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Need some guidance on I5 3570K overclock.

So this is my first ever attempt at overclocking. I've been following this guide http://www.overclock.net/t/1198504/complete-overclocking-guide-sandy-bridge-ivy-bridge-asrock-edition and I pretty much followed everything on here, but I've run into some confusion. Before I start, this is my specs: I5 3570K, motherboard: ASrock Z77 Pro 3, Heatsink: Corsair H60. My first problem is the CPU Load Line Calibration. I watched a video on it and I'm still confused on what it is/does. I only have 3 options: 0%, 50%, and 100%. I set it at 50%. Not really sure where it should be set at. My second question: I don't know where the option to increase VCore is on my BIOS. I checked around online and someone posted in another forum that my motherboard does not have a VCore option, it has to be set on offset mode; again I'm not sure what this means. I've made all the modifications on the guide and increased my clock multiplier from default 34 to 38 and just went from there without increasing anything else. I ran Prime95 Blend for 10 minutes and everything was fine; the CPU temperature hit 70 C max. Honestly I'm not sure if this was even an overclock because my CPU says it has a max turbo frequency of 3.80 GHz on the box. I'm basically trying to get it to 4.2 GHz, maybe 4.3 GHz. Thanks everyone.
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  1. Best answer
    Load Line Calibration basically compensates for Vdroop on your motherboard. What is Vdroop? Basically, if you have a fixed voltage (Vcore) set for your CPU, when your CPU is idling, it will run at that voltage (or near enough). As soon as you start to work the CPU, the voltage can drop down, causing instability if it falls too low. This is why load voltages are sometimes a little lower than idle voltages. LLC attempts to compensate for this by increasing the Vcore when the CPU is under load, in an attempt to keep the same constant voltage. The different options just set how strong a correction the motherboard will attempt to apply.

    Offset mode for Vcore, is just an option that allows you to adapt the stock voltages, rather than assign one fixed voltage to your CPU. Say your stock voltage is 0.95V - 1.20V (it probably isn't, I'm just using these numbers as an example), if you applied a voltage offset of +50mV (or +0.05V), the voltage your CPU would recieve would be 1.00V - 1.25V. Same goes for negative values. The offset is just a voltage that is added to the default settings.

    70C seems high for a AIO liquid cooler, but is not too alarming. I personally wouldn't let it get much hotter than that though. Check it's making a good contact with the CPU though. From what I can tell, you've basically told the CPU you want to run it in turbo mode on all cores all the time.

    If you want to get to 4.2GHz, you can continue to up the multiplier, and if need be, increase the Vcore (via the offset), but keep an eye on the temps. I wouldn't let it get far over 75C max.

    Hope that helped a little
  2. Mightyena said:
    Load Line Calibration basically compensates for Vdroop on your motherboard. What is Vdroop? Basically, if you have a fixed voltage (Vcore) set for your CPU, when your CPU is idling, it will run at that voltage (or near enough). As soon as you start to work the CPU, the voltage can drop down, causing instability if it falls too low. This is why load voltages are sometimes a little lower than idle voltages. LLC attempts to compensate for this by increasing the Vcore when the CPU is under load, in an attempt to keep the same constant voltage. The different options just set how strong a correction the motherboard will attempt to apply.

    Offset mode for Vcore, is just an option that allows you to adapt the stock voltages, rather than assign one fixed voltage to your CPU. Say your stock voltage is 0.95V - 1.20V (it probably isn't, I'm just using these numbers as an example), if you applied a voltage offset of +50mV (or +0.05V), the voltage your CPU would recieve would be 1.00V - 1.25V. Same goes for negative values. The offset is just a voltage that is added to the default settings.

    70C seems high for a AIO liquid cooler, but is not too alarming. I personally wouldn't let it get much hotter than that though. Check it's making a good contact with the CPU though. From what I can tell, you've basically told the CPU you want to run it in turbo mode on all cores all the time.

    If you want to get to 4.2GHz, you can continue to up the multiplier, and if need be, increase the Vcore (via the offset), but keep an eye on the temps. I wouldn't let it get far over 75C max.

    Hope that helped a little

    Yes this helped clear things up a bit. Thanks a lot.
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