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Which X370 AM4 MBO (Asus ROG Crosshair VI Hero or Gigabyte Aorus AX370 Gaming K7)

Hey there guys - as many people these days, I also plan to go with AMD Ryzen CPU as my next upgrade path. And for that I would love to get also new motherboard. While I decided to go with R7 1700 and just overclock it, with motherboards it is a tiny bit trickier. After some research I narrowed it down to two boards.

Because I have ability to get them both for around same price (despite what links I posted say) it really depends on "What is better". And that's what I would love to hear from you guys - which board is in your opinion and experience (if you have one or both of these) better? Should I grab Asus for more USB and better audio (+ RGB sync with my Asus GPU) or go with Gigabytes slightly better aesthetics, more sturdy PCIe and HDMI output if I'll ever need it? What are pros and cons both of them?

Thanks for the help :)
Reply to Akkaeno
7 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about x370 am4 mbo asus rog crosshair hero gigabyte aorus ax370 gaming
  1. that's funny, i am in the same boat and just posted a question like yours but the mobos i am considering are :

    ASrock Fatal1ty K4 (because i neither care about WiFi or 5Gbit LAN), ASRock Taichi (because i want to know whether a 16 power phase VRM makes a difference when OC), and Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming K7 (rev. 1.0).

    but honestly, i am starting to doubt whether switching to the dark side (ie AMD) is worth it. i just read a review on a german site consistently showing the i7-6900K beating the pants off the Ryzen 7 1800 on all major games. and here i was thinking AMD had finally risen (no pun intended) to kick Intel's ass. perhaps not after all, and a Z270 board still makes more sense than the newfangled X370.

    what do you guys think?
    Reply to __Isomorph__
  2. Best answer
    I've had the ASUS ROG Crosshair VI Hero board since release day and I'd buy it again. I'd also recommend it to anyone who asks. Good features on the board and awesome BIOS.

    We get direct support from a couple of ASUS employees on different forums, plus access to different BIOS versions to play with and test before they go on the official download page. Plus programs like HWinfo64 have been getting frequent updates to work with the C6H board.

    As far as AMD versus Intel in gaming...

    Yes right now Ryzen loses out on gaming -- but it's not "beating the pants off" level. Games will be patched (as we have already seen with Ashes of the Singularity) and Ryzen will improve. If you're looking for straight maximum FPS numbers for E-peen stroking right away, then go Intel. If you're looking for actual playable performance and have some patience for improvements that will come in the future, then go Ryzen.

    I haven't met a game that isn't playable on my system (1700 @ 3.8GHz, GTX 1080, 16GB 3200 RAM) at 1440p with maxed detail settings.
    Reply to Leaps-from-Shadows
  3. alright, thanks. i keep seeing a particular and what seems like a widespread fondness for ASUS ROG C6H. as a 1st-timer who never owned an ASUS mobo b4, i gotta wonder: what's ASUS got over Gigabyte or ASRock or MSI boards?
    Reply to __Isomorph__
  4. was just reading the parts re VRM in the ASUS Prime x370-Pro manual and correct me if i am wrong, but it seems that with a mobo like the Prime which has less phase than the ASRock Taichi, you get higher loads and thus a higher thermal profile, which would explain why the Taichi mobo performs so well on thermal benchmarks. now, re the ASUS mobo, doesn't it automatically switch down freq when it detects excessive thermal load if you get too enthusiastic and get carried away pushing voltage a little too far?
    Reply to __Isomorph__
  5. i was wondering myself and i found this answer: in short, ASRock Taichi is the superior mobo now.

    you can find out why here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ylvdSnEbL50
    and
    here: http://www.hardwaresecrets.com/everything-you-need-to-know-about-the-motherboard-voltage-regulator-circuit/

    pay close attention to this article as understanding the VRM and voltage phases is key in deciding which mobo is better, in addition to how many non-shared lanes are available to all the mobo key components (CPU, DRAM, PCIe slots, M2, U2)--the more lanes available to your gfx cards, dram, SSD M2 drives, the less bottleneck and the faster your whole computing experience; in other words, shared lanes == less performance. now i understand why some go with a server board for the higher non-shared count thus improving I/O throughput.

    go ASRock! ;)

    Akkaeno said:
    Hey there guys - as many people these days, I also plan to go with AMD Ryzen CPU as my next upgrade path. And for that I would love to get also new motherboard. While I decided to go with R7 1700 and just overclock it, with motherboards it is a tiny bit trickier. After some research I narrowed it down to two boards.

    Because I have ability to get them both for around same price (despite what links I posted say) it really depends on "What is better". And that's what I would love to hear from you guys - which board is in your opinion and experience (if you have one or both of these) better? Should I grab Asus for more USB and better audio (+ RGB sync with my Asus GPU) or go with Gigabytes slightly better aesthetics, more sturdy PCIe and HDMI output if I'll ever need it? What are pros and cons both of them?

    Thanks for the help :)
    Reply to __Isomorph__
  6. __Isomorph__ said:
    that's funny, i am in the same boat and just posted a question like yours but the mobos i am considering are :

    ASrock Fatal1ty K4 (because i neither care about WiFi or 5Gbit LAN), ASRock Taichi (because i want to know whether a 16 power phase VRM makes a difference when OC), and Gigabyte GA-AX370-Gaming K7 (rev. 1.0).

    but honestly, i am starting to doubt whether switching to the dark side (ie AMD) is worth it. i just read a review on a german site consistently showing the i7-6900K beating the pants off the Ryzen 7 1800 on all major games. and here i was thinking AMD had finally risen (no pun intended) to kick Intel's ass. perhaps not after all, and a Z270 board still makes more sense than the newfangled X370.

    what do you guys think?


    Hey Isomorph,

    I will start with your last comment first. There are a number of factors to consider.

    1. Price - The 6900k is a $1k processor. You can pick up a 1800x on eBay for $350.

    2. Gaming performance - Intel at this point has the upper hand and probably always will from an OC perspective. You have to remember that AMD built these chips to be multi-taskers, media processors, and gaming. Intel has purely focused on the OC and thus made their chips perform beautifully in that space. In my case I need a chip that I can use to game and process 4k files from premier. The 1800x beats the shit out of the 6900k when it comes to post processing 4k files. I can even play games while it does it in the background because of the additional cores and lanes.

    3. Beta Product- You have to remember this is the first time in a decade that AMD has been able to regain marketshare and compete. This influx of revenue and demand in their product will lead to increased awareness of these issues. They will be working overtime and adding new employees to release new BIOS updates quarterly to improve gaming performance. Additionally, game developers will now tweak their games to perform both on Intel and AMD, something that hasn't happened since the early 2000s. The new xbox scropio for instance runs on a modded ryzen chip. Lots of potential at a cheaper price point.

    Now to your first question on mobos. This is personal preference.

    1. Asus Crosshair - This has always been known in the market as the experimental board. People at that purchase this board consider themselves tinkers. They are constantly playing with BIOS settings, memory settings, beta bios updates etc... If you are not that person, don't focus on this board.

    2. Gigabyte - Great all around board with a lower price point with steady bios updates and great features. It still offers a ton of potential for tinkering but has known to be more reliable and secure. There are no as many things you can mess with that will brick your BIOS. Also they have a reputation for being more "cautious" about updates. They wait for it to be tested a bit more before releasing betas etc... If you still want serious performance with more security grab this board.

    Also, the money you save on the 1800x you can buy a GTX 1080 or upgrade to a Ti
    Reply to Builderman86
  7. thanks a lot for the reply. it clarified a lot.
    Reply to __Isomorph__
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