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HELP NEEDED!! WANT TO MAKE SURE I AM GETTING A PC AND THE PARTS WILL ALL WORK TOGETHER (first time)

Looking to a pc that can handle most games at medium to high setting with an average of 60 fps
my price range is MAX $630
i live in Australia and i have already put together a pc
i just want to make that it can run most games at med to high setting average 60 fps
and that the parts are compatible

Link:https://au.pcpartpicker.com/list/TLGRXH
Reply to Provility
7 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about needed make parts work time
  1. 2 things.

    RAM you want 2 sticks so it can run in dual channel mode. Buying 8gb now and 8gb later is not a good idea either as RAM should be bought as matched sets to ensure it will work without problems. Get 2x4gb.

    That PSU is really poor quality. Can you get one of the Corsair CX450M instead. Make sure its the grey label 450w and not the older 430w with a green label.
    Reply to sizzling
  2. sizzling said:
    2 things.

    RAM you want 2 sticks so it can run in dual channel mode. Buying 8gb now and 8gb later is not a good idea either as RAM should be bought as matched sets to ensure it will work without problems. Get 2x4gb.

    That PSU is really poor quality. Can you get one of the Corsair CX450M instead. Make sure its the grey label 450w and not the older 430w with a green label.


    I agree with you on one point and disagree with you on another. The VS line of power supplies are not trustworthy. Don't buy.
    However for the RAM, buying 1 x 8gb is the better choice in a build like this. RAM is generally quite robust in my experience, however you will want to buy the same kit that you bought the first time if you want to upgrade to 16gb. Dual channel memory vs single channel doesn't make an appreciable difference, and most builders, such as linus, will choose single channel RAM for a budget build.
    Also, what is your opinion about buying used? You can get some great deals on Gumtree! I live in Melbourne, so this example is in Melbourne, https://www.gumtree.com.au/s-ad/wantirna/components/2-x-msi-twin-frozriii-gtx-680oc/1150109368
    http://gpu.userbenchmark.com/Compare/Nvidia-GTX-680-vs-Nvidia-GTX-1050/3148vs3650

    It is 2 680s, for slightly more than 1 1050. Assuming a 1.5x scaling factor for SLI, it will beat the 1050 by over 50%! You could even just buy 1 for $110 and save, while still beating the 1050 in terms of performance. Of course there are other factors at play too here. You need to pick it up and often they do not have warranties, however I am personally running a GTX 960 which I got 8 months ago for $120.
    The other factor, of course, is power consumption, however if you, say, got 1 680 for $110, you would be able to get a significantly more reliable power supply with a higher wattage (it might even be modular or semi-modular), in addition to the ~30% performance gains.
    Reply to Lehan123456789
  3. sizzling said:
    RAM you want 2 sticks so it can run in dual channel mode. Buying 8gb now and 8gb later is not a good idea either as RAM should be bought as matched sets to ensure it will work without problems. Get 2x4gb.


    In real world applications and games, you are not likely to encounter any significant performance difference between single and dual channel memory, unless you are using integrated graphics, which can benefit from the additional bandwidth. With a dedicated graphics card, performance using RAM running in single channel mode will be almost identical to that of RAM running in dual channel mode. There might be a difference of 1 fps or so in some titles, but it's not anything you would likely notice while playing the game.

    If the selected motherboard had 4 RAM slots, I would say to go with 2 sticks to get that extra bit of performance, but with only 2 RAM slots, a single stick is probably better for future upgrades. Currently, most games see little to no benefit from having more than 8GB of RAM, but within a couple years you'll start to see a lot more games recommending more, at which point having a free slot available should make for a less expensive upgrade, since you won't have to replace your existing RAM to add more. So it's probably best to either stick with one stick of RAM for now, or find another compatible motherboard with 4 slots.

    Anonymous said:
    It is 2 680s, for slightly more than 1 1050. Assuming a 1.5x scaling factor for SLI, it will beat the 1050 by over 50%! You could even just buy 1 for $110 and save, while still beating the 1050 in terms of performance. Of course there are other factors at play too here. You need to pick it up and often they do not have warranties, however I am personally running a GTX 960 which I got 8 months ago for $120.
    The other factor, of course, is power consumption, however if you, say, got 1 680 for $110, you would be able to get a significantly more reliable power supply with a higher wattage (it might even be modular or semi-modular), in addition to the ~30% performance gains.


    The additional power consumption and heat output would be less than ideal on an SLI setup like that. Plus, of course, his selected motherboard doesn't even support SLI. : P Even if it did though, being older cards, each GTX 680 would draw up to around 200 watts under load, and combined would make for a rather noisy, power-hungry system. Plus there are plenty of games that don't support SLI, or don't support it well. Having one GTX 680 (or other prior-generation card of comparable performance) might not be bad though, especially if it could be found for less used.

    However, whatever the card, I think that looking for one with 4GB (or maybe even 3GB) of VRAM might be a good idea, as there are already some games that can see a significant performance hit with only 2GB, and that will only get worse in the games coming out next year, or the year after. For a primarily gaming-centered system, it might even be worth passing on the SSD for now to help you move up to a higher-end graphics card. An SSD may help make load times more tolerable, and the system a bit more responsive outside of gaming, but they won't actually do much to help frame rates. And the prices of SSDs are relatively high right now due to a flash memory shortage, so waiting another six months or so to add an SSD might get you more capacity for the money as well.
    Reply to cryoburner
  4. Best answer
    cryoburner said:
    sizzling said:
    RAM you want 2 sticks so it can run in dual channel mode. Buying 8gb now and 8gb later is not a good idea either as RAM should be bought as matched sets to ensure it will work without problems. Get 2x4gb.


    In real world applications and games, you are not likely to encounter any significant performance difference between single and dual channel memory, unless you are using integrated graphics, which can benefit from the additional bandwidth. With a dedicated graphics card, performance using RAM running in single channel mode will be almost identical to that of RAM running in dual channel mode. There might be a difference of 1 fps or so in some titles, but it's not anything you would likely notice while playing the game.

    If the selected motherboard had 4 RAM slots, I would say to go with 2 sticks to get that extra bit of performance, but with only 2 RAM slots, a single stick is probably better for future upgrades. Currently, most games see little to no benefit from having more than 8GB of RAM, but within a couple years you'll start to see a lot more games recommending more, at which point having a free slot available should make for a less expensive upgrade, since you won't have to replace your existing RAM to add more. So it's probably best to either stick with one stick of RAM for now, or find another compatible motherboard with 4 slots.

    Anonymous said:
    It is 2 680s, for slightly more than 1 1050. Assuming a 1.5x scaling factor for SLI, it will beat the 1050 by over 50%! You could even just buy 1 for $110 and save, while still beating the 1050 in terms of performance. Of course there are other factors at play too here. You need to pick it up and often they do not have warranties, however I am personally running a GTX 960 which I got 8 months ago for $120.
    The other factor, of course, is power consumption, however if you, say, got 1 680 for $110, you would be able to get a significantly more reliable power supply with a higher wattage (it might even be modular or semi-modular), in addition to the ~30% performance gains.


    The additional power consumption and heat output would be less than ideal on an SLI setup like that. Plus, of course, his selected motherboard doesn't even support SLI. : P Even if it did though, being older cards, each GTX 680 would draw up to around 200 watts under load, and combined would make for a rather noisy, power-hungry system. Plus there are plenty of games that don't support SLI, or don't support it well. Having one GTX 680 (or other prior-generation card of comparable performance) might not be bad though, especially if it could be found for less used.

    However, whatever the card, I think that looking for one with 4GB (or maybe even 3GB) of VRAM might be a good idea, as there are already some games that can see a significant performance hit with only 2GB, and that will only get worse in the games coming out next year, or the year after. For a primarily gaming-centered system, it might even be worth passing on the SSD for now to help you move up to a higher-end graphics card. An SSD may help make load times more tolerable, and the system a bit more responsive outside of gaming, but they won't actually do much to help frame rates. And the prices of SSDs are relatively high right now due to a flash memory shortage, so waiting another six months or so to add an SSD might get you more capacity for the money as well.


    Thanks for the feedback on SLI (I completely forgot that the motherboard didn't support it!). About the VRAM concerns, at this price you are looking at a GTX 1050, which only has 2gb VRAM anyways :( . BTW that listing did say 1 670 for $110 (which still outperforms the 1050 for less money) also that was an example, and much better deals can be had (provided you are willing to search for a while and perhaps wait for one to come up (I got a 960 for $120).

    Thank you for your help!
    Reply to Lehan123456789
  5. for $630AUD

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel - Celeron G3900 2.8GHz Dual-Core Processor ($55.00 @ Mwave Australia)
    Motherboard: MSI - B150M BAZOOKA Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($69.00 @ Centre Com)
    Memory: Crucial - 8GB (2 x 4GB) DDR4-2133 Memory ($85.00 @ Umart)
    Storage: Western Digital - Caviar Blue 1TB 3.5" 7200RPM Internal Hard Drive ($63.00 @ Shopping Express)
    Video Card: Zotac - GeForce GTX 1050 Ti 4GB Mini Video Card ($209.00 @ Scorptec)
    Case: Silverstone - PS08B (Black) MicroATX Mid Tower Case ($45.00 @ Umart)
    Power Supply: XFX - TS 550W 80+ Bronze Certified ATX Power Supply ($89.00 @ PCCaseGear)
    Total: $615.00
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-06-06 19:00 AEST+1000
    Reply to -HH-
  6. -HH- said:


    That Celeron doesn't have Hyperthreading though, in addition to being slower overall. A lot of newer games are getting more multithreaded, so for a gaming system, you probably wouldn't want to cheap out with an even lower-end processor. The G4560 offers rather good performance for its low price range, so for a budget gaming system, it's probably the best choice at the moment.

    Really, I think the OP's build was pretty good as it was, again, with the possible exception that for a gaming system, it might be better to hold off on buying an SSD for now, and put the money toward moving up to a slightly better graphics card. It should only be around $40 AUD more to move up to a 4GB 1050 Ti, after all, and that's likely to behave better in games that require more VRAM. Or some comparable or better graphics card on the used market, as Lehan suggested.
    Reply to cryoburner
  7. Yeah I mean i sacrificed the hyperthreading on the CPU for an SSD but it shouldn't hit gaming performance as much as dropping to a 1050 would but that's gaming performance.
    Reply to -HH-
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