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AMD Undervolting, how to find the -##mV using Wattman?

I see other people saying they've undervolted their cards by so and so negative mili volt number, but in Wattman theres no way to really find that amount like with MSI Afterburner (move slider and it clearly shows -##mV)
Am I thinking too hard on this or is there some maths I'm just not seeing.
I Undervolted my R9 Nano by a considerable amount and cannot figure out if I'm in the norm, or I can go lower, I've found a bunch of other people Fury card UV results, would like to just compare.
Reply to HyeVltg3
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  1. Best answer
    I look at my GPU voltage under load at stock settings using a utility like GPU-Z or HWiNFO64. Then I undervolt in Wattman and repeat. I take the difference between the stock and undervolted GPU core measurement as my "-xx mV" undervolt.
    Reply to TJ Hooker
  2. TJ Hooker said:
    I look at my GPU voltage under load at stock settings using a utility like GPU-Z or HWiNFO64. Then I undervolt in Wattman and repeat. I take the difference between the stock and undervolted GPU core measurement as my "-xx mV" undervolt.


    Well gee I'm a idiot. I was thinking of using HWInfo, reset Wattman to stock and then get the "max", but the max was a bit off in that it would jump to some high number then drop down to a stable number while I ran Unigine Heaven.
    Its just for some odd reason I thought this was the incorrect way, or there was a better way.
    Reply to HyeVltg3
  3. Yeah, you'd think there'd be a better way (and maybe there is), but that's what I found works for me.

    Regarding voltage jumping around at stock: it's normal for it to fluctuate a bit, although it seems a little odd that it'd jump up and then drop under load. But what I usually do is start a benchmark (i.e. Heaven), wait a moment for things to settle, reset the statistics in HWinfo (restarts the averaging), then let it run for a little bit and look at the average value.

    One other thing I found is that at stock settings my RX 480 hits the power limit causing it to throttle a bit, which causes the voltage (and frequency) to bounce around more. So I increase the power limit to get a stable 'stock voltage' measurement. Not sure if this is relevant to you though.
    Reply to TJ Hooker
  4. TJ Hooker said:
    Yeah, you'd think there'd be a better way (and maybe there is), but that's what I found works for me.

    Regarding voltage jumping around at stock: it's normal for it to fluctuate a bit, although it seems a little odd that it'd jump up and then drop under load. But what I usually do is start a benchmark (i.e. Heaven), wait a moment for things to settle, reset the statistics in HWinfo (restarts the averaging), then let it run for a little bit and look at the average value.

    One other thing I found is that at stock settings my RX 480 hits the power limit causing it to throttle a bit, which causes the voltage (and frequency) to bounce around more. So I increase the power limit to get a stable 'stock voltage' measurement. Not sure if this is relevant to you though.


    Yes, relevant, other UVers mentioned having to set Power limit to +45-50%.
    aiming for the "common" 1050/500 Fury-X stock clocks, but with an undervolt to lower temps and increase lifespan, just bought a used R9 Nano, from 11/2015, so would like to use it till maybe Vega refresh (because, we all know its going to come after Vega, haha).
    Reply to HyeVltg3
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