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Laptop temperature changes with power plan?

I opened up my laptop about two weeks ago in order to clean out the dust that had become trapped in there over the years. It all worked out perfectly for about a week when I noticed my cpu temperature going as high as 70°C, I opened the laptop back up and added more thermal paste to the cpu to no avail.

I noticed a few days ago that my cpu temperature jumps up and down when changing power plans, dropping 10-12°C instantly when changing between the balanced and power saver power plan. I understand that a power saver power plan would reduce temperatures, but I doubt the change should be seen instantly.

I am using both MSI Afterburner and CPUIDs HWMonitor, they both register the same temps and drop/jump in temp at the same time. Is this an error where the software is receiving wrong info or do I have a serious hardware problem?
Reply to BernieMP
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More about laptop temperature power plan
  1. Hello... Basically if you look deeper into the setting between them (CPU freq/power) and since you have a Laptop with a very small physical mass heatsink, and very small Fans... that a small change to your CPU operational frequency will do that easily. B /
    Reply to Ironsounds
  2. Ironsounds said:
    Hello... Basically if you look deeper into the setting between them (CPU freq/power) and since you have a Laptop with a very small physical mass heatsink, and very small Fans... that a small change to your CPU operational frequency will do that easily. B /


    Thanks for the quick response, but when I say instantly I mean Afterburner will display 72°C while running Fallout shelter in the background, drop to 60°C as soon as the lower power plan is selected and spike back up to 70 when reverted, without even a seconds delay. Even my desktop gpu takes a few seconds to drop 5°C while idle with the fans at 80%, I find it unreal for a laptop to do that in a second because it downclocked the cpu.

    I don't even think that heat can be displaced that quickly, especially by a laptop.
    Reply to BernieMP
  3. Hello... I use a small free app called "RealTemp" you can see your Frequency and multiplier numbers change and the temps of each core... and you can also run a full speed test from the idle state... and watch the Core temperature instantly increase/decrease.

    https://www.techpowerup.com/download/techpowerup-real-temp/

    Another factor in heatsink performance is the material it is made of... Copper has 2x's more thermal conductance than aluminum.
    Reply to Ironsounds
  4. BernieMP said:
    I opened up my laptop about two weeks ago in order to clean out the dust that had become trapped in there over the years. It all worked out perfectly for about a week when I noticed my cpu temperature going as high as 70°C,

    Laptops are delicate, you disturbed something.

    Quote:
    I opened the laptop back up and added more thermal paste to the cpu to no avail.

    You don't ADD paste. You clean out the old stuff completely, like in a hospital germ-free, even your fingers' oil can be detrimental so you must do this carefully, THEN replace paste, again following carefully procedure. Too much paste can be as bad.
    Reply to jsmithepa
  5. Hello... Yes... with Thermal Paste less is better... it is used to remove/fill any microscopic pits/areas of AIR... since AIR has very bad thermal conductance... CPU metal to Heatsink metal contact is best situation... but having two completely flat mating surfaces is not natural or common

    Thermal paste needs to be moist to work best... So typically you remove the old paste and apply a thin New film of paste.
    Reply to Ironsounds
  6. Ironsounds said:
    Hello... Yes... with Thermal Paste less is better... it is used to remove/fill any microscopic pits/areas of AIR... since AIR has very bad thermal conductance... CPU metal to Heatsink metal contact is best situation... but having two completely flat mating surfaces is not natural or common

    Thermal paste needs to be moist to work best... So typically you remove the old paste and apply a thin New film of paste.


    http://i.imgur.com/EN8zMWi.jpg

    This is the cpu in my laptop (i7 4500u), I used a bit of paste the first time (about half of what I use on a regular cpu) and a bit more the second time around but I don't think I used enough to cover the green area. Should the paste completely cover the cpu? Or just the metal part?

    http://i.imgur.com/EN8zMWi.jpg
    Reply to BernieMP
  7. jsmithepa said:
    BernieMP said:
    I opened up my laptop about two weeks ago in order to clean out the dust that had become trapped in there over the years. It all worked out perfectly for about a week when I noticed my cpu temperature going as high as 70°C,

    Laptops are delicate, you disturbed something.

    Quote:
    I opened the laptop back up and added more thermal paste to the cpu to no avail.

    You don't ADD paste. You clean out the old stuff completely, like in a hospital germ-free, even your fingers' oil can be detrimental so you must do this carefully, THEN replace paste, again following carefully procedure. Too much paste can be as bad.


    Any idea on what I could've messed with? Mabe a temp sensor? I didn't just add the paste, I meant to say that I used more the second time.
    Reply to BernieMP
  8. Hello... You need thermal paste for just the Chips that contacts the heatsink... just a film is needed to remove any AIR pockets or un-even mounting... make sure your mating is flat... place a flat edge on the contact points/parts to examine. Don't over tighten or "Warp" your components shapes.

    Typically most heatsinks are not machined to a "true flatness" it's not un-common for me to use 'emery cloth" or "wet sanding" to a heatsink to remove high spots, groves and ridges.
    Reply to Ironsounds
  9. Ironsounds said:
    Hello... You need thermal paste for just the Chips that contacts the heatsink... just a film is needed to remove any AIR pockets or un-even mounting... make sure your mating is flat... place a flat edge on the contact points/parts to examine. Don't over tighten or "Warp" your components shapes.

    Typically most heatsinks are not machined to a "true flatness" it's not un-common for me to use 'emery cloth" or "wet sanding" to a heatsink to remove high spots, groves and ridges.


    I think I managed to fix it, I used a bit less thermal paste than the ammount I used the first time, but I also added a very thin layer on the green sides and that seems to have helped. I guess the green areas were completely exposed to the air since the metallic part of the cpu is a bit raised.

    Thanks for all the help!
    Reply to BernieMP
  10. Best answer
    Hello... just to be clear here... a thin film to the heatsink AND CPU/chips... to remove the air pockets. B ) it will take a few days to see/get the lowest temps from a new thermal paste job.

    Yes... the heatsinks and CPU LID's will NOT be totally flat... and it is not un-common to have OC'rs/benchers who will also "Lap" "grind" 'sand" or even delid the CPU. The point being metal to metal Or atom to atom is the best thermal connection here than "add more thermal paste" as a solution.
    Reply to Ironsounds
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