Solved

Is really worth upgrading to an NVMe M.2 SSD from a SATA SSD?

Hey everyone,

First off, here are my system specs:

CPU: I7 5820k OC'd to 3.9 ghz
RAM: 32GB DD4 @ 2133 mhz
GPU: Geforce GTX 1080 ti
Storage: 1 SK Hynix 512 GB SATA SSD (for Windows & apps), 1 Samsung 500 GB 850 EVO SATA SSD (For games), 1 Western Digital 4tb hdd @ 5400 rpm (solely for storage).

Here's my situation: I currently have 2 SATA SSDs, one for Windows & apps, & the other strictly for games. I also have a 4tb mechanical hdd that I use strictly for storage. I'm toying with the idea of adding a Samsung 960 PRO NVMe M.2 SSD, but I'm not really sure if it's worth the added expense or inconvenience of having to migrate to a new primary drive.

I've seen the benchmarks for the 960 PRO, and they are impressive. However, what do they really mean in every day operations? Will Windows suddenly load instantaneously, or frame rates for high-end games like Ghost Recon: Wildlands enjoy a sharp increase?

My system right now is fairly fast. I have no real complaints. However, if this technology is really such a massive leap forward in terms of every day performance, I'll definitely take the plunge.

What do you guys think?
7 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about worth upgrading nvme ssd sata ssd
  1. The main thing is does it support NVME ?? Does a BIOS update support it?
  2. Paul NZ said:
    The main thing is does it support NVME ?? Does a BIOS update support it?


    Yes. With the latest BIOS updates, my mobo does support it. With the mobo I do have, however, I will need a PCIe adapter for the 960 PRO (blasted Alienware), but I've seen posts by people who have done this with this system with no problem. That said, that's just one more thing making me a little gun shy about making this upgrade.
  3. I wouldn't bother, especially if you have to use an adapter.
    That drive would be 'faster', but not faster like the difference between an HDD and the SSD's you currently have.

    Game FPS? Ha...no.
    Windows startup? Not 'instantly'.


    If you were building a new PC, with the required port built in...then OK.
  4. USAFRet said:
    I wouldn't bother, especially if you have to use an adapter.
    That drive would be 'faster', but not faster like the difference between an HDD and the SSD's you currently have.

    Game FPS? Ha...no.
    Windows startup? Not 'instantly'.


    If you were building a new PC, with the required port built in...then OK.


    Would you happen to know if there is any performance degradation that results from using an adapter of this sort? If that's the case, I definitely won't bother.
  5. puggy718 said:
    USAFRet said:
    I wouldn't bother, especially if you have to use an adapter.
    That drive would be 'faster', but not faster like the difference between an HDD and the SSD's you currently have.

    Game FPS? Ha...no.
    Windows startup? Not 'instantly'.


    If you were building a new PC, with the required port built in...then OK.


    Would you happen to know if there is any performance degradation that results from using an adapter of this sort? If that's the case, I definitely won't bother.


    That might depend on which PCI-E port, what other PCI-E devices you have connected, etc, etc...
    But it can't be as fast as connecting it with a dedicated port.
  6. Additionally, you have to determine if your motherboard can actually boot from that.
    Not all of that vintage can.
  7. Best answer
    I have Samsung 960 evo and I do play GR:Wildlands. FPS is no better. The only thing that is better is loading times. After I've pressed ESC 3 times to skip the intro etc it takes me roughly 10 secs to load into the game.
    5 secs after I click continue and 5 secs after I click 'launch'.

    This is on a Ryzen system (B350 chipset) which has an M.2 slot which I am using.
    I also have Windows on said Samsung 960 and it boots just fine. Takes around 5-10 secs after BIOS screen to reach desktop.

    From what little testing I have done, Samsung Evo should be 5-6 times faster than a normal SSD. At least in Crystaldiskmark, a synthetic benchmark. So 2200-3000 megs per sec in a best case scenario.
Ask a new question

Read More

SSD Intel i7 CPUs SATA