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Upgrading SSD to SSD.. Worth it?

My first purchase of an ssd is Intel's 530 series 120gb. Which launched in Q3, 2013. It has been around for 4 years of usage now and i am thinking about upgrading it. All i need is 120gb of space is enough and i have research for some of the higher-end ssd around my town that are selling.
First, do you think upgrading my 530's ssd to a newer ones are worth it? I do note that when i bought the 530 ssd, it is one of the higher end ssd on the market so will i see a speed improvements or not? If yes, these are the ones that is selling right now.

These are the ones that are in stock right now:
Corsair Force LE200
Toshiba Q300 PRO

Link for my old Intel's SSD: Here
11 answers Last reply Best Answer
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  1. depend on what you use your pc for.
  2. rgd1101 said:
    depend on what you use your pc for.


    just everyday use like browsing and some heavy application loadinmg like photoshop and vegas also
  3. Best answer
    Personally I would, not for performance, but don't the earlier intel SSD's have a habit of failing less than gracefully? i.e. they'll warn you that they have reached theoretical end of life and then just fail on the next boot?
  4. 13thmonkey said:
    Personally I would, not for performance, but don't the earlier intel SSD's have a habit of failing less than gracefully? i.e. they'll warn you that they have reached theoretical end of life and then just fail on the next boot?


    Really...? I have never heard of that before, its all working perfectly fine in my computer right now.
  5. I may be wrong, but most will slow down as they find that they have to 'hunt' for good cells to write data to, intel say that if 5PB is the limit, then they just stop. I'm not sure if it is 5PB or 5Y...
  6. 13thmonkey said:
    I may be wrong, but most will slow down as they find that they have to 'hunt' for good cells to write data to, intel say that if 5PB is the limit, then they just stop. I'm not sure if it is 5PB or 5Y...


    What is PB? I can remember that when i first bought it, the seller says that intel's ssd have 3 years warranty and data recovery program in the warranty period.
  7. @13thmonkeys:
    It is a bit complicated to tell, if the SSD has reached the limit of it's live or not.
    It has too many factors including how much data was being written and how often incl. if the OS support TRIM.
    However, The smaller the SSD, the lower the theoretical live limit should be since you have less cell selection to rewritten, thus rewrite will be more often on the same cells.
    I still have Crucial M4 128GB from 2012, this SSD is still working without flaws and the speed is still relatively the same.
  8. guanyu210379 said:
    @13thmonkeys:
    It is a bit complicated to tell, if the SSD has reached the limit of it's live or not.
    It has too many factors including how much data was being written and how often incl. if the OS support TRIM.
    However, The smaller the SSD, the lower the theoretical live limit should be since you have less cell selection to rewritten, thus rewrite will be more often on the same cells.
    I still have Crucial M4 128GB from 2012, this SSD is still working without flaws and the speed is still relatively the same.



    From my knowledge, the biggest factor is the ssd flash memory cells like slc tlc annd mlc.
  9. krit2 said:
    guanyu210379 said:
    @13thmonkeys:
    It is a bit complicated to tell, if the SSD has reached the limit of it's live or not.
    It has too many factors including how much data was being written and how often incl. if the OS support TRIM.
    However, The smaller the SSD, the lower the theoretical live limit should be since you have less cell selection to rewritten, thus rewrite will be more often on the same cells.
    I still have Crucial M4 128GB from 2012, this SSD is still working without flaws and the speed is still relatively the same.



    From my knowledge, the biggest factor is the ssd flash memory cells like slc tlc annd mlc.


    PetaBytes (as in the amount written)

    I agree it is difficult, and intel took a really simple route, as soon as a certain write limit is crossed, or a certain time period, then stop, become read only, and 'die' on the next boot. Others just slow down, find it more difficult to write, the read slows as error checking gets harder, and then they eventually die, with warnings given via the performance.

    Near the top here: https://www.reddit.com/r/buildapc/comments/31qm1d/discussion_whats_the_deal_with_intels_ssds_why/

    First couple of paragraphs, by design apparently, not an aberrant behaviour.
    http://www.zdnet.com/article/ssd-endurance-death-by-petabyte/

    Note it is the wear indicator (driven by writes, not actual wear) that flips it to read only, note in late 2016 they changed from dead to stay in read only I think.
    http://www.intel.com/content/www/us/en/support/memory-and-storage/000022714.html

    http://www.tomshardware.co.uk/intel-ssd-endurance-600p-mwi,news-53926.html
  10. The used slc, mlc, etc. cell types determines the basic rewrite cycles live time.
    The rest is still like I wrote.
    The basic logic here --> the more often you rewrite that cell, the faster that cell will die.
    This makes things a bit complex in determining live span of an SSD, since you can not really tell when and how often it is being rewritten during your usage.
  11. guanyu210379 said:
    The used slc, mlc, etc. cell types determines the basic rewrite cycles live time.
    The rest is still like I wrote.
    The basic logic here --> the more often you rewrite that cell, the faster that cell will die.
    This makes things a bit complex in determining live span of an SSD, since you can not really tell when and how often it is being rewritten during your usage.


    most tools, like crystal, will tell you precisely how much has been written
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