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Cloned HDD to SDD swapped out components SDD wont boot win and is not visible in bios

Hi all,
New here and I'm sure you have gone over this more than once but I cant seem to find a thread that is having the exact issues as me. It may be that some of your resolutions would have resolved my issues anyway but I wanted to be sure.
First things first this is my first attempt at doing something like this. I spoke to a couple of people and was under the assumption that the cloned disk could just be swapped out for the old but it does not seem to be the case in my circumstance at least.
I don't know how much information you need so will give you all I can.
Its nothing fancy but all my issues stem from a horrific issue where my disk is writing at sub 3mb/s some times. Looking at advanced task manager memory and cpu never go above 80% but disk is regularly stuck at 100% with next to no read/write speed.
All components are factory other than the ssd I'm trying to install
Laptop Model :Toshiba satellite M50-A-11Q
cpu: i3
Ram 8gb
Current hdd:1tb (133gb used)
new ssd attempting to install (samsung evo 850 500gb)
migration kit used: PNY ssd migration kit (bought from curries)
Migration/cloning software Acronis True Image OEM

So I cloned the device following instructions.all seemed to be fine. I swapped out the hdd for the sdd and it would not boot. The wording being insert bootable media or something of that ilk.
Going back the the hdd works fine btw.
I checked the bios and when the sdd is connected up it just isn't present on there. I know they are the right interface (SATA) otherwise it wouldn't even plug in.
When on the hdd if I insert the sdd into the migration dock everything looks right in disk management. Partitions are all identical other than in the large partition the sdd is missing; boot,page file, crash dump) Having done a bit of research these will appear once it actually boots windows (eventually)
The other differences are Disk 0 (hdd) is listed as (c: ) and disk 1 (sdd) is listed as (e: ). Now I have been assuming this is because both drives are plugged in at the same time and by removing the hdd and fitting the sdd in its place the ssd would be moved to disk 0 and c: as no other disk would be present. This doesn't appear to be so.

So far i have seen people talking about activating ahci, turning on legacy mode and changing letter drives and paths.

Now having no experience in this stuff and not finding a carbon copy issue browsing this great forum I don't know if I need to do all of these or none of them.

I think i have given you all the information you might need (and also highlighted my ignorance in these things) but if I have missed any information please let me know and I will get back to you asap.
Apologies if I have prattled on or given you
Any and all help will be greatly appreciated
8 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about cloned hdd sdd swapped components sdd wont boot win visible bios
  1. UEFI BIOS may be messing you up here. Boot into BIOS and see if you can switch to CSM mode.
    If BIOS sees your drive but it still doesn't boot keep reading.
    This is a common occurrence. You need to fix the boot loader.
    Boot off your Windows media (either CD or USB) and repair the boot. (not reinstall, just repair)
    If you've already messed with the partitions after cloning you may need to clone again.
  2. alceryes said:
    UEFI BIOS may be messing you up here. Boot into BIOS and see if you can switch to CSM mode.
    If BIOS sees your drive but it still doesn't boot keep reading.
    This is a common occurrence. You need to fix the boot loader.
    Boot off your Windows media (either CD or USB) and repair the boot. (not reinstall, just repair)
    If you've already messed with the partitions after cloning you may need to clone again.


    Thank you for your reply.
    Initially I couldn't alter boot mode from UEFI but have now discovered "secureboot" was preventing me from changing it.As soon as I have some free time again (office is full atm) I will sort it. Already have the back up and boot drive usb made up but as it wouldn't find the ssd I couldn't restore/repair.
    Thanks again fingers crossed that's the issue!
  3. 1. It's likely the problem is simply a disk-cloning operation that has gone awry - a common problem.

    2. Presumably your laptop containing the 1 TB boot drive boots & functions without any problems, albeit slowly. You mention the system operates quite slowly but we'll attribute that (at least to some extent) to the use of a HDD as your boot drive, however, clean up your system as best you can - disk cleanup, check for malware, rid the system of unnecessary programs & other data, run the sfc /scannow command to determine if any problem with system files. In other words, general "housekeeping".

    3. I'm puzzled why you would use a "data migration" (disk-cloning) program other than the Samsung Data Migration program that presumably was bundled with your Samsung SSD. The SDM program is an effective easy-to-use program that we always recommend when the destination drive is a Samsung.

    4. In any event, repeat the disk-cloning operation using the SDM program. I do not understand why you purchased a "migration kit" involving a PNY SSD. Did this "kit' contain a USB enclosure or one of those SATA-to-USB adapters in order to connect the destination drive (your Samsung SSD) as an external USB device?

    And what would be the role of the PNY SSD? Why do you need this SSD?

    5. Ordinarily the d-c operation is a straightforward operation where a laptop/notebook is involved. The user simply connects the destination drive as an external USB drive and clones the contents of his/her present boot drive to the destination drive. There are other ways of connecting the destination drive for the purposes of the d-c operation but the USB external one is most common.

    So give it another shot and hopefully it will be successful.
  4. ArtPog said:
    1. It's likely the problem is simply a disk-cloning operation that has gone awry - a common problem.

    2. Presumably your laptop containing the 1 TB boot drive boots & functions without any problems, albeit slowly. You mention the system operates quite slowly but we'll attribute that (at least to some extent) to the use of a HDD as your boot drive, however, clean up your system as best you can - disk cleanup, check for malware, rid the system of unnecessary programs & other data, run the sfc /scannow command to determine if any problem with system files. In other words, general "housekeeping".

    3. I'm puzzled why you would use a "data migration" (disk-cloning) program other than the Samsung Data Migration program that presumably was bundled with your Samsung SSD. The SDM program is an effective easy-to-use program that we always recommend when the destination drive is a Samsung.

    4. In any event, repeat the disk-cloning operation using the SDM program. I do not understand why you purchased a "migration kit" involving a PNY SSD. Did this "kit' contain a USB enclosure or one of those SATA-to-USB adapters in order to connect the destination drive (your Samsung SSD) as an external USB device?

    And what would be the role of the PNY SSD? Why do you need this SSD?

    5. Ordinarily the d-c operation is a straightforward operation where a laptop/notebook is involved. The user simply connects the destination drive as an external USB drive and clones the contents of his/her present boot drive to the destination drive. There are other ways of connecting the destination drive for the purposes of the d-c operation but the USB external one is most common.

    So give it another shot and hopefully it will be successful.


    Thanks for another great reply. i used the pny simply because the ssd did not come with a cable and this package gave me a cable. i then just ran with the recommended programme of the kit.
    I wanted the ssd as i play games on the laptop and loading times are extremely slow.
    If changing the opiton in bios does not selve the issue i will try recloning with the samsung software.

    Thanks again
  5. Best answer
    Stop wasting your time "changing the option (sic) in bios". You're merely wasting time and worse, running the risk of possibly modifying BIOS settings that will result in an unbootable/dysfunctional system. So "cease & desist", capiche?

    Just repeat the disk-cloning operation using the Samsung Data Migration program with your SSD destination drive connected as a USB external drive.
  6. Good. That's the sensible approach at this point. Should you run into any problems arising from the d-c operation we should be able to sort them out. Good luck.
  7. Hello again guys.
    So I have tried cloning the disc with the sdm programme and the bios would still not recognise the disk when I changed them over. I then also tried altering the boot mode and this still didn't work so gone back to the hdd for now. I know the clone has worked as I have checked disk management and can launch programmes from it when connected via usb.
    I know the cable is fine as the hdd works fine. I'm really at a loss now. Any other ideas appreciated.
  8. It would appear something has gone awry with the disk-cloning operation but it's hard to tell from this distance...

    But first you have to clarify your remark that you "can launch programmes from it when connected via usb". The "it" is presumably your SSD following the disk-cloning operation?

    Are you simply indicating that following the d-c operation the SSD is now connected as a SECONDARY drive in the system (when it is USB externally-connected)? So that various programs have been cloned to the SSD and you can run those programs from the SSD?

    But when you install the SSD internally in your laptop as your boot drive, it does not boot. Is that what this is all about?

    The SSD should be simply connected to the laptop as a USB external drive for purposes of the disk-cloning operation. Either installed in a USB external enclosure or connected to a USB laptop port via a SATA-to-USB adapter cable. There is no need for a "migration kit" and I don't know if that is causing a problem here. This should be a straightforward operation using the SDM program.

    If you want to try a different program, here are some instructions for doing so...
    1. Download/install the Casper Trial Edition 10 (v10.0.6044) disk-cloning program from: https://www.fssdev.com/products/casper/trial/

    2. Before undertaking the disk-cloning operation close all open programs. (Generally you need not disable your anti-virus program). Ensure your destination drive - the proposed recipient of the clone - is properly connected in the system (see above).

    3. Click "Add drive" and a window will open listing the destination drive.

    4. Click on "Back up now".

    5. Casper will begin the disk-cloning operation running in the background. If you want to view the progress of the disk-cloning operation click on the Casper icon visible on the Taskbar or in the Notification area of the Taskbar.

    6. Casper will utilize the entire disk-space of the destination drive to contain the data contents from the source drive.

    7. Install the cloned SSD in your laptop and boot to it.
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