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Overcloking help I7 6700K and Gigabyte GA-Z170XP-SLI ATX

i have a I7 6700K and Gigabyte GA-Z170XP-SLI ATX, i am very new to overcloking and i am wodering how to control or set the max cpu voltage. i did try setting it in bios, but my computer keep going way over what i set it to be. also tryed setting it using gigabyte extreme tuning utility, but the voltage keep going over.
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  1. There should be a setting near core voltage that lets you set it to manual/override


    To start overclocking your cpu, set the voltage to manual and set it to 1v
    next, set the multiplier for all cores to 40x
    Boot into windows and stress test for 10 minutes while watching temps with HWMonitor
    If you are able to boot into windows and stress test, set the multiplier to 41x and test again
    Do that until the system crashes or will not boot into windows. Once that happens, bump up the core voltage by 0.025v and test again

    Continue raising the multiplier until unstable then raise voltage until you have your desired/max overclock.
    I would try to not go above 1.39v on that chip for a 24/7 overclock.

    Once you have your desired overclock, run OCCT for 30 minutes to test stability. If the system crashes, raise the voltage some more. If it does not crash, then congrats on your overclock
  2. KeelinTy said:
    There should be a setting near core voltage that lets you set it to manual/override


    To start overclocking your cpu, set the voltage to manual and set it to 1v
    next, set the multiplier for all cores to 40x
    Boot into windows and stress test for 10 minutes while watching temps with HWMonitor
    If you are able to boot into windows and stress test, set the multiplier to 41x and test again
    Do that until the system crashes or will not boot into windows. Once that happens, bump up the core voltage by 0.025v and test again

    Continue raising the multiplier until unstable then raise voltage until you have your desired/max overclock.
    I would try to not go above 1.39v on that chip for a 24/7 overclock.

    Once you have your desired overclock, run OCCT for 30 minutes to test stability. If the system crashes, raise the voltage some more. If it does not crash, then congrats on your overclock



    https://postimg.org/image/o5nznma9f/
    i dont get, what i am suposed to click to manual/override the voltage. above is a picture of what i have to work with, where is the button that allows me to manual/override voltage, is it the static and adaptive button. and if i override the voltage will it still go over for exsample if i set 1.21 v, will it ever go over that.
  3. Ohhhh youre tying to set the stuff from XTU, You always want to set everything with overclocking in the BIOS.
  4. KeelinTy said:
    Ohhhh youre tying to set the stuff from XTU, You always want to set everything with overclocking in the BIOS.


    https://postimg.org/image/vi5ahw47h/
    i am so confused, in XTU why is it saying that the core voltage has gone above the parameters i have set from BIOS(1.2v). and what is VID, i just dont understand am i supposed to ignore VID or is it important.
  5. Best answer
    Ignore VID. You want to pay attention to Core Voltage. If it is just going a small amount past what is set, that is normal. I have mine set at 1.420 but the voltage goes up to 1.432 under load.
    To counteract that, you need to set an offset voltage. So mine has a 12mv difference between what I set. So with offset, i would set it to -0.012v and that will keep the voltage a 1.42 instead of 1.432

    In your picture, you have a 12mv increase. So the offset would be the same as it is for me.
  6. KeelinTy said:
    Ignore VID. You want to pay attention to Core Voltage. If it is just going a small amount past what is set, that is normal. I have mine set at 1.420 but the voltage goes up to 1.432 under load.
    To counteract that, you need to set an offset voltage. So mine has a 12mv difference between what I set. So with offset, i would set it to -0.012v and that will keep the voltage a 1.42 instead of 1.432

    In your picture, you have a 12mv increase. So the offset would be the same as it is for me.


    okay, thank you for the help i just got confused because the XTU displayed wrong voltage and i didn't know whether to care about VID
  7. Glad I could help
  8. KeelinTy said:
    Ignore VID. You want to pay attention to Core Voltage. If it is just going a small amount past what is set, that is normal. I have mine set at 1.420 but the voltage goes up to 1.432 under load.
    To counteract that, you need to set an offset voltage. So mine has a 12mv difference between what I set. So with offset, i would set it to -0.012v and that will keep the voltage a 1.42 instead of 1.432

    In your picture, you have a 12mv increase. So the offset would be the same as it is for me.

    That's really strange as voltage goes down under load - it is a protection mechanism - because the current goes up under load and "current (A) x voltage (V) = power (W)" - so it goes down to keep the resulting power down.
  9. philipew said:
    KeelinTy said:
    Ignore VID. You want to pay attention to Core Voltage. If it is just going a small amount past what is set, that is normal. I have mine set at 1.420 but the voltage goes up to 1.432 under load.
    To counteract that, you need to set an offset voltage. So mine has a 12mv difference between what I set. So with offset, i would set it to -0.012v and that will keep the voltage a 1.42 instead of 1.432

    In your picture, you have a 12mv increase. So the offset would be the same as it is for me.

    That's really strange as voltage goes down under load - it is a protection mechanism - because the current goes up under load and "current (A) x voltage (V) = power (W)" - so it goes down to keep the resulting power down.


    When the voltage drops under load, its called VDroop. The more current that goes through the 12v rail, the lower the voltage goes. I think the lowest it can go is like 11.5v before its out of tolerance. To counter act it, theres usually a setting in the bios called vdroop
  10. KeelinTy said:
    philipew said:
    KeelinTy said:
    Ignore VID. You want to pay attention to Core Voltage. If it is just going a small amount past what is set, that is normal. I have mine set at 1.420 but the voltage goes up to 1.432 under load.
    To counteract that, you need to set an offset voltage. So mine has a 12mv difference between what I set. So with offset, i would set it to -0.012v and that will keep the voltage a 1.42 instead of 1.432

    In your picture, you have a 12mv increase. So the offset would be the same as it is for me.

    That's really strange as voltage goes down under load - it is a protection mechanism - because the current goes up under load and "current (A) x voltage (V) = power (W)" - so it goes down to keep the resulting power down.


    When the voltage drops under load, its called VDroop. The more current that goes through the 12v rail, the lower the voltage goes. I think the lowest it can go is like 11.5v before its out of tolerance. To counter act it, theres usually a setting in the bios called vdroop

    Well, the (12 V supply) current is delivered via the PWM (Pulse-Width Modulation) phase control which should be as constant (high quality) as it can possibly be. Voltage variations should be limited to a few thousandths of one Volt, hence the need for a quality (preferably Gold) PSU, particularly as current and temperature increase.

    My Gigabyte GA-Z170XP-SLI has three integrated drivers for the phase rails, as well as two more for the VCC and another two for the iGPU. A single Hybrid-Digital PWM provides the 4+3 phase output for the VCC (VCore) and VCCGT (iGPU voltage). The voltage set by the phases (accurate to the thousandth of a Volt) is between 1 and 2 Volt (INTEL set a "safe" limit at 1.520 V for 6600K VCore). The VCCSA and VCCIO are derived from a linear regulator considering their low power requirements. They too receive between 1 and 2 Volt (1.250 V on Auto). The current supplied by phases can go up to 20 A.

    While a higher switching rate (the rate at which the current is supplied by the phases to the inductor via capacitors) is better for smooth current (less ripple), it also increases the temperature of the VRM (Voltage Regulator Module), the power delivery system of the CPU which converts the PSU’s extremely stable 12 V to whatever the CPU and GPU need – a high quality constant voltage with an extremely low fluctuation from its nominal value, best for stability overtime.

    Due to VDroop, at 4.6 GHz my CPU VCore voltage, manually set at 1.355 V in the BIOS, varies typically between 1.332 V (under load) to 1.356 V (idle), or two 12 mV steps, which can cause stability problems ---> i.e. it FALLS from its set 1.355 V DOWN TO (not up to) 1.332 V UNDER LOAD and goes UP TO 1.356 AT IDLE (not under load).

    With LLC (Load Line Calibration) I reduce VDroop and VCore drops to 1.344 V (under load) from 1.356 V (idle), or a single 12 mV step, which is very stable (Prime95 29.8 v2) --- i.e. it FALLS from its set 1.355 V DOWN TO (not up to) 1.344 V UNDER LOAD and goes UP TO 1.356 AT IDLE (not under load).

    So, in contrast with what YOU wrote above, which is:
    "I have mine set at 1.420 but the voltage goes up to 1.432 under load."
    ... in MY case:
    "I have mine set at 1.355 but the voltage goes up to 1.356 AT IDLE" -----------> NOT UNDER LOAD.

    Now, let's see... should I return my motherboard and write to the (then ignorant) Gigabyte engineers ;-) ?
  11. KeelinTy said:
    Ignore VID. You want to pay attention to Core Voltage. If it is just going a small amount past what is set, that is normal. I have mine set at 1.420 but the voltage goes up to 1.432 under load.
    To counteract that, you need to set an offset voltage. So mine has a 12mv difference between what I set. So with offset, i would set it to -0.012v and that will keep the voltage a 1.42 instead of 1.432

    In your picture, you have a 12mv increase. So the offset would be the same as it is for me.


    You used offset voltage or adaptive + offset?

    Thank you.
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