be plug and play right out of the box.
    Reply to feelinfroggy777
  21. Supahos said:
    Actually the 7700k seems to have better average and max fps but worse dips. I'd personally take 4-5 less fps on average to stay 8-9 fps higher on the low end


    I've seen i5's with noticeable dips in minimum gaming framerates, but, in what games was the 7700k's minimum framerate also less than that of a Ryzen?
    Reply to mdd1963
  22. There are actually several. Look at the more recent reviews (heck there are a few games where ryzen wins outright) but pubg was what I meant since it was specifically mentioned
    Reply to Supahos
  23. Supahos said:
    Actually the 7700k seems to have better average and max fps but worse dips. I'd personally take 4-5 less fps on average to stay 8-9 fps higher on the low end


    I can remember seeing this and would have to agree with you. A smooth gaming experience is all about the minimum fps.
    Reply to MrN1ce9uy
  24. esprade said:
    So for the past four months now I've been trying to get down on paper the components I need for what I wanted to be doing. I started looking at Broadwell...So is the Ryzen 7 1700 really that good? ... Any input is appreciated, thanks.


    It really is that good.

    I've been through the same process as you, having to replace my aging Asus P5 Q9650 8GB GTX 1050 system (it was a life extension experiment). After much research I was about to go i7 7700K or Skylake-X, then decided to look at AMD.

    All those chips (Coffeelake, Skylake-X, Threadripper etc etc) look great but they are expensive, large, and power hungry.

    After much research I settled on the Ryzen 1700 as best bang for buck for a multipurpose workstation build that will have some longevity and upgrade capability.

    I built a Ryzen 1700 + Asus Prime B350 plus workstation last week for Development, media, music, and gaming use.
    I went with 2666mhz 16gb Ram initially for stability reasons.

    I've been running it for a week using Asus EZ System Tuning performance profile at 3.65ghz (all 8 cores) and it's been rock solid.
    Been playing with it a little today using Ryzen Master and currently running at 3.75ghz @ 1.25v on Stock Wraith Cooler (crashing out on lower voltage, slowly been raising it till stable).
    Edit: I can get 3.8Ghz @ 1.3v stable, with temps ~mid 40's ambient room ~27 Degrees Centigrade (aircon, it's hot here in Tokyo atm)
    Cpuz benchmarking shows it's pretty impressive performance too.

    Was using Ableton Live x64 last night with 4gb+ ram from VSTi's and it's rock solid.
    Gaming is great (Nvidia 1060 6gb) - No Man's Sky V1.3 runs just fine (good test of a stable and non-bottlenecked system;-).

    For development (web, Unity3D, Visual Studio) it is very snappy.

    Much more bang for buck than I could have got going with Intel (much as I love them)


    My tweet with some build photos

    Build Components
    Ryzen 7 1700 + ASUS PRIME B350-PLUS
    Windows 10 Pro
    Ram Corsair CMK16GX4M2A2666C16
    GPU GTX 1060 6gb
    Samsung 960 EVO M.2 250gb
    Seagate Firecuda 2gb
    Cooler Master V750 Semi Modular PSU
    S340 Elite VR Case

    Extras:
    2 x Noctua NF-P14s redux-1200 PWM
    Logitech Wireless Mouse/Keyboard
    Reply to sonicviz
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