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HELP NEEDED! Pc crashes when overclocking temps fine.

Hi, I'm 15 and built a pc at Christmas. I went for a budget build and ended up not getting an as great a cpu as I would have liked, so after some googling I decided the best option was overclocking. I bought the cooler master hyper 103 and went to work. I got to 3900MHz and speedfan and another program both said I was under 40C when using prime 95 so I increased the OC to 4000MHz then my Pc would just crash despite the apparent low temperatures. I want to try get the most out of my cpu for gaming, are these programs wrong or what because I'm confused and worried that I'm running at very high temperatures?

Pc specs:
-8GB (2x4GB) Corsair Vengeance Blue Low Profile 1600MHz CL9 DDR3 Dual/Quad Channel Kit
- GIGABYTE GA-78LMT-USB3 AMD 760G (Socket AM3+) Micro-ATX Motherboard
-AMD (Piledriver) FX-6300 3.50GHz (4.10GHz Turbo) Socket AM3+ 6-Core Processor - Retail
-Thermaltake TR2 Challenger 500W 80+ Certified APFC Power Supply OEM
-Thermaltake Versa H23 Midi Mesh Tower Case USB3 Blue ODD Bays With Side Window
- 250GB Samsung 750 EVO Series Solid State Drive - MZ-750250BW
-Asus GeForce GTX1050 Expedition 2GB Graphics Card

Thanks for any help!

Update: got a message pop up that said scanning and repairing hard drive and another after saying windows couldn't load properly.
Reply to Finiesta
26 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about needed crashes overclocking temps fine
  1. Sounds like the CPU needs more voltage. Now adding voltage is going cause some major heat increases. Take it slow and only step up the cpu voltage the smallest amount.
    Reply to elbert
  2. Sounds like normal overclocking stability issues and elbert is right likely more voltage will help. More voltage doesn't always help sometimes you will be at the CPU's limit, well unless you have some liquid nitrogen laying around.

    This is the best guide I know of for this CPU architecture for overclocking:
    http://www.overclock.net/t/1348623/amd-bulldozer-and-piledriver-overclocking-guide-asus-motherboard
    Reply to JamesSneed
  3. Hey,
    1) There's simply NO WAY that you are under 40degC when running Prime95. That's either an ERROR or you're looking at the wrong sensor data.

    Perhaps use CORE TEMP. I think the max temp to aim for is about 70degC for those AMD CPU's.

    2) The CPU already turbos to 4.1GHz, so I'm not sure your overclock makes much sense. Unless you have a very GOOD COOLER (not stock) and intend to clock to well OVER 4GHz (i.e. 4.4GHz) there's not much point overclocking.

    3) Your motherboard and power supply can also affect the reliability of the overclock.
    Reply to photonboy
  4. Other:
    Please note that the MAXIMUM FPS increase you can get is proportional to the CPU overclock amount. For example, if under load it settles to 3.8GHz (there are different Turbo levels) then a 4.2GHz clock during gaming would be needed to increase FPS by 10%.

    Which would raise the FPS by 50FPS to 55FPS if the CPU was the ONLY bottleneck at that moment. So it's not a MASSIVE gaming difference.

    *Now, depending on the game (and game settings) you may not even have a CPU bottleneck.

    So again, a light overclock (if you have a good CPU cooler) is fine but your best gains in gaming are probably going to be from properly TWEAKING the game settings.

    Here's an example of how to properly TWEAK a game like Assassin's Creed (again, one example):

    1) run FRAPS or other FPS indicator (Steam has one too)
    2) start game
    3) turn VSYNC OFF
    4) adjust game Resolution (i.e. 1920x1080), AA (i.e. 2xMSAA), and other game quality settings until you get the best visual benefit whilst maintaining at least 60FPS (for 60Hz monitor) about 90% of the time

    5) then force on Adaptive VSYNC (NVidia Control Panel-> manage 3d settings-> .. add game.. adaptive VSYNC-> SAVE)

    6) TEST: should then run at locked 60FPS VSYNC ON most of the time, but if it can't maintain 60FPS VSYNC then turns off (which causes screen tearing, but not the added STUTTERING that VSYNC can cause if you can't maintain the proper FPS to match the monitor Hz rate).
    Reply to photonboy
  5. LOAD ERROR FOR WINDOWS?
    For now, I would do the following:
    a) stick with default CPU/Memory settings (don't overclock)
    b) run MEMTEST86 for a full pass www.memtest86.com
    c) reinstall Windows if errors persist
    d) run full HD diagnostics (see HDD manufacturer site for software)
    Reply to photonboy
  6. Shouldn't even be overclocking on a 760G motherboard, it's a 4 + 1 phase design.
    Also, as other people said, overclocking will not be efficient, because your CPU turbos to 4.1Ghz.
    I'd say overclocking below 4.5Ghz won't give you a noticeable difference, because of the low IPC of the CPU.
    You should've asked here before purchasing that 6 year old CPU.
    Reply to lakimens
  7. lakimens said:
    Shouldn't even be overclocking on a 760G motherboard, it's a 4 + 1 phase design.
    Also, as other people said, overclocking will not be efficient, because your CPU turbos to 4.1Ghz.
    I'd say overclocking below 4.5Ghz won't give you a noticeable difference, because of the low IPC of the CPU.
    You should've asked here before purchasing that 6 year old CPU.


    The CPU isn't horrible though, and if it gets you to 60FPS in a particular game that may be all you need. Games are also becoming more threaded so the six cores it has will do better as time goes on.

    DOOM in particular is a great representation of how a well crafted VULKAN or DX12 game can look and run great even on lower-end hardware.

    As for the OC, his motherboard can handle a light overclock since it's likely designed to run an FX-8350 that requires over 30% more power. As for the performance impact, I already discussed what to expect above.

    Finally, there are many games that will run and look good on that system. I wouldn't necessarily attempt to run demanding games, especially if your CPU spec is near the minimum recommended. But plenty of newer and older games that look good and play great.

    (and again, it's also about TWEAKING the game as discussed above)
    Reply to photonboy
  8. Core Temp was written for Intel cpu's, the only somewhat reliable temp software for amd cpus is amd Overdrive.
    There's a sensor or software malfunction somewhere, not uncommon on those FX cpus, because it's almost guaranteed that a hyper 103 can't handle a 95w cpu under Prime95 with all 6 cores running 100%, nevermind running at 40°C, which will be right about idle temps. It's a 140w TDP cooler at best, putting it right up alongside the Noctua NH-D9L, basically a really good stock replacement cooler but not really capable of the exaggerated heat at 6x cores at 100% loads.

    Yes, that 760G is rated to handle the 125w 8 core FX, one of the few, after bios revision. Yrs, all the FX suffer @2/3rds the IPC of comparable Intel cpu's, so do suffer in single thread heavy games like skyrim or cs:go, but can make up that difference in multiple thread games where IPC isn't as much a priority as thread count. Of course a good OC of @4.5GHz or better will actually help in both counts.

    Max core temp for the fx is 62°C, but since amd doesn't have the same accuracy with core temp readings that Intel does, it's pretty much impossible to go by that number, instead relying on package temp which'll run in the mid 70's before thermal throttling becomes an issue. Because of lack of software accuracy, this makes Overdrive a better solution as it'll read how much temp is left before ***t hits the fan, closer to 0 = hotter cpu.

    At 4GHz OC, you shouldn't need more than factory stock voltages on vcore, to me the issue seems more like the FSB is too high for the ram and putting the ram too far over its speed limits. I'd downclock the ram to 1333MHz before OC, but leave the 9-9-9-24 timings as is, not setting them lower for the 1333 normal timings.
    Reply to Karadjgne
  9. elbert said:
    Sounds like the CPU needs more voltage. Now adding voltage is going cause some major heat increases. Take it slow and only step up the cpu voltage the smallest amount.


    I have overlocked stably at 4GHz with the voltage increase but i cant seem to get higher as my pc crashes even though i have increased the voltage and i dont feel comfortable increasing it too much so ill leave it there. Getting it to 4GHz though has significantly increased my gaming performance though despite me having the turbo on. I may come back to this again in the future when i have great knowledge of what im doing. Thank you for all the help heres my speedfan results for 4GHz:
    http://imgur.com/a/LMuBk
    Reply to Finiesta
  10. Your motherboard supports upto the FX-8370 boost 4.3Ghz so the 6300 should atleast do 4.3Ghz. Check your bios version and see if you need a update. Here is a link to the motherboard which has 3 versions. Pick yours and click on support to the right so you can find the correct bios update.
    https://www.gigabyte.com/Motherboard/GA-78LMT-USB3-rev-60#ov

    This said 4Ghz is a good overclock if your fine with the results. Also you may need a small increase to NB voltage instead of CPU at times. That is if the integrated memory controller isn't stable.
    Reply to elbert
  11. Well 4Ghz may just be the max stable OC for this chip. Its kind of a lottery on how perfect the chip is made which dictates how well it will OC.

    From everything you have said I would go back to 4Ghz and start reducing voltage in small increments until you get stability issues then bump the voltage back up one step. That way you can get 4Ghz with the least amount of extra voltage.
    Reply to JamesSneed
  12. Why OC a chip to 4.0 when is has a 4.1 boost? Is there a legitimate reason for doing this?
    Reply to F3KINGchris
  13. F3KINGchris said:
    Why OC a chip to 4.0 when is has a 4.1 boost? Is there a legitimate reason for doing this?

    The Ryzen review overlocked the 1800X to 4Ghz and beats the stock 1800X which can boost to 4.1Ghz with XFR. In the old days some CPU's you could glitch and lock the CPU to the boost but now the clock is all over the place. Thus you can can get a bit better better performance out of 4Ghz than one with a base of 3.6 but boosts to 4.1Ghz.
    Reply to elbert
  14. That board will handle upto 1.4v without complaint with a 6300.
    I've never seen a 6300 that won't hit 4.2ghz with less voltage than that.

    The hyper 103 is also a far better cooler than some of you think.


    How ate you overclocking exactly ? I assume you're being sensible & just using the multiplier & not touching fsb or ram speeds ??

    & its absolutely true that a 6300@4ghz base with no turbo will perform better than stock (the turbo on the fx chips does not happen on all cores , just on a couple & the clocks non the remaining cores are dropped lower to compensate)
    6 cores@4ghz will vastly outperform 2 cores@4.1 & 4cores @3.2 which is what actually happens.
    Reply to madmatt30
  15. Amd has an advantage over Intel. When it comes to OC, either amd has downplayed core speeds, or their way of using the silicon is more inline with its properties because the cpu lottery has a much broader spectrum than Intel. I've yet to find an AMD fx that won't OC past 4.2/4.3 easily. Many will hit 4.5GHz and not break a sweat, I've seen ppl with fx4100 hit 5.2GHz. My i5 reaches 4.3 and that's it, no further, either on my msi or Asus boards, no matter what gimmicks or tricks I try. This is not uncommon for Intel. So an fx that's stumped at 4.0GHz is somewhat anethema.
    Reply to Karadjgne
  16. F3KINGchris said:
    Why OC a chip to 4.0 when is has a 4.1 boost? Is there a legitimate reason for doing this?


    The boost doesn't boost all cores only one or two cores get boosted the other cores will be at stock. You might read over that OC guide I posted and see if some things in there help get it stable. Good luck.
    Reply to JamesSneed
  17. madmatt30 said:
    That board will handle upto 1.4v without complaint with a 6300.
    I've never seen a 6300 that won't hit 4.2ghz with less voltage than that.

    The hyper 103 is also a far better cooler than some of you think.


    How ate you overclocking exactly ? I assume you're being sensible & just using the multiplier & not touching fsb or ram speeds ??

    & its absolutely true that a 6300@4ghz base with no turbo will perform better than stock (the turbo on the fx chips does not happen on all cores , just on a couple & the clocks non the remaining cores are dropped lower to compensate)
    6 cores@4ghz will vastly outperform 2 cores@4.1 & 4cores @3.2 which is what actually happens.


    Yeah, just the multiplier. All I am trying to do is up the clock speed.
    Reply to Finiesta
  18. 1.38v will get you past 4ghz without a doubt
    Likely 4.2ghz.

    You could probably do it with less voltage but its a safe enough figure to try as a starter & work your way back down.
    Reply to madmatt30
  19. Okay so next I need to know what each of the temps in Speen Fan are for in this:
    http://imgur.com/a/LMuBk
    I was just unsure as temp3 wasnt going up with the OC.
    Reply to Finiesta
  20. Use amd overdrive mate , its far more accurate with its thermal margin readout.
    Bear in mind this is a countdown from thermal limit so above 0c is OK, ideally above 10c under stress testing.

    Temp 3 on there is probably nothing at all.
    Reply to madmatt30
  21. madmatt30 said:
    Use amd overdrive mate , its far more accurate with its thermal margin readout.
    Bear in mind this is a countdown from thermal limit so above 0c is OK, ideally above 10c under stress testing.

    Temp 3 on there is probably nothing at all.


    I installed AMD Overdrive and ran it with prime95 and it said the thermal margin was 35 lowest so im going to try to increase the OC
    Reply to Finiesta
  22. So after increasing the NB and CPU voltage to the next level i got the OC to 4.2GHz, but as soon as i went to 4.3GHz I got errors on prime95 and windows was crashing so I increased both voltages again but these errors persisted so I have just left it at 4.2GHz. The temperatures were fine with the temperature margin rarely dropping below 30C.
    Reply to Finiesta
  23. Good. Just be aware that your system may not be completely stable even though it appears so. If you keep getting unexplained errors such as crashes or just weird errors that may mean an unstable CPU.

    CORETEMP:
    I don't have AMD so I can't verify if this works properly or not though it appears you tried other software. Just FYI the Core Temp page says it works with FX CPU's so I'm unsure if it works or not. It's common for software like this to get updated over time.

    OC and TURBO?
    A question was raised above about why you would bother overclocking when TURBO is already 4.1GHz. A very good question. The answer is that 4.1GHz is the MAX TURBO value. Depending on the load the clock speed will usually sit between 3.5GHz and 4.1GHz. 4.1GHz is probably for only one main core used, so a more heavy gaming load may be closer to 3.7 or 3.8GHz.

    (CPU's can clock below 3.5GHz too for very light loads)

    So if we assume it hits 3.8GHz for gaming normally at stock settings AND that your overclock is instead 4.2GHz in the same scenario your boost in FPS can be up to 10% higher such as 55FPS instead of 50FPS. It depends on how much of a CPU bottleneck is but if you have any bottleneck at all it will help UP TO that amount.
    Reply to photonboy
  24. photonboy said:
    Good. Just be aware that your system may not be completely stable even though it appears so. If you keep getting unexplained errors such as crashes or just weird errors that may mean an unstable CPU.

    CORETEMP:
    I don't have AMD so I can't verify if this works properly or not though it appears you tried other software. Just FYI the Core Temp page says it works with FX CPU's so I'm unsure if it works or not. It's common for software like this to get updated over time.

    OC and TURBO?
    A question was raised above about why you would bother overclocking when TURBO is already 4.1GHz. A very good question. The answer is that 4.1GHz is the MAX TURBO value. Depending on the load the clock speed will usually sit between 3.5GHz and 4.1GHz. 4.1GHz is probably for only one main core used, so a more heavy gaming load may be closer to 3.7 or 3.8GHz.

    (CPU's can clock below 3.5GHz too for very light loads)

    So if we assume it hits 3.8GHz for gaming normally at stock settings AND that your overclock is instead 4.2GHz in the same scenario your boost in FPS can be up to 10% higher such as 55FPS instead of 50FPS. It depends on how much of a CPU bottleneck is but if you have any bottleneck at all it will help UP TO that amount.




    I can easily say without a doubt that the OC has had a HUGE difference in performance, I've been using Total war: warhammer to see the effects it has had and before I would struggle to stay above 60 fps with 2 armies fighting (usually around 40fps) now I rarely drop below 60, giving around a 20fps increase altogether showing that the turbo really inst effective.

    If i increase the voltage by 2 more level will that allow me to possibly go for a 4.4GHz OC or is it something else causing it to crash at that speed?
    Reply to Finiesta
  25. Best answer
    1) I'm happy your OC helps, but there's simply no way it's helping as much as 50% or so improvement unless there was some very, very odd issue causing your CPU frequency to plummet under 3GHz whilst gaming then maintain 4.2GHz or so with the OC.

    You can't increase the FPS more than the amount of the overclock. If you overclock by 10% you can't achieve more than a 10% FPS boost. (it's slightly more complicated as Windows uses some resources but even if there was some core conflict that's not ideal a 10% boost still wouldn't be that significant)

    2) 4.4GHz OC?
    There are several factors that prevent a higher overclock from being stable so it's hard to answer. This includes:
    a) power supply quality
    b) power delivery from motherboard VRM's
    c) silicon lottery for the CPU
    d) temperature
    e) BIOS settings related to overclocking

    Increasing the voltage will increase the temperature, and will also increase the power draw, and of course the increased frequency (and voltage) affect the CPU so it can be difficult to say which exact issue is preventing the overclock (barring swapping the PSU and motherboard which doesn't make sense).

    I never, ever recommend pushing an overclock right to the limit. For one thing ALL electronic chips degrade over time so the closer you get to the limit the sooner the chip will be unstable. It's also difficult to be certain if it even IS stable as passing every test you can think of is no guarantee it's completely stable. You need WEEKS of usage to ascertain that (i.e. no errors).

    I recommend you don't push the overclock any farther.

    *If it's 4.4GHz vs 4.2GHz that's also LESS than a 5% difference which as I discussed above can at MOST affect the FPS by under 5%. Let's say at MOST it is 4% or 52FPS instead of 50FPS.

    Is 52FPS vs 50FPS worth the hassle and potential stability issues?
    Reply to photonboy
  26. I'll agree with photonboy here.
    There is a topping point non fx chips whereby once you hit a certain clock speed the voltage required to go a step further becomes unacceptable for the performance boost you'll get by actually upping the clock.

    That tipping point is usually 4.2/4.3ghz & I think you're at that stage now.

    Bearing in mind that's a cheap old $50 760g board not a $100 overclocking board I would be happy with what you've got now.
    4.2ghz is a nice clock speed to be at at the end of the day.
    Reply to madmatt30
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