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Cloning from 250GB HDD to 3TB HDD

I think I need all the help I can get here, unfortunately: as I've said, I have a 250gb hard drive I'm trying to clone from. I purchased a new 3tb hard drive. I do not know much about this topic, but it is sort of urgent for me that I clone all of my data and the Windows 7 os to my next hard drive.

I can't tell what format the two drives are now in, but I thought I could quickly clone just simply by using macrium reflect. I went into computer management with the help of a friend and got the new hdd online. I ran the software and got it to clone somewhat, it stopped at 79%. If I remember correctly it said something like the two numbers 13 and 32. I tried typing in something I Googled along the lines of chkdsk /r /c or something, that ran but I don't know what happened after I rebooted the computer and waited a few hours for that to do its thing.

I'm pretty desperate at this point, I need room for more files and such, and I would like to use as much of my new hard drive's storage as possible. I know nothing about this otherwise.
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More about cloning 250gb hdd 3tb hdd
  1. You might have a problem or two.
    your computer is old, windows 7, it doesn't likely have UEFI bios support and as such, it will not support new GPT partitioning for hard disks on boot.
    you CANNOT use more space than 2TB on disks with old MBR partition table, which WILL be used if you clone old hard disk with said partition table in it.

    That said, you should still be able to use the old disk as windows/boot drive and use the new one as storage just fine. (This is assuming that you need new disk only for extra storage space)

    error 13 on macrium means read error, you have tried chkdsk already but if that didn't fix it (you would need to try to clone it again) you might need diagnostic tools of 250GB disks's manufacturer.
  2. Alright, I'm fine with using the new one for storage. Would you mind telling me what to do then to make that happen? Chkdsk did it's thing, but I thought I was supposed to get some sort of log or message from it, but instead it went straight to me choosing a user and going about my business. If I need to change format or something I have no clue what I need to do. If I'm using the new drive as storage I have no idea what to do, with partitions or formatting. It already has files it seems from my old hard drive, but I don't know how I'm going to make it so that I can easily save and access files to the new one, etc.
  3. for log on what chkdsk found and/or did:
    https://www.sevenforums.com/tutorials/96938-check-disk-chkdsk-read-event-viewer-log.html

    Before going forward with use of said drive, you should check the situation in disk management though, in case the cloning used just 250GB of new disk or... something weird like that.
    https://www.lifewire.com/how-to-open-disk-management-2626080
    If the disk has only one partition (and lot of unallocated space) then you would need to either resize the partition if it allows that or delete it and create it again. (We can assume that the files are still on old 250GB drive)

    As for storage use, as you can see yourself, the new disk appears as another drive letter (like D or E) and you would just need to save/load files from there instead of the default localtion.
    Following might help though:
    http://www.techsupportalert.com/content/how-move-windows-7-personal-folders-my-documents-another-drive.htm
  4. 1. It's vital that the source & destination disks involved in the disk-cloning process are non-defective. Also, that the source disk (the drive that will be cloned) contains an OS that is non-corrupt and boots and functions without problems.

    2. Can we be assured that your 250 GB HDD that serves as your present boot drive meets the above criteria?

    3. We'll assume that your new 3 TB HDD that will serve as the destination disk is non-defective.

    4. There should be no problem with the Macrium Reflect program carrying out a successful disk-cloning operation should the above criteria be met.

    5. While I've worked with the Macrium program and found it generally effective, it's not my usual disk-cloning ("data migration") program that I work with. I generally use the Casper disk-cloning program. However, it's a commercial program costing $49.99 and I assume you're interested in a freely-available cloning program.

    6. Casper does have a Trial Edition available and I'm suggesting you use it and follow the instructions I'll provide.

    7. You did not indicate how your 3 TB HDD is connected in your system - whether it's internally-connected or connected as a USB external drive. I'll assume it's internally-connected.

    NOW BEFORE WE START YOU SHOULD BE AWARE OF THE FOLLOWING...
    I'M ASSUMING YOUR 250 GB HDD HAS BEEN MBR-PARTITIONED. THAT BEING THE CASE THE DISK-CLONING OPERATION WILL ALSO CREATE A MBR-PARTITIONED DISK ON YOUR DESTINTION DRIVE, THE 3 TB HDD. IT DOESN'T MATTER IF YOU FIRST PARTITIONED YOUR 3 TB HDD WITH THE GPT-PARTITIONING SCHEME BEFORE THE DISK-CLONING OPERATION; IT WILL STILL BEAR THE MBR-PARTITIONING SCHEME FOLLOWING THE DISK-CLONING OPERATION. CAPICHE?
    THAT MEANS THE 3 TB HDD WILL HAVE ONLY AVAILABLE DISK-SPACE OF ABOUT 2048 GB (2 TB); THE REMAINING DISK-SPACE OF 746.52 GB WILL BE UNALLOCATED AND UNUSABLE WHILE THE HDD IS MBR-PARTITIONED.
    UNFORTUNATELY, BECAUSE THE 3 TB HDD WILL NOW (FOLLOWING THE DISK-CLONING OPERATION) CONTAIN AN OS, I AM NOT AWARE OF ANY RELIABLE CONVERSION PROCESS THAT WILL CONVERT THE DISK TO THE GPT-PARTITIONING SCHEME SO THAT THE ENTIRE 3 TB (2794 GB) OF DISK-SPACE WILL BE USABLE.
    AND AFAIK, YOUR SOURCE DISK SIMILIARLY CANNOT BE CONVERTED TO GPT IN ITS PRESENT FORM.

    SO YOU MAY WANT TO RETHINK YOUR DESIRE TO GO AHEAD WITH THE DISK-CLONING OPERATION UNDER THE PRESENT CIRCUMSTANCES.

    8. Download/install the Casper Trial Edition 10 (v10.0.6044) disk-cloning program from: https://www.fssdev.com/products/casper/trial/

    9. Before undertaking the disk-cloning operation close all open programs. (Generally you need not disable your anti-virus program). Ensure your destination drive - the proposed recipient of the clone - is properly connected in the system. It can either be installed internally in the system (presumably a desktop PC), or externally as a USB device should you be using a laptop/notebook.

    10. Click "Add drive" and a window open listing the destination drive. Ensure that's the correct drive you desire as the recipient of the clone (just in case other multiple drives are connected). Click on that disk's listing and then "Yes" on the confirmation message that follows.

    11. Click on "Back up now" (after again assuring that it's the right drive you desire to receive the cloned contents of the source disk).

    12. Casper will begin the disk-cloning operation running in the background. If you want to view the progress of the disk-cloning operation click on the Casper icon visible on the Taskbar or in the Notification area of the Taskbar.

    13. Following the successful disk-cloning operation disconnect (when practicable) the source drive from the system and boot solely to the connected destination drive. As a general proposition it's a good idea (whenever practical) for the newly-cloned drive to be connected to the motherboard's first SATA data connector, usually designated SATA 0 or SATA 1.
    Also, check the system's BIOS/UEFI to ensure the cloned drive is now first in boot priority order.

    14. If your destination disk was connected as a USB external drive for the disk-cloning operation, boot to it to determine whether it's a bootable drive while connected as a USB external device. Ensure you select the drive from the boot menu during bootup. If it's unbootable while connected as a USB external drive (since many systems will balk at booting from a USB device), most likely it will be bootable when connected internally in the system.

    15. Casper will utilize the entire disk-space of the destination drive to contain the data contents from the source drive.

    Let us know of what you've decided.
  5. Well, I don't know that I can make a decision, a smart one anyways. Whatever you think would be more desirable I guess. Using all 3TB is preferable, but if I can only really use 2, so be it.

    I'll try using Casper when I get to my house in 20 minutes, unless I can easily use my new hard drive as storage, seeing as the more storage the better in my case. Is there any downside to simply keeping both drives? Aside from me not knowing exactly how I'll make everything tie together, making steam games download and save the entire steam file to the new drive, etc.

    One thing I would love to try is somehow just start fresh on the new hard drive, and then bring certain files over from my old hard drive. I don't have a windows disk or USB or anything, and I'm using a windows 7 automatic keygen and apply program, as I already had windows on this computer but one of those update errors left me and many windows users with an "ingenuine" copy of windows.
  6. Best answer
    There's no downside that occurs to me in carrying out the disk-cloning operation so that the 3 TB is a clone of your 250 GB HDD understanding the limitations involved as I previously described them
    I'm assuming, of course, that you're working with a genuine, activated, licensed copy of the Windows 7 OS. If that is not the case then you should pursue this aspect with Microsoft.
  7. Alright well I shall try just using Casper for now, thanks
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