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Possible PSU issue EVGA g3 1000w

Hello and thanks for any replies.
My possible issue is as follows: When I turn on my PC from a cold start, as in the power cord was just inserted into the PSU and the little switch flipped to the on position - The PC comes on, then turns off for two seconds, then comes to life. It only happens if I unplug the PC after a shut down. It doesn't happen if I restart, or shut down then start up. Only happens if I unplug the PSU from the wall.

I have no idea what would cause this as my previous EVGA NEX 750G did not do this at all. The only things I can think of are that my components aren't enough of a load for the PSU or my apartment's power isn't good enough for the 1000W at that particular outlet/line. I don't know anything about electricity though :(

Current components hooked up
i7 7700k@ 5.0ghz @ 1.35volts (hyper 212)
16gb corsair vengeance 3000mhz
gtx 1080 ti (founders)
4 case fans (3x140, 1x120)
2 2tb hdd
1 500gb ssd

I plan on using the evga hybrid kit on the 1080ti and maybe getting a kraken x62 for the cpu.
Reply to yoitsmegabe
12 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about psu issue evga 1000w
  1. It's probably just that the 5VSB rail hasn't charged the output caps yet. When you hit the rapidly insert the cord and hit the power button, the motherboard will try to pull that rail low, and if the caps aren't charged enough, it will pull the voltage too low for the POWER_GOOD signal to tell the motherboard that the PSU is on.

    In layman terms: you aren't letting the PSU get situated before hitting the power button. This is not good. Do not do that.

    That's an insanely obscure bug, though. Why are you trying to turn the computer on so quickly after plugging it in?
    Reply to the nerd 389
  2. I agree, nothing is wrong. You are not using the PSU like it is intended resulting in the bump in power. like "the nerd" said, most likely the caps haven't discharged yet before you plug it back in.
    Reply to iamacow
  3. iamacow said:
    I agree, nothing is wrong. You are not using the PSU like it is intended resulting in the bump in power. like "the nerd" said, most likely the caps haven't discharged yet before you plug it back in.


    Minor point: the 5VSB caps discharge more quickly than they charge. The issue is more likely that they haven't charged yet, rather than they haven't discharged yet.
    Reply to the nerd 389
  4. my fault :)
    Reply to iamacow
  5. the nerd 389 said:
    It's probably just that the 5VSB rail hasn't charged the output caps yet. When you hit the rapidly insert the cord and hit the power button, the motherboard will try to pull that rail low, and if the caps aren't charged enough, it will pull the voltage too low for the POWER_GOOD signal to tell the motherboard that the PSU is on.

    In layman terms: you aren't letting the PSU get situated before hitting the power button. This is not good. Do not do that.

    That's an insanely obscure bug, though. Why are you trying to turn the computer on so quickly after plugging it in?


    I didn't think I was trying to turn it on quickly, I've never encountered this on any other power supply before. I didn't know there was a "warm up" period before turning on a PC after plugging it in. How long should I wait to see if its just how soon I was pressing the button? Thanks for the explanation as well.
    Reply to yoitsmegabe
  6. I would think that 10 seconds would be reasonable.
    Reply to the nerd 389
  7. the nerd 389 said:
    I would think that 10 seconds would be reasonable.


    I definitely wait more than ten seconds. I'm going to give it a minute and see what happens
    Reply to yoitsmegabe
  8. the nerd 389 said:
    I would think that 10 seconds would be reasonable.


    Nah, I just waited two full minutes before powering on after flipping the switch on the PSU, it still happened. i'm still stumped. Thanks for all the possible solutions though.
    Reply to yoitsmegabe
  9. I'll look into the details of that PSU and see if I can find something definitive for you.
    Reply to the nerd 389
  10. So, I called evga they said to return the power supply. At the same time an evga rep replied on the evga forum and said that sometimes that happens and it's nothing to worry about. I think I'll exchange the unit. Thanks for the replies.

    PS: Do I even need 1000w for my setup? I plan on adding an aio to both my coy and gpu.
    Reply to yoitsmegabe
  11. Best answer
    You do not need 1000 watts. 850 is sufficient for an SLI x 2 setup. You need about 500, and a 750 watt PSU would be ideal.
    Reply to the nerd 389
  12. the nerd 389 said:
    You do not need 1000 watts. 850 is sufficient for an SLI x 2 setup. You need about 500, and a 750 watt PSU would be ideal.


    Awesome I guess I'll keep my current PSU then. Thanks
    Reply to yoitsmegabe
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