Error 0x0000007b while loading Win7 (classpnp.sys) after changing my CPU and motherboard

Hello!

I've changed my old motherboard and CPU to new ASUS H110M-K with newest BIOS and Pentium G4560 processor.
Earlier on my Goodram CX300 I have installed Windows7 which I used with the older motherboard and old processor.

When I changed motherboard and CPU and connected the SSD with Windows7 from old computer I got BSOD telling me the error 0000007b (problem with classpnp.sys).

The problem is with the disk controller in Windows7 which I believe is not compatibile with ASUS H110M-K which only supports AHCI (I cannot switch to IDE or SATA).

Tried everything, renamed classpnp.sys, updated to newer version, tried to boot from Windows Repair Tool (restore points, system repair, startup repair, fixing mbr in command prompt etc.) and nothing helped.

Also today connected the SSD with Windows 7 as master to my friend's PC who also have Win7...the same problem, code 0x0000007b while loading OS !
Scanned whole disk for viruses/malware and nothing. Also swapped classpnp.sys from his Windows to mine..and nothing :(

I know that Windows 10 installation would help, but I dont lose the data, passwords and software installed in my Windows 7 (upgrade from Win7 to Win10 only possible via Windows and not from the USB stick).

Thanks for the help.

Kind Regards,
Tom
Reply to TomJFD
23 answers Last reply
More about error 0x0000007b loading win7 classpnp sys changing cpu motherboard
  1. TomJFD said:
    Hello!

    I've changed my old motherboard and CPU to new ASUS H110M-K with newest BIOS and Pentium G4560 processor.
    Earlier on my Goodram CX300 I have installed Windows7 which I used with the older motherboard and old processor.

    When I changed motherboard and CPU and connected the SSD with Windows7 from old computer I got BSOD telling me the error 0000007b (problem with classpnp.sys).

    The problem is with the disk controller in Windows7 which I believe is not compatibile with ASUS H110M-K which only supports AHCI (I cannot switch to IDE or SATA).

    Tried everything, renamed classpnp.sys, updated to newer version, tried to boot from Windows Repair Tool (restore points, system repair, startup repair, fixing mbr in command prompt etc.) and nothing helped.

    Also today connected the SSD with Windows 7 as master to my friend's PC who also have Win7...the same problem, code 0x0000007b while loading OS !
    Scanned whole disk for viruses/malware and nothing. Also swapped classpnp.sys from his Windows to mine..and nothing :(

    I know that Windows 10 installation would help, but I dont lose the data, passwords and software installed in my Windows 7 (upgrade from Win7 to Win10 only possible via Windows and not from the USB stick).

    Thanks for the help.

    Kind Regards,
    Tom
    Reply to quadcomputers
  2. With a new motherboard and Windows 7, 99% of the time you have to do a clean install. The registry is configured for the old motherboard. To get rid of your blue-screens, you have to do a clean OS install.
    Reply to kanewolf
  3. Yes Windows 7 has an AHCI driver. You have to turn it ON in the system registry first. Then during your next boot enter your BIOS setup. Do a search at Microsoft for AHCI and you'll find the installation steps. IDE/SATA drivers are also provided. You will have to check with Asus and see what they have available for you. You made no mention if Asus supplied you with a driver disk. Track down your product/model and see what the Asus has for your board. To me the best drivers are theirs and the generic drivers provided by Microsoft. Yes it time consuming but not as bad as it used to be.
    Reply to quadcomputers
  4. kanewolf said:
    With a new motherboard and Windows 7, 99% of the time you have to do a clean install. The registry is configured for the old motherboard. To get rid of your blue-screens, you have to do a clean OS install.
    Reply to quadcomputers
  5. You don't have to do a clean install. That would be a last resort. When you change major hardware, Microsoft figures your trying to install their "leased" operating system into another computer. If your copy of Windows was installed by the OEM, then you have no choice but to purchase a new operating system (key) Microsoft will not honor your previous key. You won't be the first person who has been shafted out of an operating system. If you didn't try pressing F-8 to boot safe mode...you may never get back in.
    Reply to quadcomputers
  6. quadcomputers said:
    You don't have to do a clean install. That would be a last resort. When you change major hardware, Microsoft figures your trying to install their "leased" operating system into another computer. If your copy of Windows was installed by the OEM, then you have no choice but to purchase a new operating system (key) Microsoft will not honor your previous key. You won't be the first person who has been shafted out of an operating system. If you didn't try pressing F-8 to boot safe mode...you may never get back in.


    You do realize that having to reinstall is a whole different concept than the licensing and activation, right?
    You are aware of this?

    With new hardware, it may or may not boot.
    This has little or nothing to do with whether it will be unactivated or not.

    And if it was an OEM installed Windows 7, yes, that license is tied to that original hardware. This is the price you pay for getting it 'cheap'. The licensing agreement states this...and has stated this for years.
    Easy solution? Sell the old hardware with its original OS. Use those funds to purchase a new OS for your new hardware.
    Reply to USAFRet
  7. USAFRet said:
    quadcomputers said:
    You don't have to do a clean install. That would be a last resort. When you change major hardware, Microsoft figures your trying to install their "leased" operating system into another computer. If your copy of Windows was installed by the OEM, then you have no choice but to purchase a new operating system (key) Microsoft will not honor your previous key. You won't be the first person who has been shafted out of an operating system. If you didn't try pressing F-8 to boot safe mode...you may never get back in.


    You do realize that having to reinstall is a whole different concept than the licensing and activation, right?
    You are aware of this?

    With new hardware, it may or may not boot.
    This has little or nothing to do with whether it will be unactivated or not.

    And if it was an OEM installed Windows 7, yes, that license is tied to that original hardware. This is the price you pay for getting it 'cheap'. The licensing agreement states this...and has stated this for years.
    Easy solution? Sell the old hardware with its original OS. Use those funds to purchase a new OS for your new hardware.
    Reply to quadcomputers
  8. You will have to re-activate for any major hardware change. I don't how many windows system complied (unlocked or locked) or how windows systems you have installed via disk. But you don't know what your talking about.
    Reply to quadcomputers
  9. USAFRet said:
    quadcomputers said:
    You don't have to do a clean install. That would be a last resort. When you change major hardware, Microsoft figures your trying to install their "leased" operating system into another computer. If your copy of Windows was installed by the OEM, then you have no choice but to purchase a new operating system (key) Microsoft will not honor your previous key. You won't be the first person who has been shafted out of an operating system. If you didn't try pressing F-8 to boot safe mode...you may never get back in.


    You do realize that having to reinstall is a whole different concept than the licensing and activation, right?
    You are aware of this?

    With new hardware, it may or may not boot.
    This has little or nothing to do with whether it will be unactivated or not.

    And if it was an OEM installed Windows 7, yes, that license is tied to that original hardware. This is the price you pay for getting it 'cheap'. The licensing agreement states this...and has stated this for years.
    Easy solution? Sell the old hardware with its original OS. Use those funds to purchase a new OS for your new hardware.
    Reply to quadcomputers
  10. quadcomputers said:
    You will have to re-activate for any major hardware change. I don't how many windows system complied (unlocked or locked) or how windows systems you have installed via disk. But you don't know what your talking about.


    And what part of my comment says you do not have to reactivate?
    (hint...nothing)

    The necessity, or not, of having to reinstall is a whole different thing.
    Reply to USAFRet
  11. Your talking years? Do you mean when the system was a product? Rather than a lease? Back when you had legal rights of buyer vs seller? How far further back do you want to go? Windows for Workgroups or the first release of Windows 95? NO INDEED you do not have to sell your OEM windows operating system with the original hardware. I never have for any given window's operating system or personal computer. You really need to spend some time on the phone with Microsoft. Especially if your a builder, repairer, or up-grader of computer systems. Re-activation is no big problem all you need is an Internet connection. It is clear you don't know what files need to be deleted and those that need to be modified. Furthermore Microsoft will understand that your upgrading hardware. Let me tell you they know every piece of hardware and software in your system. With Windows 10 even your pictures, music, and videos. You can install and activate your own key with their software, which is included with the operating system.
    Reply to quadcomputers
  12. So what system software do you use, when you want to install and activate new keys? Why don't you just change the store and create a new one? Did you ever even call a Microsoft Tech? What are going to do if you have to fix a software problem remote?
    Reply to quadcomputers
  13. Dude...I'm not sure exactly where you're going with this, or how many years or previous OS licensing agreements you want to reference, or how many hours you've spent on the phone with MS....but the OEM licensing, pre-Win 10 Anniversary release, is quite clear on this.
    I invite you to link and quote the MS licensing agreement that says otherwise.

    Now...if you call and sweet talk MS about using an preintsalled OEM license on different hardware, that is a whole different thing.
    They are under absolutely no obligation to let you. They may, or may not.


    And of course, this has exactly zero to do with the possibility of needing to reinstall with new hardware.
    Reply to USAFRet
  14. USAFRet said:
    Dude...I'm not sure exactly where you're going with this, or how many years or previous OS licensing agreements you want to reference, or how many hours you've spent on the phone with MS....but the OEM licensing, pre-Win 10 Anniversary release, is quite clear on this.
    I invite you to link and quote the MS licensing agreement that says otherwise.

    Now...if you call and sweet talk MS about using an preintsalled OEM license on different hardware, that is a whole different thing.
    They are under absolutely no obligation to let you. They may, or may not.


    And of course, this has exactly zero to do with the possibility of needing to reinstall with new hardware.
    Reply to quadcomputers
  15. I am not a "dude".... and since 1994 and IBM and NEC backplanes, plus Microsoft's first OPEN HOUSE and release of Windows 95. Including software discounts on all their operating systems. STOP GIVING OUT FAKE HELP....
    Reply to quadcomputers
  16. quadcomputers said:
    I am not a "dude".... and since 1994 and IBM and NEC backplanes, plus Microsoft's first OPEN HOUSE and release of Windows 95. Including software discounts on all their operating systems. STOP GIVING OUT FAKE HELP....


    Oh...only since 1994?
    How quaint.

    Still, I invite you to provide a quote from MS about Win 7 and a preinstalled OEM license.
    I'll even give you a head start with the link: https://www.microsoft.com/en-us/useterms
    Reply to USAFRet
  17. Thank you for the discussion. I have bought a separate Windows 7 Ultimate x64 version so I do not worry about the license/activating.

    I would like to enter the registry to tell my Windows to turn on the AHCI, but how to do it?
    I booted Win7 with the repair disk and typed REGEDIT in command prompt, loaded hive SYSTEM from my registry and search for SCSI MINIPORT but did not found anything there that could fix my problem.
    Could you please advise how to tell my Win7 (which I dont have access to it) how it should enable the required mode for my SSD disk now?

    I checked the ASUS site for the additional software and found:
    Intel AHCI Driver Path for Windows Win7 32bit & Win7 64bit & Win8.1 64bit & Win10 64bit.

    But how to install this while I dont have access to my Windows?:)


    Thank you!
    Reply to TomJFD
  18. TomJFD said:
    Thank you for the discussion. I have bought a separate Windows 7 Ultimate x64 version so I do not worry about the license/activating.

    I would like to enter the registry to tell my Windows to turn on the AHCI, but how to do it?
    I booted Win7 with the repair disk and typed REGEDIT in command prompt, loaded hive SYSTEM from my registry and search for SCSI MINIPORT but did not found anything there that could fix my problem.
    Could you please advise how to tell my Win7 (which I dont have access to it) how it should enable the required mode for my SSD disk now?

    I checked the ASUS site for the additional software and found:
    Intel AHCI Driver Path for Windows Win7 32bit & Win7 64bit & Win8.1 64bit & Win10 64bit.

    But how to install this while I dont have access to my Windows?:)


    Thank you!


    OK then...an OS that you bought. No prob.

    Enabling AHCI mode after the install: http://forums.guru3d.com/showthread.php?t=313676

    Or, if this is a brand new install with not much in it...start over with a clean install.
    Enable AHCI in the BIOS before you install the OS.
    After that, do the actual reinstall.


    If your currently installed OS does not run at all, that is a different issue, and you may want to just start over again.
    Reply to USAFRet
  19. Builders editions of windows are not true OEM. OEM is the supercheap, no MS support, tied to the hardware its installed on, version that big OEM's Like Dell, HP, & Toshiba provide with their PC's. To install these OEM versions to alternate hardware normally requires a call to MS and its their call if they grant the install or tell you to go buy a new copy. I've never been denied either but I've met people that have. I believe its all in how you present the situation to the MS staff... :)
    Reply to popatim
  20. My motherboard ASUS H110M-K has AHCI enabled by default and there is no possibility to turn it off or to enable IDE or other instances of SATA.

    I cannot much do nothing because I have only an access to SSD by command prompt and I can only run Windows 7 repair tool which allows me to make a clean install of Win7...but then I will lose all my files and settings from my actual Win7 instance.

    I would like to repair the problem with classpnp.sys and the controller, maybe the files from ASUS manufacturer support site are the solution, but it is an EXE x64 file which I cant run in command prompt.

    Very curious is when I connect my SSD to another friend computer from year 2009 as primary boot disk - it also gives my a 0000007b error...

    Thank you!

    TomJFD said:



    Thank you!

    OK then...an OS that you bought. No prob.

    Enabling AHCI mode after the install: http://forums.guru3d.com/showthread.php?t=313676

    Or, if this is a brand new install with not much in it...start over with a clean install.
    Enable AHCI in the BIOS before you install the OS.
    After that, do the actual reinstall.


    If your currently installed OS does not run at all, that is a different issue, and you may want to just start over again.
    Reply to TomJFD
  21. TomJFD said:


    I cannot much do nothing because I have only an access to SSD by command prompt and I can only run Windows 7 repair tool which allows me to make a clean install of Win7...but then I will lose all my files and settings from my actual Win7 instance.



    A clean install may be your only option.
    Reply to USAFRet
  22. I have and can install any operating system. I can install and upgrade any system. You might want to download Microsoft's pre-install and configuration software it's FREE. If can be installed from a thumb drive, a disk, or removable disk or related media. It was designed for nitwits who don't know the operating system or how to recover in real mode. I think you might find it most useful. There is nothing to do with an ignorant arse... other then say.... "bugger off"
    Reply to quadcomputers2
  23. quadcomputers2 said:
    I have and can install any operating system. I can install and upgrade any system. You might want to download Microsoft's pre-install and configuration software it's FREE. If can be installed from a thumb drive, a disk, or removable disk or related media. It was designed for nitwits who don't know the operating system or how to recover in real mode. I think you might find it most useful. There is nothing to do with an ignorant arse... other then say.... "bugger off"



    Instead of insults and attitude, and vague reference to a MS tool...why don't you inform the OP and the rest of the class which tool (Sysprep?) you are referring to, how to use it, and how it will 'fix' his system without losing all his files and setting.
    Reply to USAFRet
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