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What is a good PSU to go along with a GTX 960 SSC

That's right, it's me again. I finally decided it'll actually be easier just to upgrade my power system..and safer.
I know *nothing* about what makes a power supply unit a good one; I know amperage/wattage are vital, but now how or why. Could anyone recommend me a PSU that has the qualities to power my GTX 960 SSC and MSI AM3 V X16 2D3 M16 GL R MATX motherboard please?
Reply to Mantha065
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More about good psu gtx 960 ssc
  1. Reply to Karadjgne
  2. Karadjgne said:


    This has only a 6+2 pin, and I've read that doing that with an 8-pin isn't a good thing to do for very long.
    Reply to Mantha065
  3. Most PSUs that offer 500 Watts or more will work in that config, just ensure the pin count is correct (24 or 20) and that if you have extra CPU plugs on the mother board the PSU comes with enough to cover them as well. Newegg has a PSU calculator that you can use and in my opinion make sure that you get about 100 extra watts above the recommendation. The other thing to consider is the rating. Bronze is the worst for power consumption, beyond that there is silver gold etc. Read up on that if you want to ensure that your PSU doesn't raise the power bill too much :)
    Reply to Daniel_424
  4. Daniel_424 said:
    Most PSUs that offer 500 Watts or more will work in that config, just ensure the pin count is correct (24 or 20) and that if you have extra CPU plugs on the mother board the PSU comes with enough to cover them as well. Newegg has a PSU calculator that you can use and in my opinion make sure that you get about 100 extra watts above the recommendation. The other thing to consider is the rating. Bronze is the worst for power consumption, beyond that there is silver gold etc. Read up on that if you want to ensure that your PSU doesn't raise the power bill too much :)


    I don't really have a lot of time during the day to read up on computer stuff lol...I don't know which of those two is the correct pin count for me, nor do I know how many CPU plugs are on the motherboard. Is there a way to find this out, without opening up my computer?
    Reply to Mantha065
  5. The Corsair CXM450w has a single pcie LEAD. But that lead terminates in 2x 6+2pin connectors. It'll power that gtx960 easily.
    Reply to Karadjgne
  6. Karadjgne said:
    The Corsair CXM450w has a single pcie LEAD. But that lead terminates in 2x 6+2pin connectors. It'll power that gtx960 easily.


    I thought it was a bad thing to not use the proper cable...okay. So how do I make a 6+2pin work? Is it just a matter of fitting them perpendicularly to the power plug?
    Reply to Mantha065
  7. The last 2 power pins are not physically connected to the 6, they are just connected by the wire bundle so you can safely attach the cable without issue. The 6 pin only fits 1 way into the GPU.
    Reply to Daniel_424
  8. Daniel_424 said:
    The last 2 power pins are not physically connected to the 6, they are just connected by the wire bundle so you can safely attach the cable without issue. The 6 pin only fits 1 way into the GPU.


    is there a video that could explain how to do this? Your instructions are detailed but I'm having trouble picturing all this in my head. I would open my computer and look at all of this but it would be much faster to just watch a video rather than puzzle it out on my own.
    Reply to Mantha065
  9. Imagine an 8pin plug. Now split the actual connector into a 6pin and a 2pin. Same wires, fits on the same place as an 8pin,is identical in every way except it's modular, it'll work for a 6pin or an 8pin connection. Has a small key on the connector, so you add the 2 sides together first, then plug into the 8pin slot. Almost every psu made in the 400-800w range uses 6+2pin because the gpus are ranged from 6pin to 8+8pin but will most likely have a 6 or combination of 6 or like my Asus, a single 8. It's just a way to make a universal fit, no matter what the gpu. Above @800w, there's many units that have dedicated 8pin pcie simply because those units are intended for sli/crossfire use of the most powerful gpus all of which will most likely be using at least 1 8pin and either an 8 or 6pin secondary.

    So you'll not find anything under @800w with dedicated 8pin, they'll all be 6+2pin pcie.
    https://s11.postimg.org/x0an2w4yr/2017-07-07-17-25-10-.jpg

    The 2 fit together first, the tiny tab at the top is the key, then they simply push directly into the 8pin slot. For a 6pin,you just fold the 2pin out of the way.
    Reply to Karadjgne
  10. Karadjgne said:
    Imagine an 8pin plug. Now split the actual connector into a 6pin and a 2pin. Same wires, fits on the same place as an 8pin,is identical in every way except it's modular, it'll work for a 6pin or an 8pin connection. Has a small key on the connector, so you add the 2 sides together first, then plug into the 8pin slot. Almost every psu made in the 400-800w range uses 6+2pin because the gpus are ranged from 6pin to 8+8pin but will most likely have a 6 or combination of 6 or like my Asus, a single 8. It's just a way to make a universal fit, no matter what the gpu. Above @800w, there's many units that have dedicated 8pin pcie simply because those units are intended for sli/crossfire use of the most powerful gpus all of which will most likely be using at least 1 8pin and either an 8 or 6pin secondary.

    So you'll not find anything under @800w with dedicated 8pin, they'll all be 6+2pin pcie.
    https://s11.postimg.org/x0an2w4yr/2017-07-07-17-25-10-.jpg

    The 2 fit together first, the tiny tab at the top is the key, then they simply push directly into the 8pin slot. For a 6pin,you just fold the 2pin out of the way.



    Thank you, this makes loads more sense to me...I'm sorry that I'm so uneducated about psu's XD, thanks for you patience here!
    So I read in another article that it's always a good idea to have 50-100w more than what your system requires...is that true, or should I get the 450w that you recommended?
    Reply to Mantha065
  11. Best answer
    It's a guessing game. Has to be simply because every user is different every pc is different, power requirements are different. I think of it in terms of max potential.
    100w for cpu
    100w for motherboard, fans, pretty much everything.
    Gtx960 can use upto @170w.

    Thats maxed out 370w, which never happens, even stress testing has a very hard time doing anything when the cpu is at 100% etc. So yes, it's quite fair to say a decent 450w is fine. Because average hard usage will be much closer to 250-300w at best. This'll leave a comfort zone of 150-200w, which keeps the psu right smack dab in the middle of the 50-70% power range, which is not only the most efficient range, but also the best running for the psu.
    But that's an average guess, just as with OC ppl tend to add an additional 100w to the psu. Whether it's fully utilized or not, or even under guessed. There's room to maneuver for individual differences.
    Reply to Karadjgne
  12. Karadjgne said:
    It's a guessing game. Has to be simply because every user is different every pc is different, power requirements are different. I think of it in terms of max potential.
    100w for cpu
    100w for motherboard, fans, pretty much everything.
    Gtx960 can use upto @170w.

    Thats maxed out 370w, which never happens, even stress testing has a very hard time doing anything when the cpu is at 100% etc. So yes, it's quite fair to say a decent 450w is fine. Because average hard usage will be much closer to 250-300w at best. This'll leave a comfort zone of 150-200w, which keeps the psu right smack dab in the middle of the 50-70% power range, which is not only the most efficient range, but also the best running for the psu.
    But that's an average guess, just as with OC ppl tend to add an additional 100w to the psu. Whether it's fully utilized or not, or even under guessed. There's room to maneuver for individual differences.


    Oookay. That helps me understand it better. Thanks again, I think I'll get the CXM450w!
    Reply to Mantha065
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