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Ryzen 5 Thermals Overclocking Problem

Hey guys. So I have bough a ryzen 5 1600 about 3 weeks ago. In my UEFI, from MSI I saw an option for "easy overclock" so I turned it on. after 3 weeks or so I found out that it had put my cpu to 1.440V voltage. And I freaked out. so I decided I should try and overclock it myself. As I have a stock cooler I never expected amazing thermals but not this bad. At 3.8Ghz and 1.35V it works but the thermals are horrible and I just don't know why. While idle the pc is about 35 - 40 degrees celsius (which is not exactly bad but could be better. But under a stress test, like the prime95 one I did - after about 20 min of testing it gets to like 96 degrees(celsius).
I have some ideas about what I think is happening but I still want your guys' opinions.
When I first mounted the cooler on the CPU, I mounted it incorrectly like 3 times, so I had to take it off and put it back on again 3 times.(without re-newing the thermal paste)
Do you think that's why?
It's okay the way it is now because I've been gaming on the 1.440V cpu for 3 months and it never got so used that the pc had to shut down or anything because of the thermals. And when I did a stress test with "easy overclock" on, the thermals would reach 100 degrees in like 5 min.
Should I be worried?
Reply to Kai7720
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about ryzen thermals overclocking problem
  1. 1.440V is already very high for this CPU. With a 100 degrees you are experiencing thermal throttling and less performance.
    The stock Cooler is not made for that OC! You should turn down the Voltage to around 1.37 and try witch stabile OC you get.
    Then monitore the Temps and try to keep them under 80 degrees. Or buy a bigger Cooler. ;-)
    (renewing the thermal paste also wouldn't be a mistake. ;-))
    MFG RSxx
    Reply to RSxx
  2. RSxx said:
    1.440V is already very high for this CPU. With a 100 degrees you are experiencing thermal throttling and less performance.
    The stock Cooler is not made for that OC! You should turn down the Voltage to around 1.37 and try witch stabile OC you get.
    Then monitore the Temps and try to keep them under 80 degrees. Or buy a bigger Cooler. ;-)
    (renewing the thermal paste also wouldn't be a mistake. ;-))
    MFG RSxx

    I don't think you understood my problem.
    I have it overclocked now to 3.8 Ghz at 1.35 V and it's stable. but the thermals get to about 96 degrees after 20 min of stress testing.
    Reply to Kai7720
  3. repaste the cooler and if you want to oveclock get a after market cpu cooler .
    Reply to scout_03
  4. scout_03 said:
    repaste the cooler and if you want to oveclock get a after market cpu cooler .

    But i've seen people reach 4 Ghz with the stock wraith cooler with decent thermals. My question was simply, why are my thermals on the stock cooler so different to other people's.
    Reply to Kai7720
  5. As scout_03 said, repaste and try again. Also not all CPU's are the same and the thermals in the Case also plays a role.
    Reply to RSxx
  6. From what I've read, your processor should have a 20°C offset to temperature readings.

    Your processor should also throttle at an actual 75°C, because going over can shorten the chip's lifespan.

    If you're seeing 96°C, your chip is most likely at an actual 76°, which is already too hot, and is probably having issues keeping the temperature down with the amount of throttling it's performing.

    Why are others getting better thermals than you with the same cooler?

    Are you running an identical setup to the other people? If you want to repeat their results, you need to replicate their conditions. Expecting the same results from similar but different equipment is not scientific.

    To expound on this:

    Do you have the same chip? No, and early in production you can see a lot of variation in quality.

    Do you have the same motherboard? Maybe.

    Are you using the same BIOS with identical settings? No.

    Do you have the same ambient temperatures? No.

    Do you have the same add-in components, adding the same amount of heat to your system? Probably not.

    Are you running the same case with identical ventilation configuration? Maybe, but probably not.

    Are you running with an open or closed case? Were the other folks you're comparing against?

    The long and the short of it, it's like scout_03 said. Re paste the cooler. Also, if it took you three tries to mount the cooler, are you positive you have it correctly mounted at this point? Lastly, if you want to bring your temperatures down, buy a more effective cooler. Nothing wrong with the stock cooler, it simply wasn't designed to handle the work load you're subjecting it to. You're welcome to keep bumping your CPU into it's TJmax temps and throttling, but you may not get a full lifespan or the best utility out of the CPU. Keeping it cooler will give you more stable performance.
    Reply to bigpinkdragon286
  7. bigpinkdragon286 said:
    From what I've read, your processor should have a 20°C offset to temperature readings.

    Your processor should also throttle at an actual 75°C, because going over can shorten the chip's lifespan.

    If you're seeing 96°C, your chip is most likely at an actual 76°, which is already too hot, and is probably having issues keeping the temperature down with the amount of throttling it's performing.

    Why are others getting better thermals than you with the same cooler?

    Are you running an identical setup to the other people? If you want to repeat their results, you need to replicate their conditions. Expecting the same results from similar but different equipment is not scientific.

    To expound on this:

    Do you have the same chip? No, and early in production you can see a lot of variation in quality.

    Do you have the same motherboard? Maybe.

    Are you using the same BIOS with identical settings? No.

    Do you have the same ambient temperatures? No.

    Do you have the same add-in components, adding the same amount of heat to your system? Probably not.

    Are you running the same case with identical ventilation configuration? Maybe, but probably not.

    Are you running with an open or closed case? Were the other folks you're comparing against?

    The long and the short of it, it's like scout_03 said. Re paste the cooler. Also, if it took you three tries to mount the cooler, are you positive you have it correctly mounted at this point? Lastly, if you want to bring your temperatures down, buy a more effective cooler. Nothing wrong with the stock cooler, it simply wasn't designed to handle the work load you're subjecting it to. You're welcome to keep bumping your CPU into it's TJmax temps and throttling, but you may not get a full lifespan or the best utility out of the CPU. Keeping it cooler will give you more stable performance.

    I thought the 20 degree offset is only on 1700x and 1800x chips. That would mean that my CPU while Idle is at 15 - 20 degrees? that's quite unrealistic.
    Thank you all for your help. This was my first time actually building a PC so that's why I did some stupid mistakes. I'll try to re apply the thermal paste, and see if that makes a difference.
    Reply to Kai7720
  8. Best answer
    No, your CPU isn't at 15 - 20°C when idle, as you can't cool your CPU lower than ambient without some sort of phase change cooling, and normally won't even get exceptionally close to ambient.

    Thermal measurements for CPUs get more accurate as they get closer to TJMax as this is the important temperature to know. There's little reason to try and get great calibration at both ends of the thermal spectrum (even if they could) as it's highly unlikely anyone will ever cool their CPU to death. Nobody talks about it much, but it's the same for Intel CPUs. People are just more aware of it when it comes to AMD. Take idle or low end temperatures on CPUs with a grain of salt.

    While the 20°C offset doesn't apply to the Ryzen 7 1700, I have read that it applies to both the Ryzen 5 1600 and 1600x models. While I can't guarantee it's true, it is a pretty safe bet, as your CPU isn't supposed to be going over 75°C, and you're seeing 96°C, which would coincide with where the processor is going to throttle at if it has the offset, so...
    Reply to bigpinkdragon286
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