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Aorus X370 Gaming 5 or Gaming K5?

Would you recommend one of these two boards?
Are they good? I do not have any experience with Gigabyte-boards.
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  1. Best answer
    Cookies4sure said:
    Would you recommend one of these two boards?
    Are they good? I do not have any experience with Gigabyte-boards.


    The Gigabyte Gaming 5 is better than the Gigabyte Gaming K5. Both are relatively good motherboards and packs a lot of features such as Dual BIOS support, PCIe Steel Armor (all slots), RAM Steel Armor (all slots), 90-degree SATA port orientation (all SATA ports), RGB lighting, among others.

    A lot of the Gaming 5 and Gaming K5 slots/ports/connectivity are the same:

    Both 5 and K5 have 4x RAM Slots supporting up to 64GB and up to 3200MHz speeds
    Both 5 and K5 have 3x PCIe x16 Slots (2x PCIe3.0 x16 [x16]/[x8/x8] + 1x PCIe2.0 x16 [x4])
    Both 5 and K5 have 3x PCIe2.0 x1 Slots
    Both 5 and K5 support Multi-GPU using 2-way Nvidia SLI or 2-way/3-way AMD CrossFire
    Both 5 and K5 have 2x SATAe connectors
    Both 5 and K5 have a total of 8x SATA 6Gb/s ports (all controlled via X370 chipset)
    Both 5 and K5 have 1x M.2 socket (in either PCIe3.0 x4 mode or SATA 6Gb/s mode)
    Both 5 and K5 have the 5x Audio Jacks and 1x S/PDIF out port
    Both 5 and K5 have a total of 10x USB rear panel ports, i.e., 1x USB3.1 Type-C (via ASMedia) + 3x USB3.1 Type-A (2 via X370 chipset and 1 via ASMedia) + 6x USB3.0 Type-A (4 via CPU and 2 via X370 chipset)
    Both 5 and K5 have 2x USB3.0 internal headers and 2x USB2.0 internal headers
    Both 5 and K5 have the basic headers (TPM, AAFP, Front Panel, CMOS jumper, etc.)
    Both 5 and K5 have an OC button on-board
    Both 5 and K5 have Debug LEDs (CPU, DRAM, VGA, and BOOT status)
    Both 5 and K5 require a 24-pin ATX and an 8-pin ATX12V power cable
    Both 5 and K5 have a 4-pin (+12V/G/R/B) and 5-pin (+12V/G/R/B/W) LED header on-board
    Both 5 and K5 are the exact same size (ATX at 305mm x 244mm)

    Now, the main differences between the Gaming 5 and the Gaming K5 are:

    5 has dual-LAN (Intel I211AT and Killer E2500) Controllers | K5 only has one (Intel I211AT)
    5 has dual-Audio Codec (2x Realtek ALC1220) | K5 only has one (Realtek ALC1220)
    5 has a total of 8x 4-pin Fan Headers | K5 only has 5x 4-pin Fan Headers
    5 has a Clear CMOS Button | K5 has none
    5 has 2x BIOS On-board Switches | K5 has none
    5 has a Power/On Button and a Reset Button | K5 has none
    5 has a 2-pin Temperature Sensor Header | K5 has none
    5 is Black+White themed | K5 is Black+Gray themed
    5 has its PCIe2.0 x16 [x4-mode] (the third PCIe x16 slot) running on [x2] only if the PCIEX1_2 or PCIEX1_3 slots are occupied, and running on [x1] only if the PCIEX1_1 is occupied | K5 has its PCIe2.0 x16 [x4-mode] (the third PCIe x16 slot) running on [x2] only if the PCIEX1_2 or PCIEX1_3 slots are occupied (no limitations set when using the PCIEX1_1 slot)

    So, with the above differences in features (and price), it's up to you if you do need the features found on the Gaming 5 to justify buying it instead of the Gaming K5. You won't go wrong with both motherboards as both are of good quality compared to other motherboard models which doesn't pack a lot of features and built-quality as these 2 boards show.

    Hope the information above helps.
  2. thx for the quick answer, I guess I will get the K5 then.
  3. Cookies4sure said:
    thx for the quick answer, I guess I will get the K5 then.


    I have Gaming 5 and do not recommend it at all.

    My CPU is Ryzen 7 1700 with stock (LED )cooler and RAM is 2 x Crucial Ballistix Sport DDR4 2400 ( it is on QVL list) and GPU is RX 460 4GB. It is connected to 850 watt Thermaltake PSU and housed in a Zalman Z12 Plus case. My HDD's are connected through a 4-bay IcyDock 2.5" hot-swap HDD cage which I installed on a 5.25 drive bay on my case. Basically, I should not have any reason to open the side panel of the case ever again.

    Theroretically the Ryzen 7 1700 is supported with BIOS F3 ( original BIOS the motherboard came with), now I am running on latest BIOS F5 ( Agesa 1.0.0.4.a )

    The problem is this damn thing freezes and gets stuck on an undocumented BIOS POST code. Does it freeze on Windows ? No. This damn thing freezes when you enter BIOS. I enter BIOS, click on a few arrow keys to move around it and baaamm... it freezes. When it freezes, it stays so, restarting does not help, shutting down and restartign does not help etc. I shut it down, wait for 5 minutes, then it starts to run.

    It has lots of fancy features for sure. The On/Off button, CMOS clear button, OC button, restart button located at the top right and 7 point POST LED display in bottom left are very helpful if you build assemble your motherboard by placing the CPU and RAM AND IF YOU POWER IT UP BEFORE YOU INSTALL IT ON YOUR CASE. After you install it on your case and close the side panels, they are useless.

    I had read Ryzen had issues and deduced that I needed a CMOS Clear button. But a Clear CMOS button is useless unless you can use it without opening your case, and some Asus motherboards do have them located on the back panel of motherboard - but god, they are expensive. I had two alternatives MSI Carbon Pro or this one. I selected this one for the presence of Clear CMOS key only. And it turned out to be useless.

    Another thing I constantly experience is the motherboard freezes and displays a POST message "b4 : USB device hot plug-in" . Did you understand what the problem is? I did not either.

    Not only are the BIOS POST code definitions are cryptic and useless, they are not readable at all. Some error codes displayed on motherboards bottom left corner is not even documented even like this. And after two weeks, I still can not figure out what the displayed code is, from my chair I incline a bit down and can see some lights which are obstructed by the GPU ! So I push the case a bit to the right, incline a bit more downwards, and there I see something unrecognizable. Why ? Because instead of a LCD display, there is a regular POST LED installed. So I see something, I try to deduce what it looks like ( the POST documentation in manual lists them as "B4" but what I can see is something like this: https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS0mFagkfVvLpNrdHxni3gitoJb-OyVv9MniXP-mtZmVyUz3lbm I am not even sure about the orientation of the code; I just know that I am looking at it from top. Does it display b4 or something like Ah ?

    In times like this, I want to get a big axe and storm into Gigabyte R&D department and hack those idiots. And believe me, this happens everyday and I get the urge every day.

    The main m.2 socket - where you will put your precious, highly expensive NVMe drive is located exactly under your GPU slot, you can not see the slot at all let alone change it without removing the GPU. You might not see this in pictures, or heck even if you have the board in your hands you might not visualize this. It is not easy to imagine how it will look like with the GPU installed. Well, almost all GPU's starting with RX 460 and GTX 1050 are dual socket GPUs - meaning they not only cover their own slot, but also the slot below them too. Which happens to be the exact place where main m.2 PCIe 3.0 x4 NVMe drive is supposed to go in.

    NVMe drives tend to get very hot, and those idiots decided to put them just beneath another very hot component. So, I did not risk my NVMe drive at all; I will need to order some third party passive m.2 cooler before doing that. In times like this, I again want to get an axe and...

    This applies to all motherboards - Intel and AMD alike : There are lots of ports, but as it happens, a port being there and having a working, compatible device to go in that port, and putting the device into that port and making all connections.. does not mean it will work. Somehow, things like PCIe lanes come into play.

    For example, if you put a PCIex4 device in a specific x16 port, all three PCIe x1 ports become unavailable. If you connect a SATA m.2 drive into main m.2 slot, SATA 3 port ( there are 8 ports, 0 to 7 ) becomes unavailable. If you manage to get a U.2 NVMe drive and connect it to its U.2 port, the main m.2 port becomes unavailable and so on. Lots of limitations are there.

    Now, I love this motherboards features :

    - You might not care about LED lighting ( I certainly hated the idea ), but if you have a case with a glass sidepanel or with a mesh top, you will start caring. LED lighting is much more likeable than I imagined. But, beware - you can set different areas of motherboard in different colors - but you can not set CPU cooler LED color. Somehow, it is set automatically based on god knows what. For example, as shipped motherbaord had LED colors set to red, and CPU cooler LED color was dark green - why, god knows. Since my case was shipped with two case fans with blue LED's, I set all motherboard LED's to blue as well; now the CPU cooler LED color is a very faint orange. Why, god knows.

    - There are 8 SATA ports, and they are very important to me. If I ever get my hands on a U.2 drive, I can try it as well.

    - It is beautiful to look at.

    Shit... I recongized that the only reason I have to keep this board is that I can not give it back.

    I wish I had purchased MSI X370 Carbon Pro. Sure, it would have its problems and I would need to short some pins to clear CMOS ( Gaming 5 has one of them too ) but at least its main m.2 location was not exactly beneath the GPU slot.

    To sum up: unless you need this as a test bed like I do, stay away from it. .
  4. eyupo92 said:
    Cookies4sure said:
    thx for the quick answer, I guess I will get the K5 then.


    I have Gaming 5 and do not recommend it at all.

    My CPU is Ryzen 7 1700 with stock (LED )cooler and RAM is 2 x Crucial Ballistix Sport DDR4 2400 ( it is on QVL list) and GPU is RX 460 4GB. It is connected to 850 watt Thermaltake PSU and housed in a Zalman Z12 Plus case. My HDD's are connected through a 4-bay IcyDock 2.5" hot-swap HDD cage which I installed on a 5.25 drive bay on my case. Basically, I should not have any reason to open the side panel of the case ever again.

    Theroretically the Ryzen 7 1700 is supported with BIOS F3 ( original BIOS the motherboard came with), now I am running on latest BIOS F5 ( Agesa 1.0.0.4.a )

    The problem is this damn thing freezes and gets stuck on an undocumented BIOS POST code. Does it freeze on Windows ? No. This damn thing freezes when you enter BIOS. I enter BIOS, click on a few arrow keys to move around it and baaamm... it freezes. When it freezes, it stays so, restarting does not help, shutting down and restartign does not help etc. I shut it down, wait for 5 minutes, then it starts to run.
    ... .


    Particularly: "To sum up: unless you need this as a test bed like I do, stay away from it. ."

    No, stay away from the F5 BIOS and I bet most of your complaints would be solved, especially the BIOS freezing problem that seems to be irritating you the most.

    I have the Gigabyte AX370 Gaming 5 and I would HIGHLY recommend it. The Killer NIC is great, the feature I have enjoyed the most and the lights are fun and look great. Games look great too, and are real smooth. But, um, that's what BIOS updates are for, to fix BIOS problems. You act like you have no other options when you do. I have found the F5 BIOS isn't very good, so you know what, I backed down to F4 BIOS, which you act like you can't do, and all is fine. There is nothing that says you MUST use the latest BIOS. Most AM4 motherboards have BIOS issues at some point since it is so new. So contrary to what you imply, these Gigabyte motherboards are not unique. Although I do think MSI is on the ball better than most concerning Ryzen, but there will be new BIOSes for the Gaming 5 and that can fix problems. You can get a new BIOS, but you can't add features to your motherboard, EVER. MSI just basically has two models, the Carbon and the Titanium, one a midrange board and the other an extreme high end with nothing in between, which the Carbon is too mediocre in features and the Titanium is too expensive. You get the Carbon, and you are stuck with either a mediocre motherboard or an expendable motherboard because you will need to get something else if you want more features than what the Carbon has.

    I highly recommend the Gigabyte X370 Gaming 5 even though I tried the F5 BIOS and then tried to get my Trident Z memory from New Egg to run at it's rated speed of 3200 Mhz and 15 CAS, like it was doing with the F4 BIOS, by XMP Profile 1, and when it rebooted, nothing. Ryzen is NOT for beginners, and the way it sounds, not for you, because you can't handle a few challenges and you gotta be ready to have your troubleshooting skills tested and be ready to get into the case and move things around and DON'T GIVE UP! But it sounds like you want everything to be near perfect.

    But I got mine working again after updating to F5, even though I did think the motherboard was toast or the memory got toasted. For some reason, the BIOS reset didn't fix the memory issue, reset it to a memory speed it could handle with F5. I had to take the memory out of slots 1 and 3 and put one in slot 2 and it booted after trying all sorts of ways to reset the BIOS enough for it to work. But it did boot fine when I moved the memory out of 1 and 3 slots and one stick into slot 2, booted into Windows, reflashed back to F4 and now all is good in the world, with the memory back in slots 1 and 3, back to where I started with the lesson learned of DON'T USE THE F5 BIOS! Wait until they come out with F6 and see if that is better than F4.
  5. @Redraid3r : I was about to post an answer to your post, but then remembered how flame wars on forums start and get out of control.

    I am happy that you got lucky somehow and somehow you also keep recommending a board by a company that wrecks something working while trying to improve it after you have experienced this first hand.

    May better days be coming for you and your system.

    Best Regards
  6. eyupo92 said:
    @Redraid3r : I was about to post an answer to your post, but then remembered how flame wars on forums start and get out of control.

    I am happy that you got lucky somehow and somehow you also keep recommending a board by a company that wrecks something working while trying to improve it after you have experienced this first hand.

    May better days be coming for you and your system.

    Best Regards



    Don't put all the blame on Gigabyte because all they did was provide a BIOS with updates from AMD to try to improve memory compatibility, the AGESA update, and other things, such as the CPU microcode update to make the CPU more efficient. And I don't hold AMD completely at fault because this is just part of dealing with the cutting edge of technology, a brand new CPU architecture.

    Your saying breaking something that is working applies to all manufacturers. Just be glad you didn't start with ASUS, where they weren't doing any BIOS updates for any of their Ryzen boards except for the ROG Hero one and people, based on reviews, have or had many more problems than this. This is just what comes with the territory of being a technology early adopter. Just have patience and it will get better. I guess I should give my system specs.

    AMD Ryzen 1600X
    Gigabyte GA-AX370 Gaming 5
    G.SKILL TridentZ Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) Model F4-3200C15D-16GTZSW (running at 3200 mhz CL 15)
    PowerColor AXRX Radeon Red Dragon RX 580 8GB
    Samsung 960 EVO Series 500GB NVMe M.2 Internal SSD
    2 x Seagate Barracuda 2TB SATA III 7,200 RPM Internal HDD - OEM
    Corsair AX760 AX Series 760 Watt 80 Plus Platinum ATX Power Supply Refurbished
    Thermaltake Suppressor 31 Tempered Glass window case

    Best regards to you too.
  7. As for my part, I bought the Gaming 5 and I have experienced no problems what so ever. I put together my system, consisting of a Ryzen 5 1600 and 16 gb of Corsair Vengeance LPX 3000 and everything worked just fine, right from the beginning. Even my memory runs at 2933 Mhz by just selecting the XMP-Profile in the UEFI without any further tuning. I am still using the F4 BIOS, since I do not have any problems and therefore I have no reason to update it.

    So I, for my part, would buy this board definitely again, because it has great features for a fairly reasonable price in my opinion. There might be some issues, but since I have not experienced any so far, I cannot complain at all.
    Additional, as mentioned above, I think such problems are part of the risk you take, for buying something absolutely new and basically not really tested. Everything comes at a price and as I see it, this is the price you might have to pay, if you jump on a completely new plattform.
  8. Cookies4sure said:
    As for my part, I bought the Gaming 5 and I have experienced no problems what so ever. I put together my system, consisting of a Ryzen 5 1600 and 16 gb of Corsair Vengeance LPX 3000 and everything worked just fine, right from the beginning. Even my memory runs at 2933 Mhz by just selecting the XMP-Profile in the UEFI without any further tuning. I am still using the F4 BIOS, since I do not have any problems and therefore I have no reason to update it.

    So I, for my part, would buy this board definitely again, because it has great features for a fairly reasonable price in my opinion. There might be some issues, but since I have not experienced any so far, I cannot complain at all.
    Additional, as mentioned above, I think such problems are part of the risk you take, for buying something absolutely new and basically not really tested. Everything comes at a price and as I see it, this is the price you might have to pay, if you jump on a completely new plattform.


    "I think such problems are part of the risk you take, for buying something absolutely new and basically not really tested. Everything comes at a price and as I see it, this is the price you might have to pay, if you jump on a completely new plattform."

    Exactly. And actually overcoming those challenges makes working with PCs fun again. It was really getting stale. If you want a SAFE bet, get an AMD FX CPU and motherboard, which the prices have really dropped since Ryzen, or especially safe and boring, Intel. Or even get a Mac if you want safe and cutesy.

    And yeah, stay away from the F5 BIOS. But I did try the F5 BIOS and, really, I thought my motherboard was toast. But if that hadn't happened, I wouldn't have gotten the thrill of getting it going again. I didn't do anything wrong, so I wasn't negligent, so the worst that could happen is I had to take it back to the store, which I got the 2 year replacement on everything at Micro Center. But I got it working and am really loving it.

    I tried F5 because I read that AMD also had some microcode updates as well as memory compatibility improvements with the AGESA update.
  9. Then you might find this thread and the second reply to it interesting : http://forum.gigabyte.us/thread/886/am4-beta-bios-thread
  10. eyupo92 said:
    Then you might find this thread and the second reply to it interesting : http://forum.gigabyte.us/thread/886/am4-beta-bios-thread


    Yeah, that's good news right? Thanks for that info. I'm going to try F6D.
  11. eyupo92 said:
    Cookies4sure said:
    thx for the quick answer, I guess I will get the K5 then.


    I have Gaming 5 and do not recommend it at all.

    My CPU is Ryzen 7 1700 with stock (LED )cooler and RAM is 2 x Crucial Ballistix Sport DDR4 2400 ( it is on QVL list) and GPU is RX 460 4GB. It is connected to 850 watt Thermaltake PSU and housed in a Zalman Z12 Plus case. My HDD's are connected through a 4-bay IcyDock 2.5" hot-swap HDD cage which I installed on a 5.25 drive bay on my case. Basically, I should not have any reason to open the side panel of the case ever again.

    Theroretically the Ryzen 7 1700 is supported with BIOS F3 ( original BIOS the motherboard came with), now I am running on latest BIOS F5 ( Agesa 1.0.0.4.a )

    The problem is this damn thing freezes and gets stuck on an undocumented BIOS POST code. Does it freeze on Windows ? No. This damn thing freezes when you enter BIOS. I enter BIOS, click on a few arrow keys to move around it and baaamm... it freezes. When it freezes, it stays so, restarting does not help, shutting down and restartign does not help etc. I shut it down, wait for 5 minutes, then it starts to run.

    It has lots of fancy features for sure. The On/Off button, CMOS clear button, OC button, restart button located at the top right and 7 point POST LED display in bottom left are very helpful if you build assemble your motherboard by placing the CPU and RAM AND IF YOU POWER IT UP BEFORE YOU INSTALL IT ON YOUR CASE. After you install it on your case and close the side panels, they are useless.

    I had read Ryzen had issues and deduced that I needed a CMOS Clear button. But a Clear CMOS button is useless unless you can use it without opening your case, and some Asus motherboards do have them located on the back panel of motherboard - but god, they are expensive. I had two alternatives MSI Carbon Pro or this one. I selected this one for the presence of Clear CMOS key only. And it turned out to be useless.

    Another thing I constantly experience is the motherboard freezes and displays a POST message "b4 : USB device hot plug-in" . Did you understand what the problem is? I did not either.

    Not only are the BIOS POST code definitions are cryptic and useless, they are not readable at all. Some error codes displayed on motherboards bottom left corner is not even documented even like this. And after two weeks, I still can not figure out what the displayed code is, from my chair I incline a bit down and can see some lights which are obstructed by the GPU ! So I push the case a bit to the right, incline a bit more downwards, and there I see something unrecognizable. Why ? Because instead of a LCD display, there is a regular POST LED installed. So I see something, I try to deduce what it looks like ( the POST documentation in manual lists them as "B4" but what I can see is something like this: https://encrypted-tbn3.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS0mFagkfVvLpNrdHxni3gitoJb-OyVv9MniXP-mtZmVyUz3lbm I am not even sure about the orientation of the code; I just know that I am looking at it from top. Does it display b4 or something like Ah ?

    In times like this, I want to get a big axe and storm into Gigabyte R&D department and hack those idiots. And believe me, this happens everyday and I get the urge every day.

    The main m.2 socket - where you will put your precious, highly expensive NVMe drive is located exactly under your GPU slot, you can not see the slot at all let alone change it without removing the GPU. You might not see this in pictures, or heck even if you have the board in your hands you might not visualize this. It is not easy to imagine how it will look like with the GPU installed. Well, almost all GPU's starting with RX 460 and GTX 1050 are dual socket GPUs - meaning they not only cover their own slot, but also the slot below them too. Which happens to be the exact place where main m.2 PCIe 3.0 x4 NVMe drive is supposed to go in.

    NVMe drives tend to get very hot, and those idiots decided to put them just beneath another very hot component. So, I did not risk my NVMe drive at all; I will need to order some third party passive m.2 cooler before doing that. In times like this, I again want to get an axe and...

    This applies to all motherboards - Intel and AMD alike : There are lots of ports, but as it happens, a port being there and having a working, compatible device to go in that port, and putting the device into that port and making all connections.. does not mean it will work. Somehow, things like PCIe lanes come into play.

    For example, if you put a PCIex4 device in a specific x16 port, all three PCIe x1 ports become unavailable. If you connect a SATA m.2 drive into main m.2 slot, SATA 3 port ( there are 8 ports, 0 to 7 ) becomes unavailable. If you manage to get a U.2 NVMe drive and connect it to its U.2 port, the main m.2 port becomes unavailable and so on. Lots of limitations are there.

    Now, I love this motherboards features :

    - You might not care about LED lighting ( I certainly hated the idea ), but if you have a case with a glass sidepanel or with a mesh top, you will start caring. LED lighting is much more likeable than I imagined. But, beware - you can set different areas of motherboard in different colors - but you can not set CPU cooler LED color. Somehow, it is set automatically based on god knows what. For example, as shipped motherbaord had LED colors set to red, and CPU cooler LED color was dark green - why, god knows. Since my case was shipped with two case fans with blue LED's, I set all motherboard LED's to blue as well; now the CPU cooler LED color is a very faint orange. Why, god knows.

    - There are 8 SATA ports, and they are very important to me. If I ever get my hands on a U.2 drive, I can try it as well.

    - It is beautiful to look at.

    Shit... I recongized that the only reason I have to keep this board is that I can not give it back.

    I wish I had purchased MSI X370 Carbon Pro. Sure, it would have its problems and I would need to short some pins to clear CMOS ( Gaming 5 has one of them too ) but at least its main m.2 location was not exactly beneath the GPU slot.

    To sum up: unless you need this as a test bed like I do, stay away from it. .
  12. Well I bought both. I have two systems as I could not decide which was better.

    To be honest its a mixed bag. The Gaming 5 seems more sedate and detuned running much cooler than my Carbon pro and the CPU horsepower with the Carbon pro is for some reason much better but it gets hot and resets a lot.

    Do not have that problem with the gaming 5 at all.

    The Gaming 5 is not really a full x370 it does not maintain voltages per that spec, which is irritating.

    The M2 placement is also not an issue on the Gaming 5, I run tools to monitor it and the Carbon Pro just runs much hotter. They both have the same M60 water cooler and both have the same Seasonic PSU and they both run the Cooler Master HAF XB III EVO cases, which I love.

    Think I am going to go more higher end with a threadripper CPU and suitable motherboard, these X1700 CPU's are nice but my software compilers can use core and threads now, so a threadripper will save me a lot of time when I crunch code for my chess engine code I am developing.
  13. Redraid3r said:
    eyupo92 said:
    Cookies4sure said:
    thx for the quick answer, I guess I will get the K5 then.


    I have Gaming 5 and do not recommend it at all.

    My CPU is Ryzen 7 1700 with stock (LED )cooler and RAM is 2 x Crucial Ballistix Sport DDR4 2400 ( it is on QVL list) and GPU is RX 460 4GB. It is connected to 850 watt Thermaltake PSU and housed in a Zalman Z12 Plus case. My HDD's are connected through a 4-bay IcyDock 2.5" hot-swap HDD cage which I installed on a 5.25 drive bay on my case. Basically, I should not have any reason to open the side panel of the case ever again.

    Theroretically the Ryzen 7 1700 is supported with BIOS F3 ( original BIOS the motherboard came with), now I am running on latest BIOS F5 ( Agesa 1.0.0.4.a )

    The problem is this damn thing freezes and gets stuck on an undocumented BIOS POST code. Does it freeze on Windows ? No. This damn thing freezes when you enter BIOS. I enter BIOS, click on a few arrow keys to move around it and baaamm... it freezes. When it freezes, it stays so, restarting does not help, shutting down and restartign does not help etc. I shut it down, wait for 5 minutes, then it starts to run.
    ... .


    Particularly: "To sum up: unless you need this as a test bed like I do, stay away from it. ."

    No, stay away from the F5 BIOS and I bet most of your complaints would be solved, especially the BIOS freezing problem that seems to be irritating you the most.

    I have the Gigabyte AX370 Gaming 5 and I would HIGHLY recommend it. The Killer NIC is great, the feature I have enjoyed the most and the lights are fun and look great. Games look great too, and are real smooth. But, um, that's what BIOS updates are for, to fix BIOS problems. You act like you have no other options when you do. I have found the F5 BIOS isn't very good, so you know what, I backed down to F4 BIOS, which you act like you can't do, and all is fine. There is nothing that says you MUST use the latest BIOS. Most AM4 motherboards have BIOS issues at some point since it is so new. So contrary to what you imply, these Gigabyte motherboards are not unique. Although I do think MSI is on the ball better than most concerning Ryzen, but there will be new BIOSes for the Gaming 5 and that can fix problems. You can get a new BIOS, but you can't add features to your motherboard, EVER. MSI just basically has two models, the Carbon and the Titanium, one a midrange board and the other an extreme high end with nothing in between, which the Carbon is too mediocre in features and the Titanium is too expensive. You get the Carbon, and you are stuck with either a mediocre motherboard or an expendable motherboard because you will need to get something else if you want more features than what the Carbon has.

    I highly recommend the Gigabyte X370 Gaming 5 even though I tried the F5 BIOS and then tried to get my Trident Z memory from New Egg to run at it's rated speed of 3200 Mhz and 15 CAS, like it was doing with the F4 BIOS, by XMP Profile 1, and when it rebooted, nothing. Ryzen is NOT for beginners, and the way it sounds, not for you, because you can't handle a few challenges and you gotta be ready to have your troubleshooting skills tested and be ready to get into the case and move things around and DON'T GIVE UP! But it sounds like you want everything to be near perfect.

    But I got mine working again after updating to F5, even though I did think the motherboard was toast or the memory got toasted. For some reason, the BIOS reset didn't fix the memory issue, reset it to a memory speed it could handle with F5. I had to take the memory out of slots 1 and 3 and put one in slot 2 and it booted after trying all sorts of ways to reset the BIOS enough for it to work. But it did boot fine when I moved the memory out of 1 and 3 slots and one stick into slot 2, booted into Windows, reflashed back to F4 and now all is good in the world, with the memory back in slots 1 and 3, back to where I started with the lesson learned of DON'T USE THE F5 BIOS! Wait until they come out with F6 and see if that is better than F4.



    Im glad to read your post, i just had to return an ASUS ROG crosshair VI hero and Ryzen 7 1700x and swap them for new components because either the board or cpu were DOA. i was leaning towards the board as it kept giving me error code 8 on the led readout when the cpu was installed but wouldn't display anything without the cpu (which it is supposed to go into bios and allow flashing etc with no cpu, but never even got it to give me BIOS.) it had an led for cpu status and recognized when the cpu was in the socket or not (green when in and arm down red when out or arm up) and with just the cpu in i got error code 8 which is either cpu error according to their manual or the board is dead according to the rog forums i was looking on, appears overly common with that model board to be DOA with code 8 and will never post no matter what components are installed. tried 1 ram module in all 4 slots nothing tried the 2 i ahve in all possible configurations no change. tried no gpu and with gpu no change only thing that changed it was removing the cpu and doing this wouldnt allow it to do anything (obviously, but the board states it is supposed to show you bios without a cpu somehow, must have a separate chip that controls the BIOS)

    so i got my retailer to swap the cpu even for another 1700x and give me credit for the board. I got a gaming 5 as it was the only other good feature rich (and had the features i wanted like m.2 and the x370 south bridge) board they had that wasnt open box (they had an msi x370 sli plus, but it had been returned and was missing the stock bracket for the cooler mount so i suspect it had a similar issue to the board i returned as some water coolers require you remove the stock bracket, mine does, but i put the stock bracket back before returning) the ASUS board i/o cover panel also didnt fit well, it fit the case fine but i suspect the rear padding/gasket was made too thick and may have been what screwed my board up as i had to shove it down pretty hard to get the holes in the board lined up with the stands in my case with the i/o panel in. no crackling noises or bending just used more force than i though should have been appropriate on it to get it lined up. hopefully the gaming 5 wont have this issue. I went asus originally as i have one of their nicer 970 am3+ boards that was great and several other boards from them have been good, plus i like the way the pci slot locks work better than gigabyte and msi boards that seem to break too easy. i had an msi carbon 970 that i broke a pci lock on just opening it it slid out of the spot and shattered the holder tab that held it in and im weary on the gigabytes since they have similar lock mechanisms. my dad recently got a gigabyte am3+ socket board (some 970 model dont recall exact one) and it had a similar issue with the i/o cover that caused the board to need to be returned, so im hoping when i get home today and start the 3rd day of after work pc rebuilding the gaming 5 board works as it should.

    I agree with others here the challenges are kinda part of the fun, but having to drive 20+ miles to return doa products or wait for shipping back and hope they accept the return and ship a new product isnt. i can deal with issues that come up with bios updates or stability issues as long as it will post and boot i can hammer out the other issues.
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