Avoiding Static electricity

On the floor without carpet is suitable for building PC [on bare foot and the PC will be on the ground]?

Wearing aluminium wire tied with the PC case and sitting on the floor without carpet will do also?

I didn't understand this about anti-static strap found on another thread - "Attach it to the metal computer case while the power supply is in the computer and plugged in (but set to the off position)." - It means power supply has to be placed already somehow?
Reply to Darwineine
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More about avoiding static electricity
  1. 1st: Remove the carpet.
    2nd: Unbox your PSU (doesn't have to be installed inside the PC case, can sit freely on the floor).
    3rd: Flip the switch on PSU to OFF position if it isn't already there.
    4th: Connect the power cable between PSU and mains, so the PSU would be grounded.
    5th: Attach your aluminum wire to the metal casing of your PSU.

    And you're good to go. Removing the carpet is important if you don't want to generate static electricity when moving on it. Steps 3 to 5 describes the similar way you found on another topic.

    Edit:
    If you have central heating system at your home, connect your aluminum wire to the metal pipes or metal radiator. This doesn't hinder your building process when you need to mount your PSU.
    Any metal pipe would do that goes through floors, e.g water pipes.
    Reply to Aeacus
  2. Aeacus said:
    1st: Remove the carpet.
    2nd: Unbox your PSU (doesn't have to be installed inside the PC case, can sit freely on the floor).
    3rd: Flip the switch on PSU to OFF position if it isn't already there.
    4th: Connect the power cable between PSU and mains, so the PSU would be grounded.
    5th: Attach your aluminum wire to the metal casing of your PSU.

    And you're good to go. Removing the carpet is important if you don't want to generate static electricity when moving on it. Steps 3 to 5 describes the similar way you found on another topic.

    Edit:
    If you have central heating system at your home, connect your aluminum wire to the metal pipes or metal radiator. This doesn't hinder your building process when you need to mount your PSU.
    Any metal pipe would do that goes through floors, e.g water pipes.


    I don't know why it still sounds confusing. I'll put everything on the ceramic floor ; strap the aluminium wire to the desktop-Case ; install the mainboard ; place the PSU in the case and connect to the mainboard [while the power button is turned off]. - I guess it is okay with thit?
    Reply to Darwineine
  3. i am thinking when you say carpet you're referring to a rug ? rather than an actual full floor carpet ? because the thought of removing a proper full blown carpet to build a pc has just made me nearly wet myself ! :p hahaha
    Reply to adiec
  4. Darwineine said:
    I don't know why it still sounds confusing. I'll put everything on the ceramic floor ; strap the aluminium wire to the desktop-Case ; install the mainboard ; place the PSU in the case and connect to the mainboard [while the power button is turned off]. - I guess it is okay with thit?

    Connecting the aluminum wire to the metal casing of the PC case won't do you any good since the PC case itself isn't grounded and static electricity can build up inside the metal frame.

    When i'm working with my desktop PCs, from time to time, i'm touching the metal radiator at my home which is part of central heating system to ground myself.

    This short video explains the grounding via PSU,
    youtube: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=jQRIzgEVsjI

    adiec said:
    i am thinking when you say carpet you're referring to a rug ? rather than an actual full floor carpet ? because the thought of removing a proper full blown carpet to build a pc has just made me nearly wet myself ! :p hahaha

    Carpet vs rug, it all depends how someone defines the words. In my book, rug can be an odd shape and is usually a smaller version of a carpet, just like micro-ATX case is smaller version of ATX case. :P
    Reply to Aeacus
  5. Aeacus said:

    Connecting the aluminum wire to the metal casing of the PC case won't do you any good since the PC case itself isn't grounded and static electricity can build up inside the metal frame.

    When i'm working with my desktop PCs, from time to time, i'm touching the metal radiator at my home which is part of central heating system to ground myself.

    The wire will also be attached to me, if that works [?]. The problem is that there is no metal radiator or pipe in my room. Also I have been using just the ceramic floor [built on solid concrete for sure] for the PC grounding currently, attached an aluminium wire with scotch tape to the ground. Probably doing that with the wall will work too, idk.
    Reply to Darwineine
  6. Since MoBo, RAM and CPU are the 3 main components that static discharge can damage, your best bet would be first installing the PSU into your case. After that,, connect PSU to the mains and keep the PSU switch in OFF position. This way, your entire PC case would be grounded and you can connect your aluminum wire to the PC's metal casing. After you've done it, start working with your other components.
    Reply to Aeacus
  7. Aeacus said:
    ...connect PSU to the mains...

    What do you mean by 'mains'?
    Reply to Darwineine
  8. "Mains" is one of many words for the power sockets at home.
    Further reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity
    Reply to Aeacus
  9. Aeacus said:
    "Mains" is one of many words for the power sockets at home.
    Further reading: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mains_electricity


    Oh I see, the power sockets!
    Reply to Darwineine
  10. adiec said:
    i am thinking when you say carpet you're referring to a rug ? rather than an actual full floor carpet ? because the thought of removing a proper full blown carpet to build a pc has just made me nearly wet myself ! :p hahaha

    Carpet vs rug, it all depends how someone defines the words. In my book, rug can be an odd shape and is usually a smaller version of a carpet, just like micro-ATX case is smaller version of ATX case. :P

    haha i know what you mean it depends on the area of the world you live . i just had this vision of someone destroying their home so that they could build their pc :pt1cable: and wearing a rubber/plastic suit to fight against static .:p doing $2000 worth of damage to build a $500 computer . the family returning home to find the builder sat in the middle of the floor talking to himself about static electricity whilst surrounded by shreds of carpet :pt1cable:
    Reply to adiec
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