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Custom water cooling loop/high temps.

Okay, I've been water cooling for a while now, about 7 years and I've been having problems with the 6700k. I have a water cooling loop that goes through my cpu as well as my motherboard. Now considering the ambient temperatures in my room ( which I have monitored all the time by my CPU ) my cpu package is running at higher temperatures than I would prefer. I'm wondering if it's something I can fix. I have a EK supremecy EVO Elite water block. I've made sure that it's mounted the correct way ( yes they recommend an optimal way to mount it ) I also have the correct jet plate inserted in the block for my CPU right now I have two D5 pumps running in a tandum pump system to increase water pressure throughout the loop as the loop also goes through the PWM area of the motherboard, and finally through a top mounted radiatior with a push pull configuration using 6 Corsair Air Series SP120 120mm PWM High Performance Edition High Static Pressure Fans. It's a 360mm radiator: a black ice I believe, I've kept the radiator clean of dust as I remove and blow it out regularly.

Now when people are talking about temperatures and the temperatures they get I've realized that since it's a water cooling system without a external cooling element, that you cannot decrease your CPU or any of your components below room temperature. This is specifically why I keep a thermometer close to my computer as I realized that it's not as important how low your temperatures are, as opposed to what temperatures you're getting compared to ambient temperature.

Right now my computer is running 3 monitors. One is a gaming monitor an ASUS PG278QR 27" 1ms 165Hz G-SYNC Eye Care Gaming Screen LCD Monitor. This is my gaming monitor and it's connected too my graphics card. which is two MSI GeForce GTX 980 Ti GAMING 6G SLI'd together. My second monitor is an HP POS monitor I use for multi tasking while I'm gaming or coding or something in which it's convenient to have a second monitor in order too keep track of more shit. The HP is connected via a HDMI cable to my motherboard and runs off the onboard graphics core of my 6700k. The third monitor is also connected to my onboard graphics off my CPU and is a 55' samsung TV connected by a display port cable. I use the TV to stream and watch movies and the like.

Okay long story. Short version of how messed up I believe my temperatures to be. At Idle, or very near while streaming or playing video on my TV my temps are consistently 10 to 12 degrees Celsius above ambient. My cpu is over clocked to 4.6ghz which it runs at constantly, I've got my Vcore set to 1.275v. The problem is unless I drop my temperatures dramatically using air conditioning to about 18 degrees Celsius or 64 degrees Fahrenheit I can't even get it to pass Intel burn test or prime95 without going into the red zone ( 90 -95 degrees ). At current the ambient temperature in my room is 26 degrees celsius. My CPU package which shows on a two digit display on my mobo at all times is 38 celsius. The only thing I'm doing is typing this diatribe out and playing American Dad on my 55' TV. This seems very high for a custom water cooling loop and I'm not exactly sure how I can get it down.

To Sum up my build
Mobo: MSI Z170A GAMING M9 ACK
CPU: I7-6700k running at 4.6ghz consistently Vcore 1.275v
CPU water block: EK-Supremacy EVO Elite Edition - Intel 115x using Insert 1 and Jetplate 2
Thermal Paste: Shin-Etsu X23-7783D Silicone Thermal Compound
Graphics Cards: MSI GeForce GTX 980 Ti GAMING 6G x 2
Pumps: D5 x2 with two Drok step up converters 12v -24v synced in a Bitspower G 1/4 Thread Dual D5 Mod Top
Tubing: 1/2' diameter primochill tubing
Radiator: 1 x Black Ice® GTX Gen Two Xtreme 360 Highest Performance Radiator (GTX360)
Radiator Color Onyx Black top mounted with 6 Corsair Air Series SP120 120mm PWM High Performance Edition High Static Pressure Fans in a push pull configuration pulling air from outside the case.

If anyone has any suggestions or comments, I'd be interested in reading something about if my temps are too high compared to ambient room temp, or if there's something I can alter in my bios too bring my temps down. As you can see I've thrown a lot of cash at this bitch and it's not really working, there's something I'm missing and I haven't been able to figure it out. Or this is completely normal ( what I don't like is people post their temperatures, however they never include ambient room temperature ). If I lower my room temperature dramatically, under load I can top out at about 75 or 80 degrees which doesn't really add up to peoples posted temps. However I'm not sure if they're putting as much load on their CPU's graphics processor.
Reply to Jonboy_Fantastic
11 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about custom water cooling loop high temps
  1. The only two things that come to mind right off are reseat the block and check that you have good flow in your loop. You may want to look into delidding your 6700k. Because of the inherent risks I can't officially recommend it, but I've done it quite a few times and no duds yet, just go slow and careful each step of the way or look into a delidding tool, they're not all that expensive. It can drop your temps 8 - 10C, did for mine, you hear a lot of stories higher, but realistically 8 - 10 is pretty great. Also, make sure you're running the right Prime95. 26.6 is the one to look for, after that it adds stress to the processor that you'll never see in every day life, or so I hear, any way, on my old one 26.6 would sit at around 60C (33 or so above ambient), but the latest Prime would immediately hit 90 - 95. Get you some Thermal Grizzly, I think it's currently the best TIM on the market. There's a couple different ones made for regular, water, LN2, and conductive cooling. The water one is awesome, more than that is overkill.
    Reply to jossrik
  2. What is your case? Also why are you top mounting radiator but then pulling air in? What are your other chassis fans set to?
    Reply to Sedivy
  3. can you check your flow rate in any way?
    could you be able to tell if it has dropped considerably?

    is the base of the heatsink getting hot?
    could be poor connection and you just need to remount it.
    Reply to MadHacker
  4. Sedivy said:
    The only two things that come to mind right off are reseat the block and check that you have good flow in your loop. You may want to look into delidding your 6700k. Because of the inherent risks I can't officially recommend it, but I've done it quite a few times and no duds yet, just go slow and careful each step of the way or look into a delidding tool, they're not all that expensive. It can drop your temps 8 - 10C, did for mine, you hear a lot of stories higher, but realistically 8 - 10 is pretty great. Also, make sure you're running the right Prime95. 26.6 is the one to look for, after that it adds stress to the processor that you'll never see in every day life, or so I hear, any way, on my old one 26.6 would sit at around 60C (33 or so above ambient), but the latest Prime would immediately hit 90 - 95. Get you some Thermal Grizzly, I think it's currently the best TIM on the market. There's a couple different ones made for regular, water, LN2, and conductive cooling. The water one is awesome, more than that is overkill.


    As for Delidding my cpu I've done it before. Also although Intel says it fucks your warranty I RMA'd it and they sent me a new one on my last CPU. However I'm not just ready to tempt fate twice, as I resold that one a 4790k which helped me pay for most of my new CPU. As a delidded cpu that worked great and got better temps, it was basically unsellable on Ebay and the like. I got pretty much a new processor price for my RMA'd 4790k. I've worked out all the bubbles out of my case by picking up the full tower and shifting it as when you do so it works the air bubbles through the system and negates the pumps maximum pressure head. My case is huge though and super heavy and I hate cutting my line. As for the TIM I'll look into that. However I'm hesitant to buy another. As of current I have shin etsu micro, Arctic mx-2, Arctic mx-4, IC diamond, Gelid gc-extreme, cool laboratory liquid pro, cool laboratory liquid ultra, cool laboratory liquid metal pads, and two EK-TIM indigo XS, as well as various others that have come with random purchases.
    Reply to Jonboy_Fantastic
  5. Sedivy said:
    What is your case? Also why are you top mounting radiator but then pulling air in? What are your other chassis fans set to?
    My case is a Corsair 900D, the intake is top and back fans, the bottom and front fans are all outlet. The reason I have this setup is that my computer is placed close to my air conditioner ( about 3 ft ) and intake from the top adds a cooling element when I turn on my AC. All my fans are Corsair Air Series SP120 120mm PWM High Performance Edition High Static Pressure Fans, except for the rear fan which is a 140mm same model. In total I have 18 fans. Two are mounted on my hard drive cage to keep airflow running over my graphics cards. Also the reason I've top mounted is in the 900d it's the most obvious place to set a radiator that large inside the case. As for why it's an intake rather than an outlet I just switched that around, the reasoning being even though hot air rises the air from inside the case, produced by all my components, is hotter than the air outside the case. So using fan placement I'm trying to reverse the physics of airflow.
    Reply to Jonboy_Fantastic
  6. MadHacker said:
    can you check your flow rate in any way?
    could you be able to tell if it has dropped considerably?

    is the base of the heatsink getting hot?
    could be poor connection and you just need to remount it.




    One thing I've not yet invested in is a flowmeter. As for the outlet in my reservoir the flow looks pretty consistent and strong. As for the heatsink, it's not even warm, from base to top. Nor is the back, hot to the touch, or even that warm, it's warmer than the block however not 40 degrees Celsius warm. I think I'll try remounting it, the connections are tight ( not too tight, they're finger screwed on until I'm unable to get them tighter without using tools, if that makes sense ).
    Reply to Jonboy_Fantastic
  7. Ok the trouble is you're taking warm air, and you're forcing it out the bottom sides and front. You also are forcing a lot of it out the back via the power supplies. Now when that air exits the case, it rises, to be then sucked back in by your top and side exhausts, thus looping the warm air back in and cutting back on the cooling performance. You also have overall negative pressure, and while this is more of a dust issue usually, in your case, air that due to negative pressure comes into the case from the back open cutout holes (only place without an active fan), is actually warm air that just got blown out of the power supply. It's a terrible airflow design and that's the reason why cases are always designed from bottom front (far away from power supply exhausts), to top back (no crossover between warm and cool air). Where you're keeping this case (usually a case this big is on the floor, underneath a desk which further traps air in and cuts off circulation) will also matter so try elevating it and not having it boxed in in any way.
    Reply to Sedivy
  8. Sedivy said:
    Ok the trouble is you're taking warm air, and you're forcing it out the bottom sides and front. You also are forcing a lot of it out the back via the power supplies. Now when that air exits the case, it rises, to be then sucked back in by your top and side exhausts, thus looping the warm air back in and cutting back on the cooling performance. You also have overall negative pressure, and while this is more of a dust issue usually, in your case, air that due to negative pressure comes into the case from the back open cutout holes (only place without an active fan), is actually warm air that just got blown out of the power supply. It's a terrible airflow design and that's the reason why cases are always designed from bottom front (far away from power supply exhausts), to top back (no crossover between warm and cool air). Where you're keeping this case (usually a case this big is on the floor, underneath a desk which further traps air in and cuts off circulation) will also matter so try elevating it and not having it boxed in in any way.


    Respectfully noted but I disagree. Though I do have negative pressure, my case is on a desk elevated 3 ft off the floor. The back 140mm fan pulls in from the back, I have a corsair power supply which exhausts out the side of the case, not the back and it's located at the bottom, about 1 1/2 ft below the intake. The major intake is the top Which is unimpeded by anything. Thermodynamics aside that would account for more things than just my cpu being over heated. My graphics cards run fine under load as well as my mobo. The major exhaust is out of the sides of the bottom of the case, which is how the case is designed. If it does create a convection current, it's small, and much less than the benefit I get from cooling the rad with my air conditioner. If my heat issues were more universal it would warrant a new design for pulling the air in or out of my case however I don't believe that airflow is a problem.
    Reply to Jonboy_Fantastic
  9. I did remove the thermal grease from my cpu and cooler. I replaced it with liquid pro ultra which seemed to get my temperatures down about 5 degrees under load using intel burn test however the package temp is still elevated at near idle. For some reason I have my ratio in bios set to dynamic and EIST enabled however my cpu is not speedsteping, according to everything; HW64, CPU-Z, etc. I'm not sure why the ratio is fixed instead of speedsteping like it should.

    I think I'm just gonna cut my loop and remove the PWM on my motherboard from the loop entirely, it doesn't have heat issues and creates not only an elbow but a large restriction in flow through the design.

    Got the EIST, didn't realize they set it to windows power scheme and razer was taking it over.
    Reply to Jonboy_Fantastic
  10. Quote:
    I have a corsair power supply which exhausts out the side of the case, not the back and it's located at the bottom, about 1 1/2 ft below the intake.

    Er...I went off of the system specs for this from the corsair page. They show space for up to two psu's, both installed on their sides, pulling the air in from the side with a fan and exhausting out the back as the back cutouts are adjusted for this config. Is this not how you have your psu?

    As for theory and thermodynamics, I've been wrong in my theories before but nothing beats experimentation. I'd tell you to try swapping things around and try it out yourself in different configurations if you were using AIOs and test the temps yourself, but this is no easy feat in a custom liquid cool setup.
    Reply to Sedivy
  11. Best answer
    Couple of questions and issues here - most of which I believe to be centered around the overclock. Firstly, OC and voltage increase will always raise your temps, both idle and load, there isn't a way around this because you're forcing the CPU to produce more heat due to clock speeds and voltage per tick. Also, is it really necessary to watercool your motherboard? I typically recommend not doing this because not much is to be gained from this and you can encounter flow restriction that is not needed.

    Also, reported temps via temp reporting vs. ambient is now how delta is defined - delta is defined by water temperature vs. ambient temperature. So, that being said, this isn't an accurate representation of your delta, but it seems in-line with your overclock.

    Have you tried setting your CPU back to stock speeds and voltages and working your way up to your overclock from there? Also, is your overclock defined by an automatic % or increase or manually in the BIOS?
    Reply to rubix_1011
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