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Problems Installing New Video Card in HP Desktop

I own an HP Pavilion Elite h8-1260t, which I purchased in March of 2012. It's running Windows 7 (I tried 10 and went back to 7.) I just bought a EVGA GeForce GTX 1050 Ti SC. After reading many reviews and random forum threads with people successfully installing this GPU into older, seemingly less sophisticated machines, I figured I would have no issues with my computer.

When I install the card, the computer powers on, enters the initial HP splash screen, then there is one long audible beep. Shortly thereafter there is another long beep immediately followed by three short beeps in rapid succession. At this point everything locks up, I can't access System Settings or do anything else—I just have to press the power button to shut off the machine and start over.

I have read virtually every single forum thread I could find on this subject and am still unable to solve my issue. I followed instructions on installing a new graphics card exactly. I uninstalled all of the existing AMD Radeon drivers, and even disabled the on-board graphics. I tried this both manually, and again after using "Display Driver Uninstaller" which was made for this very purpose. Still nothing.

Most of the threads I come across on this matter are focused on accessing BIOS and disabling secure boot, and enabling legacy boot. However, when I get into my system setting upon startup, these options are not available on my system. There is no "BIOS Settings" option. There is no "Secure Boot Configuration", nothing about legacy boot... nothing. The only mention of the word "BIOS" is a list of days to enable/disable.

Other Things I've tried:

- Updated BIOS with most recent available update on product support page
- CMOS flush-- powered down computer, removed little battery
- Booted into safe mode, ran Display Driver Uninstaller, shut down, installed new card... same problem

I see essentially 3 potential solutions to my problem:

1) [ANSWER] This graphics card is not compatible with my PC/motherboard, period. Time for a new computer. If someone can answer this definitively I will be as happy as if I can get it to work. I just hate this "what if??" period.

2) I need to upgrade my power supply. Over the years I've upgraded to an SSD, 16 GB Ram, added an additional PCI USB 3.0 card, and have 2 internal Sata HDD. As I mentioned, the system seems to power on just fine with the new video card. Is it possible to get past this point, but for the issue to still come down to the power supply? How would I know this?

3) There is some other way to access "Advanced BIOS" or something so I can make changes to secure boot/legacy boot settings.

Please help me out! Thanks.
Reply to dsbrophy
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More about problems installing video card desktop
  1. Sounds like you have an award bios which the beep means video issue. Cant say for sure if the video card is the issue or your power supply. You system has 3 PSU's and the 300W option may not be enough. This seasonic is very good and should fix the issue if its the PSU. I suggest first tho testing the card in another know working system with a better PSU than yours.
    http://www.computerhope.com/beep.htm
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    Power Supply: SeaSonic 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($34.90 @ Newegg)
    Total: $34.90
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-04-28 12:16 EDT-0400

    Another possiblility is your bios requires shutting down the integrated video in bios. Those issues tho shouldn't be the issue as most of those systems was from the last decade.
    Reply to elbert
  2. elbert said:
    Sounds like you have an award bios which the beep means video issue. Cant say for sure if the video card is the issue or your power supply. You system has 3 PSU's and the 300W option may not be enough. This seasonic is very good and should fix the issue if its the PSU. I suggest first tho testing the card in another know working system with a better PSU than yours.
    http://www.computerhope.com/beep.htm
    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    Power Supply: SeaSonic 520W 80+ Bronze Certified Fully-Modular ATX Power Supply ($34.90 @ Newegg)
    Total: $34.90
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-04-28 12:16 EDT-0400

    Another possiblility is your bios requires shutting down the integrated video in bios. Those issues tho shouldn't be the issue as most of those systems was from the last decade.


    Hello and thank you,

    So you are saying that it is completely possible for the computer to successfully power on and begin to load, and still not be able to proceed solely because of an insufficient power supply? Or would it just not turn on/boot up at all?

    I did explore the meaning of the beep codes, and arrived at a similar conclusion. That is a good link to bookmark for sure. Unfortunately I don't have any other working systems to test it out on. I very well may buy a new power supply here just so I can rule that out.

    Thanks again for your response.
    Reply to dsbrophy
  3. With a PSU issue its all possible even booting windows but the games fail to play. The video card is showing the splash screen if I understood your post.

    The only other things I would suggest is unpluggin your PC from the wall. Pull the motherboard battery for 5 minutes and then put it back in which you did. This will reset the bios. Try reseating the video card by pulling out of the slot and putting it back in. This step helps ensure proper contact with the PCIE slot connectors. While the card is out try using your old video port to enter bios and disbled Secure Boot.
    Reply to elbert
  4. Best answer
    Companies like HP & Dell are known to put restrictions in their BIOS' so only specific hardware will work, this includes GPU's. They do this To reduce warranty claims from things like frying a PSU by using a GPU that draws too many watts. My guess from your description is your motherboard has such a BIOS and your gpu is not compatible.
    Reply to sizzling
  5. One thing you might be able to see in your bios, even if you can't change anything, is this: Boot into the bios with the onboard graphics connected to the monitor AND the new videocard installed but not connected to the monitor. The idea is is you want to look in the section of the bios where the onboard video and pci-ex slot stuff is shown. It should show you that you are currently enabling and using integrated graphics but it should also show you that it has detected the videocard. If it has not detected the videocard then it means the computer can't see this card at all. Since it's a new card I'd say it's because this HP won't work with the new card. I don't believe this is a power supply issue.
    Reply to dontlistentome
  6. elbert said:
    With a PSU issue its all possible even booting windows but the games fail to play. The video card is showing the splash screen if I understood your post.

    The only other things I would suggest is unpluggin your PC from the wall. Pull the motherboard battery for 5 minutes and then put it back in which you did. This will reset the bios. Try reseating the video card by pulling out of the slot and putting it back in. This step helps ensure proper contact with the PCIE slot connectors. While the card is out try using your old video port to enter bios and disbled Secure Boot.


    I've tried that a number of times, to no avail. I literally cannot access any of the BIOS settings. Someone on the HP Support forums informed me that I have Legacy BIOS rather than UEFI on my machine, which is why my computer set up options are so limited. Mind-numbingly frustrating that HP chose to do this.

    sizzling said:
    Companies like HP & Dell are known to put restrictions in their BIOS' so only specific hardware will work, this includes GPU's. They do this To reduce warranty claims from things like frying a PSU by using a GPU that draws too many watts. My guess from your description is your motherboard has such a BIOS and your gpu is not compatible.


    You are right, I'm afraid. Although a rep from NVIDIA was quite insistent that it should be able to work with my computer somehow. I am not trying to contact AMI motherboard company directly now.

    Anonymous said:
    One thing you might be able to see in your bios, even if you can't change anything, is this: Boot into the bios with the onboard graphics connected to the monitor AND the new videocard installed but not connected to the monitor. The idea is is you want to look in the section of the bios where the onboard video and pci-ex slot stuff is shown. It should show you that you are currently enabling and using integrated graphics but it should also show you that it has detected the videocard. If it has not detected the videocard then it means the computer can't see this card at all. Since it's a new card I'd say it's because this HP won't work with the new card. I don't believe this is a power supply issue.


    I did try booting with everything hooked up as you say, and still the same issue. Can't even get into BIOS to see PCIe connections. Damn you, HP!
    Reply to dsbrophy
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