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My old hard drive is maxed out for disk usage.

I recently built a new gaming computer, after my laptop stopped working. I plugged the old hard drive into the new computer and many problems have arose from it. I have checked that the boot order is not the problem. But half the time my computer won't boot if I have the drive plugged in. Also, most of the time when my computer does get to my desktop, the drive is not listed in the disk management program, but it is in the bios. This is not the problem I wanted help with, because I did find a work around, just wanted to add it in case it's relevant.

The problem is, now when the hard drive is plugged in to my new machine, it's disk usage immediately gets maxed out to 100%, with very slow latency and no r/w speed being used, and every few seconds it jumps to a couple thousand kb in read and write speed. Also, it looks like the system is trying to read the drive so that it can display it, because where it says how much is formatted the amount keeps going up. When I plug it in, starting at 0 quickly going to 915 staying there for a long time before going to 931. Which brings me to the last problem, the drive will randomly disconnect itself, and so far, it has always disconnected itself before the format amount gets to 932gb(the drives full capacity). It slows down my whole computer, but more importantly, I can't even open the drive to look inside it. No programs are using the disk, and I can barely run any disk management tools to check on it. It took over an hour to run a "quick" smart test with wd data saver. I looked in the resource monitor and saw that there are like 100 different background windows services trying to write stuff to the hard drive. The largest processes are constantly changing, so there is not just one program or service causing this. Is there a way I can just universally turn off windows services for this hard drive so I can copy all the contents off of it?

I don't plan on using this hard drive after I get the stuff off it. I have try different sata ports, different sata cables, this isn't happening with either my system drive(ssd) or my main drive (hdd). When I try to open the drive with windows explorer it crashes explorer. And most programs that try to read/write that drive will freeze when I try to run processes on it, although usually they do eventually finish, and unfreeze. One process I see using a lot of usage it window/systen32/config/drivers, though it is only reading, which is what leads me to believe the system is trying to read the drive. In fact most of the stuff writing has very low values, and there are very few things reading, so maybe it is just the system reading the drive that is causing the slow down. I plugged in another old hard drive I have with about 300gb of stuff on it(500gb total capac.), and this didn't happen. None of the problems I listed happened on that drive.

oh, also, the results of the smart test seemed fine. I'm not really sure what most of the values mean, but it says it passed in all categories, although from what I could tell, it did seem like there might have been more than a few bad sectors.
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More about hard drive maxed disk usage
  1. Did you do a fresh install of windows if not do that first.
    It's not like you can just pop a LT drive in a new PC and expect everything to work without a fresh install.
  2. Could be a number of different causes, but your symptoms are typical of a failing hard drive. I would guess that it will fail completely and irreversibly at any moment. The lack of SMART errors is not an indication of good drive health, especially in light of your current symptoms. Stop using that drive immediatly until you research your recovery options.
  3. Zerk2012 said:
    Did you do a fresh install of windows if not do that first.
    It's not like you can just pop a LT drive in a new PC and expect everything to work without a fresh install.


    Sorry, if it wasn't obvious, this computer is completely fresh everything. All new parts, I have an ssd for windows, and hdd for everything else. I installed windows 10 on the ssd. The old hard drive with issues is the hard drive out of my last computer so I can get all my stuff off it. The hard drive serves no purpose other than holding the stuff I need. The old computer is no longer functioning
  4. Calculagator said:
    Could be a number of different causes, but your symptoms are typical of a failing hard drive. I would guess that it will fail completely and irreversibly at any moment. The lack of SMART errors is not an indication of good drive health, especially in light of your current symptoms. Stop using that drive immediatly until you research your recovery options.


    I don't really understand. If the high disk usage if being caused by it failing, doesn't that mean that I have no recovery options, as I have no way of getting the data off of it?
  5. The high disk usage and system crashes happen when a drive fails because your computer has to wait for the drive to respond before it can move on to the next process or task. It will show 100% usage while it waits. The drive may fail to read or write and retry many times before it actually sends a response. It will try to remap and bad sectors (which takes a long time) and the data it returns may or may not be corrupt.

    I use a recovery utility that will read through the drive sequentially and try to copy everything off of it. It will basically ignore any unreadable parts of the drive. This can take a long time (days) and it ties up a system until it finishes or fails completely. Once that is complete, I ditch the drive and use other utilities to try to recover files from what I was able to copy. If I'm lucky, the filesystem will still be intact and I'll only have to deal with some corrupt files.

    If the data is important to you, I suggest you send it to a data recovery service, because what I've suggested above could destroy the drive completely.
  6. Calculagator said:
    -snip-

    If the data is important to you, I suggest you send it to a data recovery service, because what I've suggested above could destroy the drive completely.


    Exactly what kind of risks? What are the chances the original drive becomes unusable after copy the data off? Is there any risk to the drive I copy the data onto? Am I likely to get better results that are worth the hundreds of dollars I would have to pay for a professional data recovery? I want to save the data, and preferably as quickly as possible, but I'm not rich, and am wary about putting out $500+ for data recovery. Especially if my smart results indicate no major errors at this time, I question if a $500+ professional recovery is necessary. Also, I'm not sure how a hdd decides where to put stuff on a disk, but everything I care about is pretty much in 2 spots, in one specific steam game folder, and in one folder on my desktop.
  7. Best answer
    The more you use/read from/write to a failing hard drive, the more likely it is to fail altogether. If a drive is failing for mechanical reasons, then every time you spin it up you could be causing further damage. A piece of debris or a misaligned drive head can physically destroy a drive. A recovery service can extract the data without damaging it further. It's expensive because they actually take the drive apart to read it.

    I don't actually know if your drive is failing. I do know that you have symptoms consistent with drive failure. Only you can decide how important the data on your drive is and how much it is worth. Whatever you eventually decide to do, you should stop using that drive completely until you have decided what to do. It may be that you have some other problem and your drive is ok. It may be that your drive is failing, but you can still read everything important from it before it fails. It could be that the next time you spin the drive up it completely fails and all of your data is effectively lost forever.

    Concerning your other questions:
    1. The only danger is to the problem drive itself: the drive you copy to won't be damaged.
    2. Drives tend to store data close together, but what that physically looks like is unpredictable. They can and will store data that may look close together in the file system in totally different parts of a physical disk. Your folders could be spread out over the entire disk surface. They are probably at least somewhat clustered, but an end user cannot easily find out.
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