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Need specific help upgrading OLD pc over time.

I have a very tight budget and dont really want to spend on my pc but I kind of miss pc gaming so I need to figure out is it worth upgrading parts over time or buying a new super cheap budget gaming pc and scrap this one totally. I want to prepare for games like Destiny 2 and so on. Would it be worth it to just throw a gtx 1060 in this setup? Thanks in advance.

i5-750 on an Asus P7P55D pro mobo
gtx 760
xfx 750w PSU
gskill 8gb ram I think its DDR3
6 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about specific upgrading time
  1. I think it's gonna bottleneck a bit, but to keep up better in modern games, GPU is the way to go.

    If you play games heavier on the CPU, then a new motherboard, CPU, and RAM on a new platform is more necessary.
  2. Well the good news is that plenty of games are quite playable with your setup as-is on medium-high settings at 1080p

    The bad news is that CPU is quite far behind its modern brothers and you will suffer big frame dips in cpu heavy games like MMOs

    What's your country and budget?
  3. y. a 1060 would be fine in that rig. you will notice higher utilization on the cpu side, but it would require a new platform to even it out.
  4. Im in the US and I havent really thought about the budget. I guess Im trying to figure out if it would be worth it to just upgrade the GPU only or better to do an overall upgrade but total budget of like 350 maybe. If I did a budget build with an i3 and DDR4 ram I could cannibalize my HDDs, CD/DVD, PSU and case so I guess Im just thinking about upgrading cpu, mobo, ram and gpu. Is it a big deal to go to DDR4?

    I guess what Im trying to say is spend 350 on a gpu or 350 on a gpu cpu mobo and ram?
  5. At stock speeds, an Intel Pentium G4560 beats/equals it, yes, but that's a $45 for 8 GB DDR4 RAM, a $70 B250 Motherboard, and $65 for the CPU itself when it gets back in stock at mainstream places. You can keep the 760 for medium settings on decently GPU-utilizing games, or get a GTX 1060/RX 480 for around $260 for most of them.

    You can reuse hard drives and such with SATA connectors, but you'll likely need a freshly installed OS and drivers, otherwise you get terribly inconvenient crashes and buggy funcitonality. If you have a retail key then you should be able to do it fine with the key you have, OEM keys can't be reused so you gotta buy a new key.

    Or just buy a GTX 1060, use DDU to uninstall 760's drivers and install 1060 drivers, be out $260 and be done with it, enjoy your ultra settings :)
  6. Best answer
    breakdown00 said:
    Im in the US and I havent really thought about the budget. I guess Im trying to figure out if it would be worth it to just upgrade the GPU only or better to do an overall upgrade but total budget of like 350 maybe. If I did a budget build with an i3 and DDR4 ram I could cannibalize my HDDs, CD/DVD, PSU and case so I guess Im just thinking about upgrading cpu, mobo, ram and gpu. Is it a big deal to go to DDR4?

    I guess what Im trying to say is spend 350 on a gpu or 350 on a gpu cpu mobo and ram?

    DDR3 to DDR4 isn't a big deal, CPU & GPU have a way bigger impact.

    I could understand if you went GPU upgrade first, but if I were in your shoes I'd do the CPU first:

    PCPartPicker part list / Price breakdown by merchant

    CPU: Intel Core i5-7500 3.4GHz Quad-Core Processor ($189.49 @ OutletPC)
    Motherboard: Gigabyte GA-B250M-DS3H Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard ($69.89 @ OutletPC)
    Memory: G.Skill Ripjaws V Series 16GB (2 x 8GB) DDR4-2666 Memory ($99.97 @ Jet)
    Total: $359.35
    Prices include shipping, taxes, and discounts when available
    Generated by PCPartPicker 2017-04-01 05:21 EDT-0400

    I don't see the point in buying an i3 this generation, as the G4560 (a $60 cpu) has hyperthreading and gives 95% of the performance for 1/2 of the price. But in CPU heavy games you'd see much better minimum frame rates jumping in for another i5.

    My thoughts on CPU first are; if your gtx 760 is struggling you can always fiddle with the graphics, but if your 1st gen i5 is struggling you're stuck. Either way though, I suspect one upgrade will follow the other soon enough :)

    You should also consider investing in a solid state drive at some point, they're not necessary for gaming but they do make an impact on the overall snapiness of your setup
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