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Necessary upgrades before overclocking system

My rig is currently as listed below. It's still going strong and has never been overclocked but I'm looking at doing some overclocking (ideally CPU & GPU) to squeeze a bit of extra power out of it.

Is there any upgrades (PSU for example) I should definitely do before attempting to overclocking?


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  1. u r good to go. even the psu is a good one. but what cpu cooler do u have?
  2. Best answer
    As with any overclocking, I suggest it is better to take the time to understand the basics of what you are doing...
    Take it in small steps, perhaps by bumping the multipliers up by 1 at a time and only increasing voltage if it is required.

    Use a program like MSI Afterburner (for the GPU) and CoreTemp to check temperatures and speeds.
    As a rule of thumb, the overclock is good when the computer does not crash and nothing gets too got - this is usually 80c +

    If you need any guidance on how to do the overclock, you are very welcome to ask!
    Lots of other forum members are here to help too :)
  3. If you still have stock cooler on the CPU you will need a good CPU cooler. Rest looks OK.

    Another upgrade could be dust-busting in your case and your components. Get a can of compressed air, unplug the machine, keep the power button pressed for 30 seconds (leftover power in capacitors HURTS).

    Or just get a vaccumcleaner and do it like a savage.
  4. NDC1995 said:
    If you still have stock cooler on the CPU you will need a good CPU cooler. Rest looks OK.

    Another upgrade could be dust-busting in your case and your components. Get a can of compressed air, unplug the machine, keep the power button pressed for 30 seconds (leftover power in capacitors HURTS).

    Or just get a vaccumcleaner and do it like a savage.


    You do not need an upgraded cooler for overclocking, but it is strongly recommended. The stock cooler has very little spare room for cooling a CPU using more than stock power, and will prevent anything more than a mild overclock due to the temperatures rising too high.

    As for said dust busting - I would say to do this outside if its from a can. They used to contain hydrocarbons like butane, which is highly flammable and could explode if there was fire nearby. Newer ones apparently contain fluorocarbons but you do not want to breathe it in too much. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gas_duster

    Personally I disassemble the cooler on my GPUs and take a vacuum cleaner nozzle on low power to clean it up, and stick a paintbrush in it to free up and stubborn stuff. Same for my CPU cooler.
  5. A can of compreased air is not dangerous . Unless you puropsely breath the stuff in or you got some condition. Have a window open if you are worried.

    This is for digitalhamster.
  6. NDC1995 said:
    A can of compreased air is not dangerous . Unless you puropsely breath the stuff in or you got some condition. Have a window open if you are worried.


    I agree with you there :)
  7. Before you buy an expensive cooler, find out if your CPU is a good overclocker. (which you can do using the stock cooler)
    A general guideline is that CPUs like yours require 0.05V more for every 100Mhz speed increase, and that 1.3V is a lot of voltage for an air cooled 4670k.
    My CPU can do 4.2Ghz at under 1.1 Volts Vcore, implying that it would go to about 4.6Ghz air cooled before hitting temperature and voltage limits.
    Find out how fast your CPU can go at 1.1 Volts Vcore, and you will have a good idea if you were lucky or not in the silicon lottery... and therefore if it is worth buying a big cooler or not...
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