Can I make a Samsung 960 EVO 250gb my boot drive?

I am looking at purchasing a Samsung 960 evo 250gb ssd to serve as a boot drive in a current build. I have a 1tb Crucial SSD as the current (only hard drive) on an Asus Prime X370-Pro MOBO. With this in mind is it possible to just clone my existing drive onto the new one? I was told by someone that you cannot clone a larger drive onto a smaller one.
Reply to CStone2
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  1. It's not the disk-space capacity of the "source" drive, i.e., your 1 TB SSD, that's the controlling factor here - it's the TOTAL volume of data on that drive. The "destination" drive's disk-space capacity, i.e., your 250 GB SSD must be sufficient to contain that total amount of data. I presume that that will not be the case here in view of the size of the 1 TB HDD. But perhaps if the total data is in the neighborhood of not more than let's say - 200 GB or so - you could go ahead with a successful disk-cloning operation.

    Also, if your boot (C:) drive was located on a separate partition of the 1 TB HDD and that partition was say, 200 GB or so - that would be another way to effect the disk-cloning operation using a program that would have the capability of cloning partitions (not all d-c programs have that capability).

    Capiche?
    Reply to ArtPog
  2. ArtPog, thank you for the advice/answer to my question. Actually my C:/ Drive only has 156gb used so far so I am assuming based on your answer that I should have no problem cloning my drive and making that my boot/primary drive for applications/games I already have installed but for everything else I eventually download I will need to put it on my 1tb SSD. Thanks again for the answer.
    Reply to CStone2
  3. Imoven said:
    Good point, ArtPog.
    Hi, CStone2. If purchase Samsung SSD, you will get a snap-in Samsung Data Migration (SDM) software to help you migrate everything from old hard drive to the SSD. You can refer to following link for detailed steps of using SDM.
    If want to run SSD for OS and HDD for storage on your computer, SDM may not be the most help one since it will move all content to target SSD instead of OS drive only.
    http:/indows-10-3889.html


    1. First of all, we trust the OP, CStone was successful re the disk-cloning operation. The SDM program should be able to carry out that d-c operation successfully.

    2. The following is just to clarify the capability of the SDM program as it relates to the OP's situation in the event you're not familiar with these items.

    It's conceivable that in the OP's situation his 1 TB source (boot) drive might have had only a single partition that contained TOTAL data contents well exceeding the disk-space capacity of the intended recipient of the clone, i.e., the Samsung 250 GB SSD. In that event the d-c operation would not have been able to be carried out via the SDM program. However his source drive might have been multi-partitioned so that one of the partitions was, in effect, his boot partition (C:) which contained the 156 GB of data. He never really makes that clear so it's possible (perhaps even likely) that the 1 TB source drive had been single (C:\) partitioned and contained only a total of 156 GB of data. In any event there would be no problem in utilizing the SDM program to clone that total 156 GB of data containing the OS over to his new Samsung 250 GB SSD whether that 156 GB of data represented the TOTAL data contents of the 1 TB source drive or whether it represented the data in a SINGLE (C:) PARTITION of a multi-partitioned source drive. I trust you understand the concept.

    3. One other point of clarification in case you're not aware of it. Unlike most other disk-cloning programs the SDM program will NOT carry out a d-c operation if the source drive does not contain an OS. Many users have been disappointed in learning that they're unable to utilize the SDM program to clone the contents of a SECONDARY drive (one used for storage/backups, etc.) that does not contain an OS. There are a few other limitations of the program but by & large they're minor.
    Reply to ArtPog
  4. ArtPog said:
    Imoven said:
    Good point, ArtPog.
    Hi, CStone2. If purchase Samsung SSD, you will get a snap-in Samsung Data Migration (SDM) software to help you migrate everything from old hard drive to the SSD. You can refer to following link for detailed steps of using SDM.
    If want to run SSD for OS and HDD for storage on your computer, SDM may not be the most help one since it will move all content to target SSD instead of OS drive only.
    http://www.backup-utility.com/clone/samsung-data-migration-software-for-windows-10-3889.html


    1. First of all, we trust the OP, CStone was successful re the disk-cloning operation. The SDM program should be able to carry out that d-c operation successfully.

    2. The following is just to clarify the capability of the SDM program as it relates to the OP's situation in the event you're not familiar with these items.

    It's conceivable that in the OP's situation his 1 TB source (boot) drive might have had only a single partition that contained TOTAL data contents well exceeding the disk-space capacity of the intended recipient of the clone, i.e., the Samsung 250 GB SSD. In that event the d-c operation would not have been able to be carried out via the SDM program. However his source drive might have been multi-partitioned so that one of the partitions was, in effect, his boot partition (C:) which contained the 156 GB of data. He never really makes that clear so it's possible (perhaps even likely) that the 1 TB source drive had been single (C:\) partitioned and contained only a total of 156 GB of data. In any event there would be no problem in utilizing the SDM program to clone that total 156 GB of data containing the OS over to his new Samsung 250 GB SSD whether that 156 GB of data represented the TOTAL data contents of the 1 TB source drive or whether it represented the data in a SINGLE (C:) PARTITION of a multi-partitioned source drive. I trust you understand the concept.

    3. One other point of clarification in case you're not aware of it. Unlike most other disk-cloning programs the SDM program will NOT carry out a d-c operation if the source drive does not contain an OS. Many users have been disappointed in learning that they're unable to utilize the SDM program to clone the contents of a SECONDARY drive (one used for storage/backups, etc.) that does not contain an OS. There are a few other limitations of the program but by & large they're minor.


    Very glad to know. :wahoo:
    Reply to Imoven
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