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ISP router traffic issue : is router switch an option?

I have my wireless router and modem mounted to the wall in the north side of my home.

I purchased a power line adapter to replicate a wired connection to the south side of my home where my Xbox One, Cable Box, and Steam Link are located.

I have 4 ports on my router. One port is designated for my PC. One port is designated for the Powerline adapter which is plugged in the wall directly below my modem and router. The other end of the Powerline adapter is directly behind my Entertainment center with the forementioned multiple devices on the South side of my home (in addition to multiple tablets and laptops).

When I am online gaming in the North side (wired into the router/modem) I get excellent ping and signal with no lag/latency for online gaming.

The South side of the home has issues including the XBox lagging or dropping. If my PC is off on the North side of the home- the cable and Xbox seem to work perfectly.

I purchased a gigabit "router switch" vs a "hub" as a possible solution.

My question is this: Should I connect my switch directly to my router thereby connecting my PC and Powerline adapter to the switch to alleviate possible bandwidth issues or do I connect the switch behind my television to the powerline adapter at the South side of the home ?

Is a switch even necessary? I am under the impression that the switch is obsessed with MAC addresses and the Router is obsessed with other Networks. By adding a switch, I am guessing it would allocate the bandwidth more efficiently?

Am I even remotely correct?
3 answers Last reply Best Answer
More about isp router traffic issue router switch option
  1. Modem <- Switch <- other devices
    Use the router for wifi and the switch for everything that can be hardwired, that will get you the best connection. Your network will only go as fast as the slowest link in it, which I am assuming is your router. Bypassing it altogether will allow the highest speed potential.
  2. Autocrat said:
    Modem <- Switch <- other devices
    Use the router for wifi and the switch for everything that can be hardwired, that will get you the best connection. Your network will only go as fast as the slowest link in it, which I am assuming is your router. Bypassing it altogether will allow the highest speed potential.


    Actually, the modem has coax connections for the Tivo boxes in the home. The modem is connected to the router via coax and ethernet.

    Will Modem <- Switch <- other devices (including router) work?

    Or do you mean Modem <- Router <- Switch <- wired devices (the wireless connectivity within the router will be shared and the wired connections will be equally and proportionally divided).
  3. Best answer
    Um.... am not certain why would u think a switch will help you with the problem.

    Right away, anything that goes through a powerline hookup will have lower performance than straight ethernet. Is the nature of powerline. The quality of the signal is influenced by your house wirings and the AC/appliances interference.

    If no problem by connecting directly on the back of the router, and yes problem if using the same port, BUT GOING THROUGH POWERLINE, then the issue is Powerline.

    All I can suggest to you is, read the powerline adapter manual carefully, it may contain tips to optimize you hookup.
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